Quickie on W7


F

Flasherly

If 1) a DVD is limited to standards of 4G, and not one byte more, and
2) MS W7 surely does come, as distributed, on one, within such
standards expressed as storage, a DVD well might be expected to
comprise, 3) how, perforce, then am I then to account for a standard
installation in excess of 20 gigabytes, indeed -- commonly expressed
and expected to quantify by 30 gigabytes -- without my veritable mind
boggling?
 
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R

Rodney Pont

If 1) a DVD is limited to standards of 4G, and not one byte more, and
2) MS W7 surely does come, as distributed, on one, within such
standards expressed as storage, a DVD well might be expected to
comprise, 3) how, perforce, then am I then to account for a standard
installation in excess of 20 gigabytes, indeed -- commonly expressed
and expected to quantify by 30 gigabytes -- without my veritable mind
boggling?

They have this thing called compression and most of the files are
compresses before installation. The installation expands them into
their desired places.
 
P

Paul

Rodney said:
They have this thing called compression and most of the files are
compresses before installation. The installation expands them into
their desired places.

The initial phase of installation is a bit on the slow
side, due to the time taken to decompress the files.

And even if you stage the Win7 ISO on a USB key
(using the MicrosoftStore tool), it still works
at roughly the same speed. So the decompression
is the rate-limiting step.

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

And even if you stage the Win7 ISO on a USB key
(using the MicrosoftStore tool), it still works
at roughly the same speed. So the decompression
is the rate-limiting step.

Rats. (Will a SSD be faster? :))
 
C

Charlie Hoffpauir

Rats. (Will a SSD be faster? :))

I guess max speed might be obtained by first (somehow) decompressing
all the information from the 4 GB DVD to the 20+ GB SSD, then the
installation could go at the speed at which the SSD could be read....
or the speed at which the device you were installing "to" could be
written.
With SSD prices falling, does this mean we might see Win 9 or 10 being
offered on a SSD rather than a DVD?
 
F

Flasherly

I guess max speed might be obtained by first (somehow) decompressing
all the information from the 4 GB DVD to the 20+ GB SSD, then the
installation could go at the speed at which the SSD could be read....
or the speed at which the device you were installing "to" could be
written.
With SSD prices falling, does this mean we might see Win 9 or 10 being
offered on a SSD rather than a DVD?

Between USB3 and SSDs, things are definitely spiffy.

There're niche SDD's now mounted into the PCI-E card slot. Invariably
on a MB, one if two regular PCI slots, (usually that subset, micro-PCI
slot thingy), yet almost all MBs sold now are graphic-equipped,
chipped Nobody, except gammers, apparently buys a graphic board
anymore.

Coupled with USB3 flashsticks, latest fast MB architecture for a SSD
-- add 4 or 8 cores and and predictive archival/compression
programming to utilize all those cores (the difficult part,
notoriously so) -- people will have to keep a bucket of water handy to
pour over those NAND particles heating up and going cherry from
sustained 130MB/s transfer rates.

(No such luck here - if I run NAND-to-NAND transfers on a same SSD,
it's hardly appreciable. Might as well be copying between platter
HDDs. USB2 in the other regard and no help there, either. Do have
another SSD on the way, though noway I can't see indulging one
computer with two such drives -- both SSD's will go to two computers
for quick-PwrUp/boot, fast program respose purposes.)
 
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L

lew

Between USB3 and SSDs, things are definitely spiffy.

There're niche SDD's now mounted into the PCI-E card slot. Invariably
on a MB, one if two regular PCI slots, (usually that subset, micro-PCI
slot thingy), yet almost all MBs sold now are graphic-equipped,
chipped Nobody, except gammers, apparently buys a graphic board
anymore.

Coupled with USB3 flashsticks, latest fast MB architecture for a SSD
-- add 4 or 8 cores and and predictive archival/compression
programming to utilize all those cores (the difficult part,
notoriously so) -- people will have to keep a bucket of water handy to
pour over those NAND particles heating up and going cherry from
sustained 130MB/s transfer rates.

(No such luck here - if I run NAND-to-NAND transfers on a same SSD,
it's hardly appreciable. Might as well be copying between platter
HDDs. USB2 in the other regard and no help there, either. Do have
another SSD on the way, though noway I can't see indulging one
computer with two such drives -- both SSD's will go to two computers
for quick-PwrUp/boot, fast program respose purposes.)

You need to add the time for at least 140+ win7 updates after the
initial win7 w/sp1 install.........took it longer for the updates than
the initial install on Oct 2013 even if the win7 had the sp1 streamed
in. Believe that there are more "updates" for win7 now......
 
N

Nil

You need to add the time for at least 140+ win7 updates after the
initial win7 w/sp1 install.........took it longer for the updates
than the initial install on Oct 2013 even if the win7 had the sp1
streamed in. Believe that there are more "updates" for win7
now......

Or you could use WSUS Offline Update to gather most or all the updates
in advance, so you don't have to spend time during the install doing
it.

http://www.wsusoffline.net/
 
F

Flasherly

You need to add the time for at least 140+ win7 updates after the
initial win7 w/sp1 install.........took it longer for the updates than
the initial install

ohhhh myyyyy gawddddd

make those updates mandatory and I'm off to *nix, (or sticking mo' w/
an un-updated xp/sp1 if I can't proficiently speak in WINE).
 
L

lew

Or you could use WSUS Offline Update to gather most or all the updates
in advance, so you don't have to spend time during the install doing
it.

http://www.wsusoffline.net/

It was a "clean" install & there was no option to do the updates
offline as the "install" just went to get the updates as part of the
update process.

Offline updates still meant needing to install lots of updates unless
one knew what what each "kb*" is doing which meant spending
more time to lookup the kb* indo.
 
N

Nil

It was a "clean" install & there was no option to do the updates
offline as the "install" just went to get the updates as part of
the update process.

I know you can install Windows while not being connected to the
Internet, and I'm sure I recall being asked whether I wanted to check
for updates even if I was connected. No?
Offline updates still meant needing to install lots of updates
unless one knew what what each "kb*" is doing which meant spending
more time to lookup the kb* indo.

Well, if you want to that diligent about it, you have to look up each
update does, whether you're online or not. I don't bother, I just
install them all. In the unlikely event there was a problem with an
update, you're already at the beginning of the install process.
 
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L

Loren Pechtel

If 1) a DVD is limited to standards of 4G, and not one byte more, and
2) MS W7 surely does come, as distributed, on one, within such
standards expressed as storage, a DVD well might be expected to
comprise, 3) how, perforce, then am I then to account for a standard
installation in excess of 20 gigabytes, indeed -- commonly expressed
and expected to quantify by 30 gigabytes -- without my veritable mind
boggling?

File compression.

Your capacity number might also include the swapfile.
 
M

Michael Black

File compression.
Yes, it's amazing what file compression can do.

Certainly with Linux, you see figures on the compressed space versus how
much space it will take, and it's really quite significant.

Michael
 
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F

Flasherly

File compression.

Your capacity number might also include the swapfile.

Seemed rather large, just not sure I was expecting 4G at 30G over
magnitudes of 13 percent extraction for some standard of deviation by
as much as four times outside averages*. Coupled to the runtime
updates subsequent to connecting home immediately after the W7
install, MS I'll presume honors something of a tradition for a
point-system examination, effecting inasmuch, then, that which
wouldn't lend itself to such efficiency ratios, indeed, for automating
another 20 or 30G further for auxiliary manipulations.

A bulk manipulative often given under general clauses for security
purposes, thankfully, while nonetheless still within non-leased
parameters contingent to continued functionality or use of an OS
outside that clause.

*
http://peazip.sourceforge.net/peazip-compression-benchmark.html#strongest_compression
 

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