The system cannot log you on to this domain because


D

Darryl Moss

Hi,All,

What happened here is that a user called the help desk
(that's me and ONLY me..)complaining that he was receiving
the followimng error message after attempting to log
on: "The system cannot log you on to this domain because
the system's computer account in its primary domain is
missing or the password is incorrect, etc..."

We then checked his login info, all correct, attempted to
login, but received the same error message. We then reset
his password but to no avail..the problem persisted.

I then set up a remote session using pcAnywhere, tried to
login with my user credentials and received exactly the
same results.

I logged on to the local machine as an Admin, removed the
PC from the domain, made it a member of a Workgroup and
restared the system.

After restarting, I logged in as an Admin. locally again,
re-joined the PC to the domain, restarted the system, and
had this user attempt another login. This time it worked.

My question here is that although this seemed to fix the
problem, I'd like to know exactly what happened here.

First, how does a single machine, without any
manipulation, lose its membership to a domain and
secondly, how and why did my procedure work?

Any feedback or insight on this subject would be greatly
appreciated. Thanks!!

Darryl K. Moss
 
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A

aaron

Just a thought but it could be that the computer account passwords somehow
become out of sync. Next time try resestting the computer account and see if
that resolves the issue.

aaron
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2006
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Same problem

I had the same problem this morning for the same time except with 4 different computers all of which were fine yesterday - and no changes to clients or any of the DC's. I used the same method to resolve the issue since resetting the computer account on the PDC didn't work.


aaron said:
Just a thought but it could be that the computer account passwords somehow
become out of sync. Next time try resestting the computer account and see if
that resolves the issue.

aaron
"Darryl Moss" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi,All,
>
> What happened here is that a user called the help desk
> (that's me and ONLY me..)complaining that he was receiving
> the followimng error message after attempting to log
> on: "The system cannot log you on to this domain because
> the system's computer account in its primary domain is
> missing or the password is incorrect, etc..."
>
> We then checked his login info, all correct, attempted to
> login, but received the same error message. We then reset
> his password but to no avail..the problem persisted.
>
> I then set up a remote session using pcAnywhere, tried to
> login with my user credentials and received exactly the
> same results.
>
> I logged on to the local machine as an Admin, removed the
> PC from the domain, made it a member of a Workgroup and
> restared the system.
>
> After restarting, I logged in as an Admin. locally again,
> re-joined the PC to the domain, restarted the system, and
> had this user attempt another login. This time it worked.
>
> My question here is that although this seemed to fix the
> problem, I'd like to know exactly what happened here.
>
> First, how does a single machine, without any
> manipulation, lose its membership to a domain and
> secondly, how and why did my procedure work?
>
> Any feedback or insight on this subject would be greatly
> appreciated. Thanks!!
>
> Darryl K. Moss
>
 
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Joined
Oct 23, 2007
Messages
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For me, this error turned out to be hard coded WINS addresses. Go into your Network Adapter TCPIP properties, advanced, WINS tab and check your settings.



Alternatively, check ipconfig / all from a working pc and compare to the problematic one.
 

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