Problems with D-Link


T

The Aprentice

I've always had problems with D-Link software so maybe some one here will
speak up on behalf of D-Link and solve my problem. I live in an apartment
and I get my Internet from wireless. The wireless router is a DIR-615 which
is IEEE 802.11N capable, which is good. The problem is that the DIR-615 is
not mine so I cannot manage it and I am left with its default capabilities,
which is bad. I have three computers with wireless adapters. Two of the
adapters only have IEEE 802.11G capability but that presents no problem
because wireless 11G Internet is at cable Internet speeds with a fast D-Link
DIR-615 wireless router. . The 11G wireless adapter drivers permit selection
of connection speed, but 'Auto' works fine. My other computer uses a D-Link
DWA-552 which has IEEE 802.11N capability, which is bad. It always connects
to the DIR-615 in 11N mode at 130 Mbps. There is no speed control. For some
strange reason the DIR-615 always gives me an Internet connection that
benchmarks at maybe 1% of cable Internet speed, unlike the other 11G
wireless adapters. The device driver is standard Microsoft issue. I can boot
either Vista-32, Vista-64 or Win7-64, it makes no difference wireless
Internet is dreadfully slow. If an Belkin 54G is in range the D-Link DWA-552
connects in 11G mode at 54 Mbps and everything is fine.

If anyone has any ideas I would appreciate it. I'm disabled and I'm on
oxygen and I'm not interested in paying for a cable Internet connection when
I can get it for free. I use a network bridge but a better solution is
desired.
 
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P

Paul

The said:
I've always had problems with D-Link software so maybe some one here will
speak up on behalf of D-Link and solve my problem. I live in an apartment
and I get my Internet from wireless. The wireless router is a DIR-615 which
is IEEE 802.11N capable, which is good. The problem is that the DIR-615 is
not mine so I cannot manage it and I am left with its default capabilities,
which is bad. I have three computers with wireless adapters. Two of the
adapters only have IEEE 802.11G capability but that presents no problem
because wireless 11G Internet is at cable Internet speeds with a fast D-Link
DIR-615 wireless router. . The 11G wireless adapter drivers permit selection
of connection speed, but 'Auto' works fine. My other computer uses a D-Link
DWA-552 which has IEEE 802.11N capability, which is bad. It always connects
to the DIR-615 in 11N mode at 130 Mbps. There is no speed control. For some
strange reason the DIR-615 always gives me an Internet connection that
benchmarks at maybe 1% of cable Internet speed, unlike the other 11G
wireless adapters. The device driver is standard Microsoft issue. I can boot
either Vista-32, Vista-64 or Win7-64, it makes no difference wireless
Internet is dreadfully slow. If an Belkin 54G is in range the D-Link DWA-552
connects in 11G mode at 54 Mbps and everything is fine.

If anyone has any ideas I would appreciate it. I'm disabled and I'm on
oxygen and I'm not interested in paying for a cable Internet connection when
I can get it for free. I use a network bridge but a better solution is
desired.

You can get USB wireless devices, which would plug into the computer that
is giving you trouble. If you're having good luck with 802.11G, then
buy one of those. For example, this one is $17. You'd disable the N one
you're using, then use this G instead. Just check the advert, and make sure
it doesn't support N. There are a ton of these things out there.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833704046

*******

Another way to solve the problem, would be to run an Ethernet cable from
one of the computers which is "always on", and use ICS (internet connection
sharing). The "Always On Computer" then provides the routing function.

Always 192.168.1.x 192.168.1.y
Internet ----- Wifi On Ethernet ------- Computer with "bad N"
Computer (use Ethernet connection
(ICS) instead)

The disadvantage of this solution, is the center computer must remain
on, if the right-most computer is to receive the Internet service. Generally,
the only cost involved, is the price of the Ethernet cable. The last
Ethernet cable I bought, cost me $10, so not much of a saving.

*******

The table at the bottom of this article, shows g and n share some common features.
They tried to "tame" the n standard a bit, so it wouldn't do so much
damage to the others, in mixed environments. Maybe some feature there is broken.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11n

Paul
 
P

Paul

Jason said:
why can't the existing adapter be set to just G?

Is that guaranteed to work ?

We don't know the reason the thing is crawling. I assumed rather
than fight with it, just try another.

Paul
 
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T

The Aprentice

"Paul" wrote
Is that guaranteed to work ?

We don't know the reason the thing is crawling. I assumed rather
than fight with it, just try another.

Paul

I think a reasonable assumption is that the default operation is set up to
make 11N devices crawl when they connect to the Internet. I have not studied
the marketplace but I assume that an 11N network is designed for home
entertainment devices. Maybe a distributed 11N home entertainment system
might update program schedules which can be done slowly in the background. A
really good cable Internet ISP might give download bandwidth of 14 Mbps and
1 Mbps upload, (in my experience). An 11N capable router if Gigabit Ethernet
and from my experience 130 Mbps for 11N wireless. I understand that 11N
wireless can go up to 300 Mbps. If all that 11N bandwidth was subtracted
from the Internet Cable ISP bandwidth, then web browsing and email would
crawl.

I think I can post an ad on Craigslist and get a 54 Mbps 11G USB dongle for
$10. Cable Internet starts at $30/month. I know people who are cripples and
spend over $200 per month for a full package. It is criminal to exploit
cripples. The cable Internet ISP guys know they are despised and there has
been much public outcry.
 

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