USB Controller list in Device Manager


B

Big E

Hello all....

I have an older (2003) custom built computer with XP Home SP3 that's been
having problems with the six USB ports and Windows not finding drivers for
plugged in devices.

Under USB controllers in the Device Manager, with nothing plugged into the
ports, there are multiple listings for the USB controllers. Is this normal?
The list is as follows:

SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 0)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 1)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Enhanced Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device
3, function 3)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 6 ports available)

I ask because I have another machine that shows only one PCI to USB
Universal Host Controller and one Root Hub for its two ports.

If this isn't a problem, then I'll have to post all the specifics.

Thanks in advance.
 
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M

Malke

Big said:
Hello all....

I have an older (2003) custom built computer with XP Home SP3 that's been
having problems with the six USB ports and Windows not finding drivers for
plugged in devices.

Under USB controllers in the Device Manager, with nothing plugged into the
ports, there are multiple listings for the USB controllers. Is this
normal? The list is as follows:

SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 0)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 1)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Enhanced Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device
3, function 3)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 6 ports available)

I ask because I have another machine that shows only one PCI to USB
Universal Host Controller and one Root Hub for its two ports.

I don't see that the above is a problem. I suspect that your older machine's
motherboard is failing. While 5 years isn't long to adult humans, it is
elderly in computer years. If you want to keep the machine longer, consider
installing a PCI USB controller as a workaround. They are very inexpensive.

Malke
 
P

Paul

Big said:
Hello all....

I have an older (2003) custom built computer with XP Home SP3 that's been
having problems with the six USB ports and Windows not finding drivers for
plugged in devices.

Under USB controllers in the Device Manager, with nothing plugged into the
ports, there are multiple listings for the USB controllers. Is this normal?
The list is as follows:

SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 0)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 1)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Enhanced Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device
3, function 3)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 6 ports available)

I ask because I have another machine that shows only one PCI to USB
Universal Host Controller and one Root Hub for its two ports.

If this isn't a problem, then I'll have to post all the specifics.

Thanks in advance.

When I run into "wonky" behavior, I boot an alternate
OS, and compare the operation of the hardware. For example,
when my old 440BX motherboard exhibited freezing when I
had more than 512MB of memory installed, I booted Linux
and noticed exactly the same symptoms. That pointed to
a design flaw of some sort in the hardware. The hardware
was extremely stable (ran Prime95 for 16 hours no problem),
once the memory total was at or below 512MB. (So it turned
out to not be a Win98 issue, which was the OS in the box.)
It didn't matter what slots the memory was in, it just
didn't like too much memory. The freezing happened on
accesses to the AGP slot.

I have a Ubuntu and a Knoppix Linux Live CD here, and those
don't need to be installed to a hard drive to work. I prefer the
Knoppix slightly, because of the text messages output to the
screen during the initial boot. You can find Ubuntu at
ubuntu.com and Knoppix at knopper.net . The latest distro
of Knoppix takes a whole DVD, while if you go back a
release or two, there is a release that fits a CD. The
CD versions would be a 700MB download, only viable with
something other than dialup networking. Since I only have
one DVD drive, the DVD version is pretty well useless to me
as a daily test mechanism. (I have a workaround, but
it isn't worth writing about...)

Of course, actually testing the hardware in Linux, means
that a driver has to be available. If the function of
the peripheral is obscure or is complicated, there might
not be a driver for it, and perhaps no way to exercise the
functions and prove it works. So it's far from being
an ideal test environment. But it is free, and adds
to your ability to collect additional symptoms.

Linux tools of interest

dmesg (shows hardware detection saved to a file, at boot)
lspci (lists detected hardware such as PCI or PCI Express cards)
lsusb (lists stuff sitting on USB ports)

As a hardware designer, I have a slightly different perspective
on hardware and why it "wears out". The silicon part of it is
robust, and not usually given to wearout mechanisms. But the
motherboard does have power regulation circuitry, and sometimes
that fails or degrades, causing the hardware to become weak.
Popped MOSFETs, leaking or bulging capacitors, are typical
items seen failing on the board. There aren't too many
chipsets with known failure mechanisms - the ICH5 USB static
discharge problem is one, and the Nvidia's tendency to
lose PCI Express slots is another (again, could be static
related failures). There have been many other chipsets
that were faultless, in terms of outright dead ports
or functions.

There have been chip failures in the past, some due to
chemical contamination. I've read some IBM documents
describing their detective efforts, to figure some
of them out. But if the manufacturing wasn't botched,
there is no inherent reason for silicon to fail. For
example, I've had the same digital watch strapped to
my wrist, for longer than I can remember. It still
works. It's got to be more than 20 years old.

The things shown in Device Manager, are the logic
blocks that control more than one port. A lot of
chipsets have one USB 1.1 logic block per two
physical connectors. There may be one USB 2.0 logic
block to share over all the physical connectors.
So the entries in Device Manager don't correspond
to the physical port. The protocol during setup of
the USB device, results in either the USB 1.1 or
the USB 2.0 block being connected to the port.

A Windows application such as UVCView (older version(s)
had names like USBView), can be used to display
the config info coming from a USB device. That
doesn't guarantee its function, but gives some
evidence that a connection can be made. UVCView
used to be available for download from microsoft.com,
but is no longer hosted there. There are a couple
private web sites, that still offer a copy for
download (at least, a couple I was able to find).
One feature of UVCView, is it isn't as stupid
as USBView was, about handling a large number
of USB ports.

*******
ftp://ftp.efo.ru/pub/ftdichip/Utilities/UVCView.x86.exe
http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/USB_IDs/UVCView.x86.exe

File size is 167,232 bytes.
MD5sum is 93244d84d79314898e62d21cecc4ca5e

This is a picture of what the UVCView info looks like.

http://www.die.de/blog/content/binary/usbview.png

Some information on the parameters seen in UVCView.

http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb5.htm
*******

HTH,
Paul
 
B

Big E

Good suggestions. I hadn't thought of booting to an alternate OS. I am
vaguely familiar with Linux as I occasionally run some programs within
Cygwin. I may give that a shot at least out of curiosity.

New controller card may be the way to go because I'm certainly no USB guru
but I'd like to rule out any software glitches before I spend even a little
dough on this geezer. The motherboard is extremely stable. The regulator caps
for the CPU have been replaced - victim of the rash of bad caps made at the
time. This is probably the most stable machine I have ever seen. I work it
hard and it never crashes so I'd like to hang on to it a little while longer
before I rplace the whole thing.

The main problem is that it is selective about what it will recognize
plugged into the USB ports. This wasn't noticed before as I only ever plugged
in two USB devices and they work OK.

It recognizes:
a) MOTU Micro Lite MIDI interface with software drivers
b) Epson 1650 scanner with Windows default drivers.
Both operate without glitches in any port.

What it doesn't like:
1) Logitech reciever for wireless LX-8 mouse
2) Microsoft receiver for wireless Microsoft Mouse 3000
3) Sony 4GB Microvault USM4GL(B)
4) Sony Walkman NWZ-B105F

These all work in our other XP and Vista machines so it's not the devices.
It doesn't matter into which of six ports any of them are plugged. The
Walkman didn't work with SP2. The Microvault and mice are new purchases since
SP3. Windows can not find the drivers. All show up in Device Manager ONLY
under Other Devices - the mouse receivers as "USB Receiver"; the Microvault
as "Storage Media"; and the Walkman as "WALKMAN" and the drivers are missing.
So Windows knows what they are but not what to do with them assuming the
drivers are part of the firmware.

Here's what I've tried so far as picked up from other threads:
Cleared the SoftwareDistribution folder.
Reinstalled usb.inf
Installed Windows Installer 4.5
Installed Kelly's tweak #400
Made sure .NET was the latest.
Nothing has worked.

The machine has a Foxconn 661M03-G-6L motherboard with the last bios update
available (2007), 3.4GHz Pentium (chip actually runs at 2.8GHz), 1GB RAM, 75
GB HD, 160 GB HD, CD-ROM, DVD/CD burner, floppy (yup, some people still have
a use for 'em), nVidea G-Force FX-5200 graphics card with updated drivers,
Echo Mia audio card with updated drivers (onboard sound is disabled), onboard
ethernet.

I've seen similar problems in a lot of threads both here and at other sites
but not a lot of definitive solutions posted. I'm willing to try most any
suggestions short of a sledge hammer (tempting, though it is and probably
fun, too) and at the same time, come up with a good list of potential fixes
so others can benefit. And... I'll report back.

Thanks again
 
M

M.I.5¾

Big E said:
Hello all....

I have an older (2003) custom built computer with XP Home SP3 that's been
having problems with the six USB ports and Windows not finding drivers for
plugged in devices.

Under USB controllers in the Device Manager, with nothing plugged into the
ports, there are multiple listings for the USB controllers. Is this
normal?
The list is as follows:

SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 0)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device 3,
function 1)
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Enhanced Host Controller (this is on PCI bus 0, device
3, function 3)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 3 ports available)
USB Root Hub (Location 0, 6 ports available)

The above is typical of a PC that has 6 USB2 ports, though slightly unusual
because generally there would be 3 OHCI controllers with 2 ports available
each but don't let that worry you. The ports are always duplicated for the
high speed mode for very good technical reasons.
I ask because I have another machine that shows only one PCI to USB
Universal Host Controller and one Root Hub for its two ports.

That is typical of a machine that has 2 USB1 only ports.
If this isn't a problem, then I'll have to post all the specifics.

Post away.
 
R

rockyhuffsr

Big E said:
Good suggestions. I hadn't thought of booting to an alternate OS. I am
vaguely familiar with Linux as I occasionally run some programs within
Cygwin. I may give that a shot at least out of curiosity.

New controller card may be the way to go because I'm certainly no USB guru
but I'd like to rule out any software glitches before I spend even a little
dough on this geezer. The motherboard is extremely stable. The regulator caps
for the CPU have been replaced - victim of the rash of bad caps made at the
time. This is probably the most stable machine I have ever seen. I work it
hard and it never crashes so I'd like to hang on to it a little while longer
before I rplace the whole thing.

The main problem is that it is selective about what it will recognize
plugged into the USB ports. This wasn't noticed before as I only ever plugged
in two USB devices and they work OK.

It recognizes:
a) MOTU Micro Lite MIDI interface with software drivers
b) Epson 1650 scanner with Windows default drivers.
Both operate without glitches in any port.

What it doesn't like:
1) Logitech reciever for wireless LX-8 mouse
2) Microsoft receiver for wireless Microsoft Mouse 3000
3) Sony 4GB Microvault USM4GL(B)
4) Sony Walkman NWZ-B105F

These all work in our other XP and Vista machines so it's not the devices.
It doesn't matter into which of six ports any of them are plugged. The
Walkman didn't work with SP2. The Microvault and mice are new purchases since
SP3. Windows can not find the drivers. All show up in Device Manager ONLY
under Other Devices - the mouse receivers as "USB Receiver"; the Microvault
as "Storage Media"; and the Walkman as "WALKMAN" and the drivers are missing.
So Windows knows what they are but not what to do with them assuming the
drivers are part of the firmware.

Here's what I've tried so far as picked up from other threads:
Cleared the SoftwareDistribution folder.
Reinstalled usb.inf
Installed Windows Installer 4.5
Installed Kelly's tweak #400
Made sure .NET was the latest.
Nothing has worked.

The machine has a Foxconn 661M03-G-6L motherboard with the last bios update
available (2007), 3.4GHz Pentium (chip actually runs at 2.8GHz), 1GB RAM, 75
GB HD, 160 GB HD, CD-ROM, DVD/CD burner, floppy (yup, some people still have
a use for 'em), nVidea G-Force FX-5200 graphics card with updated drivers,
Echo Mia audio card with updated drivers (onboard sound is disabled), onboard
ethernet.

I've seen similar problems in a lot of threads both here and at other sites
but not a lot of definitive solutions posted. I'm willing to try most any
suggestions short of a sledge hammer (tempting, though it is and probably
fun, too) and at the same time, come up with a good list of potential fixes
so others can benefit. And... I'll report back.

Thanks again
 
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R

rockyhuffsr

I graduated from Texas A&M so I'm not bright enough to keep up with you
gentlemen, but I have an aging Sony Vaio with the same symptoms. I recently
used the recovery disc to restore my c drive only and it will only recognize
my logitech mouse. Anything else it usually identifies and sticks in other
hardware without loading the driver which is out there in most cases.
Windows just won't recognize and load them.
 
B

Big E

I've been fiddling around and I'm still not sure that it's a hardware problem
with the motherboard. On a lark, I did a driver update for the MIDI interface
and now the interface does not work. It shows up under USB controllers as
"MOTU USB MIDI (WDM)". It shows the device is working correctly. However,
there is another entry under Other Devices - Unknown Device. If I remove the
unknown device, nothing changes. I can see the .sys driver files under
Windows\System32\drivers but Windows won't let me pick them to install.

Any thoughts/comments appreciated.

Thanks
 
B

Big E

More info...

I deleted all the host controllers and root hubs and restarted so they would
be reinstalled. Windows found no drivers for them and now all the USB
controllers are listed under Other Devices with that dreaded yellow question
mark. If it makes any difference, the chipset is SiS 661 FX for the North
Bridge and 963/963L for the South Bridge. SiS website lists no USB drivers as
they are provided by the operating system.

This sounds like software to me but I'm thinking of trying a PCI USB card
and seeing what happens.
 
B

Big E

I wonder if the PCI bus is going out or if XP has gotten stupid.
1. The onboard SiS USB has been disabled.
2. Installed PCI USB card (supposedly PnP campatible).
3. XP knew a USB controller was plugged in but would not recognize drivers
on the CD.
4. Downloaded and ran a setup file from the mfgr's website to install
drivers. That helped a little bit.
Device manager now shows (2) PCI Class USB 2.0 Enhanced Host Controllers and
(2) USB 2.0 Root Hub Devices. There is no Open Host Controller or Root Hub.
USB still not functional.
Here's the kicker - Had to move the audio card to a different slot to make
anything happen. Now XP can't "find" the audio card drivers even though I can
see them in the drivers folder and point XP to look in System32 (it won't let
me burrow down farther than that).

Point is I can see all the drivers for both devices but XP can't. Could the
PCI bus be getting wonky?
 
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B

Big E

Thanks Paul. Tried moving the PCI cards all around to different slots to no
avail. The USB card has an NEC chipset and reports the proper IDs that
compare to the .inf files. The OS just won't recognize the drivers or
something in the ID tranlation which takes me back to my previous post...

If the onboard USB is assigned as PCI slot 0 and now neither of my other two
PCI cards are recognized in any slot 1 - 3, could the PCI bus have gone bad?
Seems unlikely but sometimes you never know.

I'll probably have to shell out for one of those new-fangled kick-butt boxes
and relagate this one to lowly file server status. Seems a shame since it's
been a fantastic runner.
 
P

Paul

Big said:
Thanks Paul. Tried moving the PCI cards all around to different slots to no
avail. The USB card has an NEC chipset and reports the proper IDs that
compare to the .inf files. The OS just won't recognize the drivers or
something in the ID tranlation which takes me back to my previous post...

If the onboard USB is assigned as PCI slot 0 and now neither of my other two
PCI cards are recognized in any slot 1 - 3, could the PCI bus have gone bad?
Seems unlikely but sometimes you never know.

I'll probably have to shell out for one of those new-fangled kick-butt boxes
and relagate this one to lowly file server status. Seems a shame since it's
been a fantastic runner.

When you say the cards aren't recognized, have you tried running Everest
and looked in Devices:pCI, to see if something is detected ?

Everest
http://majorgeeks.com/download4181.html

You also mentioned in one of your posts, that a 3.4GHz P4 was running
at 2.8GHz. What is the FSB running at ? Can you check with CPUZ ?
You might also want to check the memory section, and see if the
memory is running at or below its stated limit. Looking back at
the rest of this thread, it occurs to me that something doesn't
smell right there.

http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php

What I'm specifically looking for, is the CPU Input clock setting.
The BIOS "SuperSpeed" option, allows setting the CPU input clock manually.
On older motherboards, the PCI and AGP clocks are derived from the CPU
input clock setting. On newer boards, there is a feature called clock
locking, where, no matter what the CPU input clock, the PCI and AGP
run at sane 33Mhz and 66MHz values respectively. If the motherboard is
an older one, that feature is not present.

If you select, say "165MHz" in the BIOS, the PCI could be 165/4 = 41.25MHz.
That is too high, and will cause some or all PCI devices to fail in
one way or another. For example, if a PCI IDE controller card, derives
a ribbon cable clock from the PCI bus clock, that will overclock the
disk interface, resulting in data corruption. So this is why I'm asking
for details about any manual settings to the clock (SuperSpeed etc).

It is a BIOS designer tradition, to *NOT* warn the user of impending
bad choices for PCI or AGP. The prospective values to be used for those
things, may not even be shown on the screen. We have to guess at
what might happen.

Mobo
http://www.foxconnchannel.com/EN-US/product/Motherboards/detail_overview.aspx?ID=en-gb0000191

Manual
http://www.foxconnchannel.com/EN-US/support/downloads_detail.aspx?ID=en-us0002117

Other than that, I'd be researching the health of my hardware,
with an alternative OS boot disk. See if the hardware is
visible in Ubuntu or Knoppix (700MB download and burn bootable CD),
while running dmesg, lspci, lsusb, from a terminal window.

Also, I like Adrians's suggestion of a web page to try. The only
part of the suggestions there, that make me nervous, are applying
hot fixes. I don't understand Microsoft's idea of version control,
and how all of their software remains "sane" after being tweaked.
This is why, you'll notice in the answers I give, I tend to
shy away from hotfix type solutions, and would prefer if a
fix was delivered in a Service Pack or Windows Update, because
I basically don't trust Microsoft's ability for a hotfix not
to bugger something up.

Paul
 
B

Big E

We’re getting into an area where I don’t know the nuts and bolts, but with
logic and your help, I’m learning. If it has screws, plugs and knobs, I’m all
over it otherwise.

I’m not a big fan of hot fixes either for similar reasons. I looked at the
USBMan website info but I didn’t try anything there yet as none of the PCI
slots seem to be working correctly at this point so the problem seems bigger
than the SiS 7001.

Everest recognizes both the onboard SiS USB and the NEC USB card for what
they are as far as I can tell though I’m far from being an expert. The video
card (Gigabyte GeForce FX 5200) shows up correctly as well. The audio card
(Echo Mia) is another story altogether as Microsoft would have no data for
that one. It shows up as Multimedia Controller [NoDB]. I’ll try a reinstall
on that one later.

As far as the CPU chip goes, I’m guessing that the folks who assembled the
mobo only had 3.4GHz chips on hand. The board is designed to run at 2.8GHz,
800MHz FSB with a Prescott chip, hence the discrepancy. Clock info from CPU-Z
and Everest as follows:

Per CPU-Z
CPU core speed 2806.5 Mhz
Multiplier 14.0
Bus Speed 200.5 MHz
Rated FSB 801.8 MHz

Per Everest:
CPU Clock: floats around 2804.65 to 2808.13 MHz
Multiplier: 14.0
FSB: 200.33 to 200.58 MHz
Memory bus same as FSB

Seems to me not too far off the mark.

The Award BIOS date is 12/28/04 and the version number matches the last one
released by Foxconn though their website says it was released in 2007. Go
figure. I’m reluctant to use a third party update - I’ve seen those royally
hose up a machine.
BIOS SuperSpeed set at 200 MHz (allowable range 200 – 232).
On the Frequency/Voltage Control page, items listed are as follows:
Auto Detect DIMM/PCI Clk: Enabled
Spread Spectrum: Disabled
CPU DRAM Frequency: SPD

I haven’t found anything that specifically states at what speed the PCI bus
is running. AGP must be OK, otherwise I probably wouldn’t be able to see what
I’m typing.

The installed memory is currently now 2GB PC-3200 400 MHz; was 1GB 400 MHz
when I started this thread.

What’s next?

Thanks.
 
P

Paul

Big said:
We’re getting into an area where I don’t know the nuts and bolts, but with
logic and your help, I’m learning. If it has screws, plugs and knobs, I’m all
over it otherwise.

I’m not a big fan of hot fixes either for similar reasons. I looked at the
USBMan website info but I didn’t try anything there yet as none of the PCI
slots seem to be working correctly at this point so the problem seems bigger
than the SiS 7001.

Everest recognizes both the onboard SiS USB and the NEC USB card for what
they are as far as I can tell though I’m far from being an expert. The video
card (Gigabyte GeForce FX 5200) shows up correctly as well. The audio card
(Echo Mia) is another story altogether as Microsoft would have no data for
that one. It shows up as Multimedia Controller [NoDB]. I’ll try a reinstall
on that one later.

As far as the CPU chip goes, I’m guessing that the folks who assembled the
mobo only had 3.4GHz chips on hand. The board is designed to run at 2.8GHz,
800MHz FSB with a Prescott chip, hence the discrepancy. Clock info from CPU-Z
and Everest as follows:

Per CPU-Z
CPU core speed 2806.5 Mhz
Multiplier 14.0
Bus Speed 200.5 MHz
Rated FSB 801.8 MHz

Per Everest:
CPU Clock: floats around 2804.65 to 2808.13 MHz
Multiplier: 14.0
FSB: 200.33 to 200.58 MHz
Memory bus same as FSB

Seems to me not too far off the mark.

The Award BIOS date is 12/28/04 and the version number matches the last one
released by Foxconn though their website says it was released in 2007. Go
figure. I’m reluctant to use a third party update - I’ve seen those royally
hose up a machine.
BIOS SuperSpeed set at 200 MHz (allowable range 200 – 232).
On the Frequency/Voltage Control page, items listed are as follows:
Auto Detect DIMM/PCI Clk: Enabled
Spread Spectrum: Disabled
CPU DRAM Frequency: SPD

I haven’t found anything that specifically states at what speed the PCI bus
is running. AGP must be OK, otherwise I probably wouldn’t be able to see what
I’m typing.

The installed memory is currently now 2GB PC-3200 400 MHz; was 1GB 400 MHz
when I started this thread.

What’s next?

Thanks.

OK. I hadn't considered the possibility of a mismatch between the
Vcore regulator capabilities and the processor's power class. I'm having
trouble remembering the right technical language now, but basically the
BIOS checks the conditions, finds say an 04B processor, realizes the
Vcore is only designed for 04A, and can select the fallback value
for the multiplier. So instead of x17, it is using x14. This is also
why 2.8GHz processors have no fallback option, because they're already
at x14 multiplier.

(Prescott PRB=0 and PRB=1 bit, indicates power requirements)
http://download.intel.com/design/Pentium4/datashts/30056103.pdf

If it was a Prescott, the geometry would be listed as 90nm instead
of 0.13u. When Prescotts came out, they had a pin definition changed
on the bottom of them, which detected whether the motherboard was
"Prescott Ready". The processor itself, would refuse to start, if
the pin was in the wrong state. Thus, for many people, there isn't
any fallback case to consider, because it won't run at all. I don't
know what happens, if you bust off, or insulate the pin as appropriate,
to override the behavior. (The pin on the bottom of the chip, is
a different issue than the PRB enumeration from an internal processor
register.)

In checking the info from Foxconn, it does say the motherboard supports
Prescott. But it doesn't say anything about power class. And looking
at the motherboard picture in the manual, the board has a two phase
regulator ??? So that would explain Foxconn throttling back on the
multiplier. Kinda a pointless design feature - if you support Prescott,
why go for a gutless Vcore ? Prescott was the king of power consumption,
and should have a decent regulator. (This may, in fact, be the first
motherboard I've run into, that made that kind of design decision.
Intel provided for this possibility, but I cannot say I've seen many
motherboards using the feature.)

So that provides a partial explanation of the frequency, and based on
your info that the input clock is 200MHz, there is no reason to
suspect the PCI or AGP clock. I just figured someone had messed
around, to get it to run at 2.8GHz. (200/6 = 33Mhz, 200 is a
canonical frequency, and dividers would be set properly for it.)

The "Multimedia Controller [NoDB]" is coming from Everest and its
own internal database. Which is perfectly normal. I have hardware
here which cannot be identified. What I like Everest for, is giving
the DeviceID, so I can look up the hardware myself. The official PCI
registry is not available to the public, so instead we have to rely
on the publicly maintained list of DeviceIDs. (Either that, or buy
a current copy of Everest from Lavalys :) ) Leftmost column is
VEN, next is DEV, and the third level is SUBSYS.

http://pciids.sourceforge.net/v2.2/pci.ids

You can verify the DeviceID and other numbers, do map to the
product (if it is in that file). And the most important part,
is that the VEN/DEV/SUBSYS appears in the INF file of the
driver installer for the product. There has to be a match,
for it to work. The purpose of looking in Everest, is to
check that the DeviceID type information, agrees with the
INF file of the installer you're using.

I'm guessing at this point, that the hardware is fine, and
something is going on with drivers. There is an example here,
of a place where corruption can occur.

"XP asks for drivers"
http://www.uwe-sieber.de/usbtrouble_e.html

First link involves "driver.cab", the second "the data is invalid"
(a registry settings issue).

http://groups.google.ca/group/microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware/msg/f79c4c044536f6af?dmode=source

I'm not suggesting that you run off and try any of those! Those
are just examples of corruptions that can occur in Windows,
and either screw up the installation of hardware, or result
in requests to install drivers again.

I'm thinking it is a software problem, but I don't recognize
the symptom of finding "extra" unrecognized entries in
Device Manager.

Paul
 
B

Big E

Paul -
Hmmm... After all this jacking around, the onboard SiS Open Host Controllers
show up correctly in under USB Controllers in Device Manager again instead of
Other Devices as was the case there for a while but, alas, the drivers can't
be found by Windows when I enable them.

I'll have to compare the device IDs to what's in the .inf file and then to
the list on Sourceforge. At a quick first glance, the VEN/DEVs are correct. I
didn't look at subsys yet or the compatible ID list in Device Manager.

One question - Is the Matching Device ID shown in Device Manager/Details
from the .inf files? The USB Controllers and audio card that won't install
don't show one. All the other devices do.

I won't be able to dig any further into this for a couple days but I'll post
what I find. If it will help, I can upload screenshots to MediaFire and post
the links. I really appreciate your thoughts on this.

Thanks
 
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P

Paul

Big said:
Paul -
Hmmm... After all this jacking around, the onboard SiS Open Host Controllers
show up correctly in under USB Controllers in Device Manager again instead of
Other Devices as was the case there for a while but, alas, the drivers can't
be found by Windows when I enable them.

I'll have to compare the device IDs to what's in the .inf file and then to
the list on Sourceforge. At a quick first glance, the VEN/DEVs are correct. I
didn't look at subsys yet or the compatible ID list in Device Manager.

One question - Is the Matching Device ID shown in Device Manager/Details
from the .inf files? The USB Controllers and audio card that won't install
don't show one. All the other devices do.

I won't be able to dig any further into this for a couple days but I'll post
what I find. If it will help, I can upload screenshots to MediaFire and post
the links. I really appreciate your thoughts on this.

Thanks

I hadn't really looked at it in that much detail. On trying a few menu entries
from the Details in Device Manager, it looks like the info is derived from
something. I don't typically rely on Device Manager for that anyway, because
Everest makes it easier to quickly review the entries (fewer clicks).

If you look at the Everest info, it almost looks like all devices in the
Devices:pCI are having their config space data shown. So it looks more like
an attempt to read each hardware device directly.

USB 1.1 drivers should have been present in the original WinXP (dunno about
completeness of all brands and instances of USB devices though). SP1 added
USB 2.0 drivers. If the USB drivers won't install, some other software
failing is preventing it. The trick is to figure out what is doing it.
Any error messages, or things you can find in log files, might help.
You'd be surprised how many .log files there are floating around in
there.

For example, if you're having trouble sleeping at night, start reading
the "setupapi.log" file :) Mine is half a megabyte. I see a few USB
entries.

Paul
 
B

Big E

Around in a big circle we go...
I'm thinking about a repair install on XP. Couldn't hurt. At least that
should rule out the OS. It'll just take a gawdawful long time with all the
fixes and service packs and all. Though probably less time than I've spent
already.
 
B

Big E

Well… The following is everything I can dig up on the NEC PCI USB card. The
same occurs for the onboard SiS USB. I’m no code writer so I can’t tell if
everything matches in detail. If anyone sees anything goofy, please let me
know. Meanwhile I’ll do a repair reinstall on XP so I might be “offline†for
a day or two while it collects all the updates.

Per Device Manager:
Device Instance Id:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033&REV_43\3&61AAA01&0&40

Hardware Ids:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033&REV_43
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&CC_0C0310
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&CC_0C03

Compatible device Ids:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_43
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035
PCI\VEN_1033&CC_0C0310
PCI\VEN_1033&CC_0C03
PCI\VEN_1033
PCI\CC_0C0310
PCI\CC_0C03

No listings under Matching Device Ids

Listings under NEC in the usb.inf file
%PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_01.DeviceDesc%=OpenHCD.UnsupportedDev,PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_0
%PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00011179&REV_01.DeviceDesc%=OpenHCD.UnsupportedDev,PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00011179&REV_01
%USB\VID_0409&PID_55AA.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_55AA
%USB\VID_0409&PID_8010.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_8010
%USB\VID_0409&PID_8011.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_8011
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0011.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0011
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0014.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0014
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0203.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0203

From pciids at SourceForge.net
1033 NEC Corporation
0035 USB
1033 0035 Hama USB 2.0 CardBus
103c 1293 USB add-in card
103c 1294 USB 2.0 add-in card
1179 0001 USB
12ee 7000 Root Hub
14c2 0105 PTI-205N USB 2.0 Host Controller
1799 0001 Root Hub
1931 000a GlobeTrotter Fusion Quad Lite (PPP data)
1931 000b GlobeTrotter Fusion Quad Lite (GSM data)
807d 0035 PCI-USB2 (OHCI subsystem)

From setupapi.log when Windows looks for the drivers:
[2008/12/15 23:00:12 4252.283]
#-198 Command line processed: "C:\WINDOWS\system32\mmc.exe"
C:\WINDOWS\system32\devmgmt.msc /s
#I060 Set selected driver.
#-019 Searching for hardware ID(s):
pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&subsys_00351033&rev_43,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&subsys_00351033,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&cc_0c0310,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&cc_0c03
#-018 Searching for compatible ID(s):
pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&rev_43,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035,pci\ven_1033&cc_0c0310,pci\ven_1033&cc_0c03,pci\ven_1033,pci\cc_0c0310,pci\cc_0c03
#-166 Device install function: DIF_SELECTBESTCOMPATDRV.
#W059 Selecting best compatible driver failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are
no compatible drivers for this device.
#W157 Default installer failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are no compatible
drivers for this device.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_SELECTBESTCOMPATDRV.
#W059 Selecting best compatible driver failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are
no compatible drivers for this device.
#W157 Default installer failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are no compatible
drivers for this device.

I apologize if I give anyone a headache even half as big as mine.
 
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P

Paul

Big said:
Well… The following is everything I can dig up on the NEC PCI USB card. The
same occurs for the onboard SiS USB. I’m no code writer so I can’t tell if
everything matches in detail. If anyone sees anything goofy, please let me
know. Meanwhile I’ll do a repair reinstall on XP so I might be “offline†for
a day or two while it collects all the updates.

Per Device Manager:
Device Instance Id:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033&REV_43\3&61AAA01&0&40

Hardware Ids:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033&REV_43
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00351033
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&CC_0C0310
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&CC_0C03

Compatible device Ids:
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_43
PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035
PCI\VEN_1033&CC_0C0310
PCI\VEN_1033&CC_0C03
PCI\VEN_1033
PCI\CC_0C0310
PCI\CC_0C03

No listings under Matching Device Ids

Listings under NEC in the usb.inf file:
%PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_01.DeviceDesc%=OpenHCD.UnsupportedDev,PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&REV_01
%PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00011179&REV_01.DeviceDesc%=OpenHCD.UnsupportedDev,PCI\VEN_1033&DEV_0035&SUBSYS_00011179&REV_01
%USB\VID_0409&PID_55AA.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_55AA
%USB\VID_0409&PID_8010.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_8010
%USB\VID_0409&PID_8011.DeviceDesc%=StandardHub.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_8011
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0011.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0011
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0014.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0014
%USB\VID_0409&PID_0203.DeviceDesc%=Composite.Dev,USB\VID_0409&PID_0203

From pciids at SourceForge.net
1033 NEC Corporation
0035 USB
1033 0035 Hama USB 2.0 CardBus
103c 1293 USB add-in card
103c 1294 USB 2.0 add-in card
1179 0001 USB
12ee 7000 Root Hub
14c2 0105 PTI-205N USB 2.0 Host Controller
1799 0001 Root Hub
1931 000a GlobeTrotter Fusion Quad Lite (PPP data)
1931 000b GlobeTrotter Fusion Quad Lite (GSM data)
807d 0035 PCI-USB2 (OHCI subsystem)

From setupapi.log when Windows looks for the drivers:
[2008/12/15 23:00:12 4252.283]
#-198 Command line processed: "C:\WINDOWS\system32\mmc.exe"
C:\WINDOWS\system32\devmgmt.msc /s
#I060 Set selected driver.
#-019 Searching for hardware ID(s):
pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&subsys_00351033&rev_43,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&subsys_00351033,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&cc_0c0310,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&cc_0c03
#-018 Searching for compatible ID(s):
pci\ven_1033&dev_0035&rev_43,pci\ven_1033&dev_0035,pci\ven_1033&cc_0c0310,pci\ven_1033&cc_0c03,pci\ven_1033,pci\cc_0c0310,pci\cc_0c03
#-166 Device install function: DIF_SELECTBESTCOMPATDRV.
#W059 Selecting best compatible driver failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are
no compatible drivers for this device.
#W157 Default installer failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are no compatible
drivers for this device.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_SELECTBESTCOMPATDRV.
#W059 Selecting best compatible driver failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are
no compatible drivers for this device.
#W157 Default installer failed. Error 0xe0000228: There are no compatible
drivers for this device.

I apologize if I give anyone a headache even half as big as mine.

I have a suitably decrepid USB card from my junk pile, to test
by inserting in my new computer. This is from the tail end of setupapi.log.

[2008/12/16 01:03:33 788.3 Driver Install]
#-019 Searching for hardware ID(s): usb\root_hub&vid1045&pidc861&rev0010,usb\root_hub&vid1045&pidc861,usb\root_hub
#-198 Command line processed: C:\WINDOWS\system32\services.exe
#I022 Found "USB\ROOT_HUB" in C:\WINDOWS\inf\usbport.inf; Device: "USB Root Hub"; Driver: "USB Root Hub"; Provider: "Microsoft"; Mfg: "(Standard USB Host Controller)"; Section name: "ROOTHUB.Dev".
#I023 Actual install section: [ROOTHUB.Dev.NT]. Rank: 0x00000002. Effective driver date: 07/01/2001.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_SELECTBESTCOMPATDRV.
#I063 Selected driver installs from section [ROOTHUB.Dev] in "c:\windows\inf\usbport.inf".
#I320 Class GUID of device remains: {36FC9E60-C465-11CF-8056-444553540000}.
#I060 Set selected driver.
#I058 Selected best compatible driver.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_INSTALLDEVICEFILES.
#I124 Doing copy-only install of "USB\ROOT_HUB\5&59DBDBB&0".
#-166 Device install function: DIF_REGISTER_COINSTALLERS.
#I056 Coinstallers registered.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_INSTALLINTERFACES.
#-011 Installing section [ROOTHUB.Dev.NT.Interfaces] from "c:\windows\inf\usbport.inf".
#I054 Interfaces installed.
#-166 Device install function: DIF_INSTALLDEVICE.
#I123 Doing full install of "USB\ROOT_HUB\5&59DBDBB&0".
#I121 Device install of "USB\ROOT_HUB\5&59DBDBB&0" finished successfully.

Your OS doesn't seem to be searching in the same way, for a match.
On mine, "something" got launched by the services.exe line, but
what exactly, I don't know. All I can say is, as a result of scanning
the INF files in the inf folder, a match was found. I'm going to
try a reboot now, and see what happens during the next boot.
If anything interesting happens, I'll post back.

Paul
 

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