^p means carriage return


J

Jane

I am using Word 2003.
I have a macro that replaces ^p^p^p with ^p^p in a work document.
I have worked out that ^p is a carriage return. Is there a list of what ^p
means and others?

I have a list of bullet points and when the macro does the replace above it
removes the last carriage return so I get a bullet point on the next line
with nothing next to it. I want to find out how to search for the bullet
point with nothing next to it and replace with a blank.
 
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D

DeanH

In addition to what Graham has posted, I would also change the macro fo
change ^p^p to ^p, that way you wont get the superfluos paragraph marks.
Then sort out the styles to include Space After in the Paragraph attributes
to give you the effect of the layout you got with the superfluous paragraph
mark.
Using Paragraph Marks (Returns) purely for spacing is not the best way to
use Word and it will cause problems, as you have already described.
Hope this helps
DeanH
 
M

macropod

Hi DeanH,

An even better Find/Replace expression would be:
Find = (^13)[^13]{1,}
Replace = \1
with:
..MatchWildcards = True
That way, only one Find/Replace action is needed.
 
D

DeanH

Macropod,
Very true and a nice neat way of doing the job.
The article Graham attached does show that this is possible.
My hope was that Jane would understand that superfluous paragraph marks
should not be used for spacing purposes.

They are the bain of my life from certain contributors I have and they just
wont learn :-(

....maybe one day... ;-)

DeanH


macropod said:
Hi DeanH,

An even better Find/Replace expression would be:
Find = (^13)[^13]{1,}
Replace = \1
with:
..MatchWildcards = True
That way, only one Find/Replace action is needed.

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


DeanH said:
In addition to what Graham has posted, I would also change the macro fo
change ^p^p to ^p, that way you wont get the superfluos paragraph marks.
Then sort out the styles to include Space After in the Paragraph attributes
to give you the effect of the layout you got with the superfluous paragraph
mark.
Using Paragraph Marks (Returns) purely for spacing is not the best way to
use Word and it will cause problems, as you have already described.
Hope this helps
DeanH
.
 
M

macropod

Hi DeanH,

I know what you mean - they're probably part of the same group that hard-formats everything in sight, totally oblivious to the
underlying Styles (but mostly they just use 'Normal') and don't even do that in a consistent manner ...

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


DeanH said:
Macropod,
Very true and a nice neat way of doing the job.
The article Graham attached does show that this is possible.
My hope was that Jane would understand that superfluous paragraph marks
should not be used for spacing purposes.

They are the bain of my life from certain contributors I have and they just
wont learn :-(

...maybe one day... ;-)

DeanH


macropod said:
Hi DeanH,

An even better Find/Replace expression would be:
Find = (^13)[^13]{1,}
Replace = \1
with:
..MatchWildcards = True
That way, only one Find/Replace action is needed.

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


DeanH said:
In addition to what Graham has posted, I would also change the macro fo
change ^p^p to ^p, that way you wont get the superfluos paragraph marks.
Then sort out the styles to include Space After in the Paragraph attributes
to give you the effect of the layout you got with the superfluous paragraph
mark.
Using Paragraph Marks (Returns) purely for spacing is not the best way to
use Word and it will cause problems, as you have already described.
Hope this helps
DeanH


:

I am using Word 2003.
I have a macro that replaces ^p^p^p with ^p^p in a work document.
I have worked out that ^p is a carriage return. Is there a list of what ^p
means and others?

I have a list of bullet points and when the macro does the replace above it
removes the last carriage return so I get a bullet point on the next line
with nothing next to it. I want to find out how to search for the bullet
point with nothing next to it and replace with a blank.
.
 
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D

DeanH

Macropod, yep, that's them, the "normal-for-everything" brigade :)

DeanH


macropod said:
Hi DeanH,

I know what you mean - they're probably part of the same group that hard-formats everything in sight, totally oblivious to the
underlying Styles (but mostly they just use 'Normal') and don't even do that in a consistent manner ...

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


DeanH said:
Macropod,
Very true and a nice neat way of doing the job.
The article Graham attached does show that this is possible.
My hope was that Jane would understand that superfluous paragraph marks
should not be used for spacing purposes.

They are the bain of my life from certain contributors I have and they just
wont learn :-(

...maybe one day... ;-)

DeanH


macropod said:
Hi DeanH,

An even better Find/Replace expression would be:
Find = (^13)[^13]{1,}
Replace = \1
with:
..MatchWildcards = True
That way, only one Find/Replace action is needed.

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


In addition to what Graham has posted, I would also change the macro fo
change ^p^p to ^p, that way you wont get the superfluos paragraph marks.
Then sort out the styles to include Space After in the Paragraph attributes
to give you the effect of the layout you got with the superfluous paragraph
mark.
Using Paragraph Marks (Returns) purely for spacing is not the best way to
use Word and it will cause problems, as you have already described.
Hope this helps
DeanH


:

I am using Word 2003.
I have a macro that replaces ^p^p^p with ^p^p in a work document.
I have worked out that ^p is a carriage return. Is there a list of what ^p
means and others?

I have a list of bullet points and when the macro does the replace above it
removes the last carriage return so I get a bullet point on the next line
with nothing next to it. I want to find out how to search for the bullet
point with nothing next to it and replace with a blank.

.
 

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