Outlook 2007 is asking for a password for a PST file unecessarily


W

weewillie

Using outlook 2007 sp2 on vista business sp1

I seemed to have one too many pst files, so the other day I renamed
one xxx.old
is it a coincidence, but I'm now being asked for a password for a
minor pst file (ie not my main one) which has never had a password

what should I do

tia

David
 
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R

Roady [MVP]

Renaming a pst-file to .old could corrupt your mail profile when you do not
disconnect it from Outlook first.
You could try to rename it back and see if Outlook recovers. Then disconnect
the pst-file properly via
File-> Data File Management...
After that you can do with the file whatever you want.

Outlook will not make up passwords of its own but you could try the ones
that you have used on any of the others.
If that doesn't work see;
http://www.howto-outlook.com/faq/passwordnotremembered.htm
 
W

weewillie

Robert, thanks for your help

The only way I could use the minor pst file was to download 'Nucleus
Kernel PST Recovery at a cost of £17, some of them were $130 !
There were just 3 weird characters in the password box
I've now reset it to a blank pw

However, all is not well
My main pst file is outlook.pst and about 1.8gb in size, and is stored
in the default location
I've now added back the minor pst file
and have run scanpst on both files,
However all my inbox folders have disappeared, and I've got loads of
them
How do I get them back?

David
 
R

Roady [MVP]

Scanpst.exe offers you to create a backup before doing a repair. The backup
is placed in the same directory as the original pst-file you scanned. Simply
rename your current (scanned) pst-file to .old and the original back to .pst

My guess is that the 1.8GB pst-file is still in the ANSI format and thus it
has reached its maximum size. In that case see;
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/296088
 
W

weewillie

Thanks Robert

I noticed 18 months ago when I upgraded with a new laptop from 2003 to
office 2007, that instantly my pst file doubled in size

No idea whether it is or isnt ansi, but presume 2007 either is or it
isnt

outlook did make up passwords on it's own, for the sake of
correctness, the pw it created was " *i~{ "
which I discovered with the utility I mentioned

an ever stranger thing happened, whilst on the phone to an it support
company I was asked to reboot
B4 the reboot my pst file was 1.5gb, after the reboot it was 2mb
go figure

I thought the 2gb pst limit was on pre 2007 office versions
 
B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

outlook did make up passwords on it's own, for the sake of
correctness, the pw it created was " *i~{ "
which I discovered with the utility I mentioned
Never heard of this.
an ever stranger thing happened, whilst on the phone to an it support
company I was asked to reboot
B4 the reboot my pst file was 1.5gb, after the reboot it was 2mb
go figure
Did you close Outlook before rebooting?
I thought the 2gb pst limit was on pre 2007 office versions
The size limit is an attribute of the PST itself. If you use a PST created
with Outlook 2002 or earlier, it will be limited to 2GB no matter what version
of Outlook uses it.
 
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W

weewillie

(e-mail address removed)> wrote in message


Never heard of this.


Did you close Outlook before rebooting?


The size limit is an attribute of the PST itself. If you use a PST created
with Outlook 2002 or earlier, it will be limited to 2GB no matter what version
of Outlook uses it.
Brian
Yes, I would always close all open files before rebooting

David
 
B

Brian Tillman [MVP - Outlook]

Yes, I would always close all open files before rebooting
If a previously unpassworded PST starts to prompt for a password, it's a sign
that the PST has been damaged, perhaps by having been removed abruptly from
the mail profile while a write was in progress. There's no good way to tell.

This and your other symptoms indicate to me you may have some third-party tool
accessing your PSTs in unexpected ways (AV scanner, for example, or some
Outlook add-in) and corrupting the files. PSTs shouldn't unexpectedly acquire
passwords or change sizes dramatically. Those symptoms indicate metadata
corruption in the file.
 
W

weewillie

If a previously unpassworded PST starts to prompt for a password, it's a sign
that the PST has been damaged, perhaps by having been removed abruptly from
the mail profile while a write was in progress. There's no good way to tell.

This and your other symptoms indicate to me you may have some third-party tool
accessing your PSTs in unexpected ways (AV scanner, for example, or some
Outlook add-in) and corrupting the files. PSTs shouldn't unexpectedly acquire
passwords or change sizes dramatically. Those symptoms indicate metadata
corruption in the file.
Brian,

Thanks for that
I have removed the itunes addin as that was supposed to be troublesome
I now know
But often my outlook goes into 'not responding' which is probably how
pst corruption can take place
I've run scanpst and office detect and repair, largely without
anything needed to be done

David
 
J

Jimmy Read

Many a times when we try to get access to the data in the PST Files, it asks for a password. It happens so because we have given a password to prevent unauthorized viewing. Sometimes we forget the password for the PST Files. If you also encounter the same problem, then there is no need to worry. The solution to your problem is <a href="http://www.pstpasswordrecovery.com/pst-forgotten-password-recovery.php">PST Forgotten Password Recovery</a> software. This software all the forgotten passwords for your PST Files. This software recovers these passwords using sophisticated algorithm. It does not corrupt your PST Files and does the password recovery very quickly. It also repairs your damaged PST Files as well.
 
W

wangdong

Usingoutlook2007 sp2 on vista business sp1

I seemed to have one too many pst files, so the other day I renamed
one xxx.old
is it a coincidence, but I'm now being asked for a password for a
minor pst file (ie not my main one) which has never had a password

what should I do

tia

David
Even if you forget the password for the encrypted PST file, you can
still decrypt it by using Advanced Outlook Repair. Advanced Outlook
Repair can decrypt all the encrypted data and convert it into a new
PST file that doesn't require a password. You can visit
http://www.datanumen.com/aor/problems/outlook-password.htm to get more
detailed information.

http://www.datanumen.com/aor/ contains detailed information about
Advanced Outlook Repair.

And you can also download a free demo version at http://www.datanumen.com/aor/aor.exe

Alan
 
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W

weewillie

Even if you forget the password for the encrypted PST file, you can
still decrypt it by using Advanced Outlook Repair. Advanced Outlook
Repair can decrypt all the encrypted data and convert it into a new
PST file that doesn't require a password. You can visit
http://www.datanumen.com/aor/problems/outlook-password.htm to get more
detailed information.

http://www.datanumen.com/aor/ contains detailed information about
Advanced Outlook Repair.

And you can also download a free demo version at http://www.datanumen.com/aor/aor.exe

Alan
Thanks Alan,

Thats what I did and it fixed it
 
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