Sending a fax Windows 7


D

Des

Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.

Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?
 
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P

Paul

Des said:
Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.

Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?

In your description, I see no mention of a "dialup modem".
The fax program is probably expecting to use one of those.

Your ADSL modem doesn't count as one of those :)

There are various "fax bridge" options, where the final hop
is a conversion from an Internet packet, into tones sent
over a phone line. You pay a third party company, for the
ability to perform that bridge. Perhaps you email the fax
content to their server, and the message is then converted
into a fax that flows over phone lines. And for that,
perhaps the Windows Fax and Scan isn't going to know about
such a scheme. You just use an email client, to reach
the third party provider.

When you use your own dialup modem, you avoid the need for
a third party bridge or fax server, and then there are no
monthly charges (except for any charge related to your
telephone usage). So doing it with the dialup modem can
be cheaper, at the risk of tying up the phone line.

If your household has gone "completely digital", then the
conventional phone line(s) are torn out, and the only
thing entering the house, is broadband packets. In that
case, when you want a phone, they give you VOIP or
Voice Over IP. Sometimes, the VOIP box has two phone
connectors, one for the telephone, and one for the
dialup modem or real Fax machine. The only problem
with this, is VOIP doesn't have the same bandwidth
as the phone line did, and Fax users find they have
to set their Windows Fax and Scan, to use a lower
transfer rate. So if the old Fax setup on conventional
phone worked at 14.4K, perhaps over VOIP, you have to
drop the rate lower than that, like all the way down to
9.6K or whatever. So that's the only gotcha about the
completely digital household with no analog phones.
If you connect a 10 year old Fax modem to a VOIP box,
expect to have to crank down the transfer rate by
at least one "notch".

Paul
 
D

Des

In your description, I see no mention of a "dialup modem".
The fax program is probably expecting to use one of those.

Your ADSL modem doesn't count as one of those :)

There are various "fax bridge" options, where the final hop
is a conversion from an Internet packet, into tones sent
over a phone line. You pay a third party company, for the
ability to perform that bridge. Perhaps you email the fax
content to their server, and the message is then converted
into a fax that flows over phone lines. And for that,
perhaps the Windows Fax and Scan isn't going to know about
such a scheme. You just use an email client, to reach
the third party provider.

When you use your own dialup modem, you avoid the need for
a third party bridge or fax server, and then there are no
monthly charges (except for any charge related to your
telephone usage). So doing it with the dialup modem can
be cheaper, at the risk of tying up the phone line.

If your household has gone "completely digital", then the
conventional phone line(s) are torn out, and the only
thing entering the house, is broadband packets. In that
case, when you want a phone, they give you VOIP or
Voice Over IP. Sometimes, the VOIP box has two phone
connectors, one for the telephone, and one for the
dialup modem or real Fax machine. The only problem
with this, is VOIP doesn't have the same bandwidth
as the phone line did, and Fax users find they have
to set their Windows Fax and Scan, to use a lower
transfer rate. So if the old Fax setup on conventional
phone worked at 14.4K, perhaps over VOIP, you have to
drop the rate lower than that, like all the way down to
9.6K or whatever. So that's the only gotcha about the
completely digital household with no analog phones.
If you connect a 10 year old Fax modem to a VOIP box,
expect to have to crank down the transfer rate by
at least one "notch".

   Paul

Ok thanks for that. Questions are
Can I still get the internal modem I used to have. It would have to be
the AGP type and work with windows 7
This would mean a second connection to the phone line (no problem
their) with a filter inbetween? Yes/No

Thanks for your help in this.

I am a private individual sending to another with a standard fax
machine.

Still requres a good preferably free software package.
 
S

Sjouke Burry

Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.

Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?

You need a phone modem.....
 
D

Don Phillipson

Can I still get the internal modem I used to have. It would have to be
the AGP type and work with windows 7

Any 56kbs (telephone) modem will do, providing your
motherboard will accept it and there are Win7 drivers for it.
This would mean a second connection to the phone line (no problem
their) with a filter inbetween? Yes/No

No. A standard phone cable link between the modem and a standard landline
outlet is all you need.
Still requres a good preferably free software package.

The WinXP Pro fax module (optional extra) was a bit clunky but flawless.
You can use any fax software your PC can handle (e.g. old WinFax in
a DOS Virtual Machine.)
 
M

Metspitzer

Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.

Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?

Why not just use email?
 
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P

Paul

Des said:
Ok thanks for that. Questions are
Can I still get the internal modem I used to have. It would have to be
the AGP type and work with windows 7
This would mean a second connection to the phone line (no problem
their) with a filter inbetween? Yes/No

Thanks for your help in this.

I am a private individual sending to another with a standard fax
machine.

Still requres a good preferably free software package.

Dialup modem solutions.

1) USB (key shaped thing) with RJ-11 on one end. That's a complete modem
in a tiny package. Suitable for things like laptops, if the laptop
doesn't have an internal dialup modem.
2) USB to RS232 adapter cable, followed by an old RS232 (serial)
dialup fax modem. That's how mine is connected.
3) Traditional PCI modem card (winmodem or modem with full datapump)
with a couple RJ-11 connectors on the faceplate. The winmodem
relies on software DSP done by your CPU, to convert between "tones" and data.
4) If the PC has an RS232 connector on the back (unlikely on a
modern computer), you can connect an old dialup external modem to
that. My backup computer, with the Asrock motherboard, has its own
RS232 connector on the motherboard plate area.
5) You can get PCI to serial cards, with a DB-9 or DB-25 connector
on the faceplate. Then the old dialup modem connects to the PCI card.
6) Computers no longer have AGP expansion slots inside (that slot held
a video card and that's all it was good for). Modern machines
have PCI slots and PCI Express slots. I don't recollect any PCI Express winmodems,
but I suppose they exist. Externally, USB is a preferred means, on
modern machines, to make low speed connections to peripherals.
(At least, that's why Intel pushed the idea of using USB.)

To make my connection, I have a USB to RS232 cable, followed by
my old US Robotics external dialup modem with full datapump.
Since I paid good money for that boat-anchor, I figured spending
another $30 for an adapter so I could re-use it, would be good value.
The main problem with that idea, is there is no Windows 7
or even WinXP driver for the modem. (There is a driver for the
USB to serial thing.) I ended up applying a "generic" modem
driver of some sort to it, since the modem is not a winmodem and
it accepts the Hayes instruction set (commands like "ATDT"). It
took a fair bit of screwing around, before I managed to make
my connection. Since I didn't renew with the dlalup ISP, I no longer
have a way to test that setup. So the dialup modem just sits there
now, and collects dust. (That dialup modem, used to be my "backup
system" for when the ADSL would fail to work.)

As far as I know, you're on ADSL and not on a cable modem. Here,
we use splitterless installs, where every ordinary phone connection
uses a 4Khz voice band filter, while the ADSL modem connects directly
to the wall. If you had a telephone, dialup fax modem, and ADSL modem,
the setup looks like this. This is similar to my setup, as currently
configured. Some dialup modems have two RJ-11 jacks, for passthru,
and the analog telephone can go on the second RJ-11 jack if you want,
which would save one of the 4KHz filters. In the picture here,
if the FAX modem goes off-hook, the phone should stop working
until the FAX modem hangs up.

RJ11 RJ11 Ethernet
ISP ------- telephone line ----+---------+-------- ADSL ---------- computer
| | |
4KHz 4KHz (serial
filter filter port)
| | |
Analog dialup |
(touchtone) FAX |
telephone modem -------- serial RS232 ---+

The alternative means of connecting the phone, looks like this...

------+------
|
4KHz
filter
|
dialup <--- on this modem, there are two RJ-11 jacks, one labeled "wall"
FAX and the other labeled "phone". Only one of FAX and phone can
modem be used at a time (which is true of the other diagram too).
| Doing it this way, saves one 4KHz filter. I've only got one
analog filter, so this turns out to be a good way to do it. I used to
telephone have four filters, but they were part of the ADSl modem rental
my other ISP provided (mandatory rental, must be returned).

HTH,
Paul
 
J

John Doe

Paul said:
3) Traditional PCI modem card (winmodem or modem with full
datapump) with a couple RJ-11 connectors on the faceplate. The
winmodem relies on software DSP done by your CPU, to convert
between "tones" and data.

FWIW...
We laymen call it a "controller-based" modem
 
R

Rene Lamontagne

"John Doe" wrote in message

Paul said:
3) Traditional PCI modem card (winmodem or modem with full
datapump) with a couple RJ-11 connectors on the faceplate. The
winmodem relies on software DSP done by your CPU, to convert
between "tones" and data.

FWIW...
We laymen call it a "controller-based" modem


Funny, I've Always called them "Winmodems"
..

Regards, Rene
 
J

John Doe

Ant said:
Don Phillipson typed:

Even older dial-up modems like my external serial USR Sportster
33.6k modem would do! Yes, I still have it and works! It is
mainly as a backup when my cable Internet service goes down and
that's very rare.

I have a controller-based USR dial-up modem as a spare. But I have
AT&T DSL and a Clear wireless hotspot. It's an efficient
combination (otherwise I wouldn't be paying for it), and not too
expensive. The wireless hotspot is good for away from home. It is
also good as a 3 Mb per second DSL Internet power booster from
time to time (it might not add much to a fast cable connection).
Windows XP handles both connections (USB connected wireless and
telephone outlet DSL) without a hitch. Either can be disabled in
midstream, and applications effortlessly switch connections.
Unbelievable, considering prior versions of Windows. The wireless
hotspot is also useful for ultraportable computers (smartphones,
like an iPhone) when at home. You could also use a cable/DSL
wireless gateway for that, I guess, but it's pointless with the
hotspot around.
 
J

John Doe

I did a poor job of quoting. I was referring to Paul's mention of
"a modem with full datapump" as what was commonly called a
"controller-based modem".
 
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K

Krypsis

Even older dial-up modems like my external serial USR Sportster 33.6k
modem would do! Yes, I still have it and works! It is mainly as a backup
when my cable Internet service goes down and that's very rare.
I tossed a few out earlier this year. Some were internal PCI an others
were external serial. I have 2 laptops both with internal modems. I
figured these would do if ever I felt the need to fax someone. So far, I
have managed quite well with email.

<snip>
 
M

Man-wai Chang

Any FREE web-based fax service in UK?

Anyway, you need a 56k USB modem to use Fax & Scan Service over PSTN
network.
Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.
Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?


--
@[email protected] You have the right to remain silence.
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and farces be with you!
/( _ )\ (Fedora 15 i686) Linux 3.2.11
^ ^ 22:47:02 up 2:00 0 users load average: 0.00 0.01 0.05
ä¸å€Ÿè²¸! ä¸è©é¨™! ä¸æ´äº¤! ä¸æ‰“交! ä¸æ‰“劫! ä¸è‡ªæ®º! è«‹è€ƒæ…®ç¶œæ´ (CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
 
M

Metspitzer

Hi I live in the UK and woundered if I could send a fax using my PC.
Years ago (about 1990) I had WinFax which allowed me to do this. I
could receive them if my PC was on also. I simply typed up somthing in
MS Word and faxed it.

Now I have Windows 7, an AOL wireless/wired router. I tried
All Programs -> Windows Fax and scanner

But it does not recognise this. I am in the UK so maybe I need UK help
here?

In an effort to save the planet, the phone company could allow your
phone number to automatically detect a fax and re route it to an email
address assigned to your account.

I can't believe we still use Fax machines.
 
P

Paul

Metspitzer said:
In an effort to save the planet, the phone company could allow your
phone number to automatically detect a fax and re route it to an email
address assigned to your account.

I can't believe we still use Fax machines.

When is the last time you ran into the phone
company providing a service for free ?

That's why there are third-party companies for faxing,
if you don't want to run your own fax machine. They can
convert from one format to another, for you. If you
want to receive them as emails, a third-party
company can do that for you.

If a phone company did that, their rates wouldn't be competitive.
And if they can't make money on it, they're not interested.

Paul
 
M

Metspitzer

When is the last time you ran into the phone
company providing a service for free ?

That's why there are third-party companies for faxing,
if you don't want to run your own fax machine. They can
convert from one format to another, for you. If you
want to receive them as emails, a third-party
company can do that for you.

If a phone company did that, their rates wouldn't be competitive.
And if they can't make money on it, they're not interested.

Paul

I have a phone bill that suggests I use paperless billing. I would
love to use paperless billing if it were not for the fact that
costumers are required to register for paperless only billing.

That is so unnecessary. Just send me an email with how much I owe and
debit it from my account. I don't work for the CIA. There is no
reason I need to have to log into a web site each month when I already
have all my bills on auto pay.

Managemyaccount is nothing I care to do. I would, however, agree to
manage my own account if ATT would give me a fax number to use.
Otherwise keep mailing me a bill that I look at and throw in the
trash.

http://www.att.com/gen/general?pid=10839
 
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J

John Doe

I have a phone bill that suggests I use paperless billing. I
would love to use paperless billing if it were not for the fact
that costumers are required to register for paperless only
billing.

That is so unnecessary. Just send me an email with how much I
owe and debit it from my account. I don't work for the CIA.
There is no reason I need to have to log into a web site each
month when I already have all my bills on auto pay.

It might be unnecessary, but it's just a username and password.
Like thousands of other websites.

Are you trying to say that you have a phobia against logging on to
websites?

"Ignore your feelings, Luke..."

--
 
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G

GMAN

Or crap modems. I prefer external serial modems with pretty lights and
audio speaker control! Oh and good old fashion terminal client with
command line: ATZ, ATH0, ATM0, ATDT1234567890, etc. Then, seeing CONNECT
26400, NO CARRIER, BUSY, etc. Yes, I am old. :)


Old, but in good company!!!!!
 

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