usb freezes laptop?


K

KORISNIK

whatever is plugged in any of the usb ports freezes the system (even
a mobile phone )
It also get frozen during boot if you leave the usb device plugged
only time it does not happen is when you disable ehci controller in
device manager but then you get
'usb device not recognized' when you plug in;hub and controller look
fine in device manager and there is 5 volts on usb connector
does this sound like dead usb part of southbridge motherboard ,chip or
that its pins need to be resoldered?
 
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J

Jamie

KORISNIK said:
whatever is plugged in any of the usb ports freezes the system (even
a mobile phone )
It also get frozen during boot if you leave the usb device plugged
only time it does not happen is when you disable ehci controller in
device manager but then you get
'usb device not recognized' when you plug in;hub and controller look
fine in device manager and there is 5 volts on usb connector
does this sound like dead usb part of southbridge motherboard ,chip or
that its pins need to be resoldered?
SOunds like software issues to me.

Jamie
 
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P

Paul

KORISNIK said:
whatever is plugged in any of the usb ports freezes the system (even
a mobile phone )
It also get frozen during boot if you leave the usb device plugged
only time it does not happen is when you disable ehci controller in
device manager but then you get
'usb device not recognized' when you plug in;hub and controller look
fine in device manager and there is 5 volts on usb connector
does this sound like dead usb part of southbridge motherboard ,chip or
that its pins need to be resoldered?

For a test:

1) Download a Linux LiveCD. A copy of Ubuntu will do, perhaps version 10.10
would be a good choice.
2) Burn the ISO9660 file to a CD, using Imgburn, Nero, K3B, Brasero or other
tool that knows how to convert an ISO9660 file into a boot CD. You don't
just "drop the file onto the disk" - it is not a straight copy operation
with the file. It has to be converted by the burning program.
3) Boot the computer using the finished CD. Do *not* install Linux. Click
the button that says you want to "try" it first. That option, will not
install any software on the computer.
4) Now, you should have a Linux Desktop on the screen.
5) Connect a USB flash stick to the USB port. Did the partition on the
USB flash device mount on the desktop ?
6) Now, try to copy the files on the USB flash stick, to a hard drive
partition. Did that work ? Did the copy freeze up ? If any of the tests
in (5) or (6) freeze, then you know there is some kind of hardware
problem. And chances are, no BIOS setting can fix it. If the test is
failing, you can try executing the "dmesg" command and look for
interesting log messages about the USB port.

Shut down the Linux session, using the shut down menu in the upper right.
By doing a proper shutdown, and not just powering off the computer, it
will prevent corrupting the mounted partitions. Linux should unmount
the test partitions you've been using in the test. Or, if you know
how, you can unmount them yourself, before doing a shutdown.

The purpose of doing this test, is to identify whether the issues
are caused solely by the Windows OS or not.

HTH,
Paul
 

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