PC World, the UK's biggest computing retailer, is to stop sellingLinux netbooks in its stores.


W

Win 7

PC World, the UK's biggest computing retailer, is to stop selling
Linux netbooks in its stores.

Jeremy Fennell, PC World's category director, said in a statement on
Monday that all the netbooks in PC World's stores will feature
Microsoft Windows. He also said the chain will no longer stock
netbooks with screens measuring less than 10 inches.

"Despite initial hype that netbooks would move more users onto the
Linux platform, Microsoft has emerged as the preferred operating
system because Windows makes it easier to share content and provides
customers with a simpler, more familiar computing experience on the
move," Fennell said.

Customers want a "decent, usable" screen size and keyboard and a
software system they are familiar with, Fennell added. "The screen
size is important as customers want to be able to view pages easily,
but the netbook also needs to be small enough to fit in a handbag. The
10-inch models fit the bill perfectly," he said.

PC World is owned by the electronics giant DSG International, which
also owns the Currys electrical chain. A spokesperson for DSG
International told ZDNet UK that Currys stores would also stop
stocking non-Windows netbooks. The online operations of both PC World
and Currys will, however, continue to carry netbooks with Linux as the
operating system and with smaller screens.

The spokesperson refused to give precise figures for DSG
International's Linux netbook sales, but said they accounted for less
than 10 percent of the group's netbook sales.

DSG International's decision to drop Linux netbooks from its stores
drew swift praise from Microsoft. Company blogger Brandon LeBlanc said
the trend of "customers demanding Windows for its ease of use,
compatibility and simplicity" was not unique to the UK, but was
happening in the US as well.

"The latest data from NPD's retail tracking service showed that
Windows now account for a whopping 98 percent of all small notebook
PCs sales at retail in the US," LeBlanc wrote in a blog posted on
Monday. "I think it's important to note that all of this momentum is
happening before Windows 7 is even out! When Windows 7 does arrive
(special report) […] I think the demand for Windows on these devices
will increase even more."

Last year, PC manufacturer MSI said its Linux netbooks had four times
the return rate of its Windows netbooks. Ubuntu sponsor Canonical said
in October that the higher Linux return rates could be attributed to
"teething problems" with running the operating system on netbooks.

On Wednesday, Canonical spokesman Gerry Carr said Microsoft had "the
distribution, connections and relationships in place" to ensure
Windows dominance in retail stores, but suggested that it was a
different story with online sellers.

"There's a big disparity between physical store and online stores,"
Carr said, adding that 30 percent of the netbooks Dell sold online
used Ubuntu Linux rather than Windows.

Carr also pointed out that, while there was a great deal of buzz
around Windows 7, this week's Computex show in Taiwan included many
manufacturers showing off new Linux-based netbooks and smartbooks.

"The IT industry is converging around different non-Microsoft-based
platforms," Carr said. "Any thought that the war is over is a bit like
George Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' statement."

This article was originally posted on ZDNet UK.
 
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B

+Bob+

"The IT industry is converging around different non-Microsoft-based
platforms," Carr said. "Any thought that the war is over is a bit like
George Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' statement."


Fitting, since MS's tactics with manufacturers are kind of like
Cheney's waterboarding.
 
M

milt

Dalo said:
Any facts on either of those statements?

Nope, probably not, but I find most of the ones that go on and on about
Linux in this newsgroup tend to be trolls anyhow. I think they just wish
Linux dominated the desktop so less people would use computers, or go
buy Macs. The general public could not deal with the headaches running a
Linux desktop would bring them. Especially when they are accustomed to
things that "just work". Everytime I've tried a Linux flavor its been
the same thing, it will not work with everything out of the box and to
get it to work either requires installing 10 different packages or
typing a bunch of command line commands or both, and then THAT might not
always work!
 
R

Rich

Fitting, since MS's tactics with manufacturers are kind of like
Cheney's waterboarding.


Lets see if I can translate this
Ok. I picked the wrong gang. I lost my bandanna. I lost.
So ... the other guys are Nazis, Evil, and torture.
I actually know nothing, so I characterize those who I lost to as comic book
villians.
bottom line .. a 12year old who fell off his skateboard and blames his
parents for living in a neighborhood with bad gravity.


Rich
 
R

Rich

I dont know why all the fuss is, linux is going to dominate the desktop
soon....

Microsoft should just accept this because they wont be able to turn the
trend around.

When did you write this?
now that you are awake .. care to revise this?
heh


Rich
 
C

Chuck

All I'll say is this-- one of the more popular "netbooks" sold in the US by
mass market chains
currently under $300, will run XP, Win7, Linux, and, with a change of the
Wi-Fi card, Apples OS as well.
The 10" screen size is not as important as the ability to run at least
1024x768 resolution,which the under $300 cannot do..

TheBiG said:
Win said:
PC World, the UK's biggest computing retailer, is to stop selling
Linux netbooks in its stores.

Jeremy Fennell, PC World's category director, said in a statement on
Monday that all the netbooks in PC World's stores will feature
Microsoft Windows. He also said the chain will no longer stock
netbooks with screens measuring less than 10 inches.

"Despite initial hype that netbooks would move more users onto the
Linux platform, Microsoft has emerged as the preferred operating
system because Windows makes it easier to share content and provides
customers with a simpler, more familiar computing experience on the
move," Fennell said.

Customers want a "decent, usable" screen size and keyboard and a
software system they are familiar with, Fennell added. "The screen
size is important as customers want to be able to view pages easily,
but the netbook also needs to be small enough to fit in a handbag. The
10-inch models fit the bill perfectly," he said.

PC World is owned by the electronics giant DSG International, which
also owns the Currys electrical chain. A spokesperson for DSG
International told ZDNet UK that Currys stores would also stop
stocking non-Windows netbooks. The online operations of both PC World
and Currys will, however, continue to carry netbooks with Linux as the
operating system and with smaller screens.

The spokesperson refused to give precise figures for DSG
International's Linux netbook sales, but said they accounted for less
than 10 percent of the group's netbook sales.

DSG International's decision to drop Linux netbooks from its stores
drew swift praise from Microsoft. Company blogger Brandon LeBlanc said
the trend of "customers demanding Windows for its ease of use,
compatibility and simplicity" was not unique to the UK, but was
happening in the US as well.

"The latest data from NPD's retail tracking service showed that
Windows now account for a whopping 98 percent of all small notebook
PCs sales at retail in the US," LeBlanc wrote in a blog posted on
Monday. "I think it's important to note that all of this momentum is
happening before Windows 7 is even out! When Windows 7 does arrive
(special report) […] I think the demand for Windows on these devices
will increase even more."

Last year, PC manufacturer MSI said its Linux netbooks had four times
the return rate of its Windows netbooks. Ubuntu sponsor Canonical said
in October that the higher Linux return rates could be attributed to
"teething problems" with running the operating system on netbooks.

On Wednesday, Canonical spokesman Gerry Carr said Microsoft had "the
distribution, connections and relationships in place" to ensure
Windows dominance in retail stores, but suggested that it was a
different story with online sellers.

"There's a big disparity between physical store and online stores,"
Carr said, adding that 30 percent of the netbooks Dell sold online
used Ubuntu Linux rather than Windows.

Carr also pointed out that, while there was a great deal of buzz
around Windows 7, this week's Computex show in Taiwan included many
manufacturers showing off new Linux-based netbooks and smartbooks.

"The IT industry is converging around different non-Microsoft-based
platforms," Carr said. "Any thought that the war is over is a bit like
George Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' statement."

This article was originally posted on ZDNet UK.


I dont know why all the fuss is, linux is going to dominate the desktop
soon....

Microsoft should just accept this because they wont be able to turn the
trend around.
 
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C

Charlie Tame

If I wanted to buy a computer the LAST place I'd go is Curry's.

The machines sold there will be sold TO the uneducated BY the
uneducated, ie Grandma buying gift for student to take to college.

This is not an indication of the relative merits of the two systems at
all, it is an indication that the retailer acknowledges the lack of
knowledge of their own staff. :)

What's new?

All I'll say is this-- one of the more popular "netbooks" sold in the US by
mass market chains
currently under $300, will run XP, Win7, Linux, and, with a change of the
Wi-Fi card, Apples OS as well.
The 10" screen size is not as important as the ability to run at least
1024x768 resolution,which the under $300 cannot do..

TheBiG said:
Win said:
PC World, the UK's biggest computing retailer, is to stop selling
Linux netbooks in its stores.

Jeremy Fennell, PC World's category director, said in a statement on
Monday that all the netbooks in PC World's stores will feature
Microsoft Windows. He also said the chain will no longer stock
netbooks with screens measuring less than 10 inches.

"Despite initial hype that netbooks would move more users onto the
Linux platform, Microsoft has emerged as the preferred operating
system because Windows makes it easier to share content and provides
customers with a simpler, more familiar computing experience on the
move," Fennell said.

Customers want a "decent, usable" screen size and keyboard and a
software system they are familiar with, Fennell added. "The screen
size is important as customers want to be able to view pages easily,
but the netbook also needs to be small enough to fit in a handbag. The
10-inch models fit the bill perfectly," he said.

PC World is owned by the electronics giant DSG International, which
also owns the Currys electrical chain. A spokesperson for DSG
International told ZDNet UK that Currys stores would also stop
stocking non-Windows netbooks. The online operations of both PC World
and Currys will, however, continue to carry netbooks with Linux as the
operating system and with smaller screens.

The spokesperson refused to give precise figures for DSG
International's Linux netbook sales, but said they accounted for less
than 10 percent of the group's netbook sales.

DSG International's decision to drop Linux netbooks from its stores
drew swift praise from Microsoft. Company blogger Brandon LeBlanc said
the trend of "customers demanding Windows for its ease of use,
compatibility and simplicity" was not unique to the UK, but was
happening in the US as well.

"The latest data from NPD's retail tracking service showed that
Windows now account for a whopping 98 percent of all small notebook
PCs sales at retail in the US," LeBlanc wrote in a blog posted on
Monday. "I think it's important to note that all of this momentum is
happening before Windows 7 is even out! When Windows 7 does arrive
(special report) […] I think the demand for Windows on these devices
will increase even more."

Last year, PC manufacturer MSI said its Linux netbooks had four times
the return rate of its Windows netbooks. Ubuntu sponsor Canonical said
in October that the higher Linux return rates could be attributed to
"teething problems" with running the operating system on netbooks.

On Wednesday, Canonical spokesman Gerry Carr said Microsoft had "the
distribution, connections and relationships in place" to ensure
Windows dominance in retail stores, but suggested that it was a
different story with online sellers.

"There's a big disparity between physical store and online stores,"
Carr said, adding that 30 percent of the netbooks Dell sold online
used Ubuntu Linux rather than Windows.

Carr also pointed out that, while there was a great deal of buzz
around Windows 7, this week's Computex show in Taiwan included many
manufacturers showing off new Linux-based netbooks and smartbooks.

"The IT industry is converging around different non-Microsoft-based
platforms," Carr said. "Any thought that the war is over is a bit like
George Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' statement."

This article was originally posted on ZDNet UK.

I dont know why all the fuss is, linux is going to dominate the desktop
soon....

Microsoft should just accept this because they wont be able to turn the
trend around.
 

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