OST vs PST


R

Robert Kufrin

I am using Windows XP on two desktops and a laptop. I use Outlook 2003
for all my contacts and email. I have been copying and transporting my
pst file between home and office in order to always have the current
email and schedule information. We recently installed an Exchange 2003
server at the office and will be switching it on later this week.

I am trying to understand the differences between an ost file and a pst
file and how I could best move information back and forth. I would like
to use my office desktop as the primary computer which would be
connected to the exchange server. I have an office laptop that I move to
different locations off the network. Most frequently I copy my pst file
to my cruzer drive and move it to my home computer. After I am done with
emails I copy it back on the cruzer and take it back to the office.

I have satellite internet at home which is not very fast. Basically it
is just a little better than dialup (600k down and 100k up.)

I have been lookng at site information on setting up an ost file, but if
I do, then do I drop the pst file movement. Where is the best location
for me to figure it all out? My current pst file is around 60 megs and
will grow to about 150 megs by the end of the year.

Any advice or suggestions would be appreciate.

Bob Kufrin
(e-mail address removed)
 
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S

Sue Mosher [MVP-Outlook]

An OST file is tied to a particular Exchange mailbox and Outlook mail profile. It is a local cache of the data on the server. You cannot use it to transport items between machines.

If, however, all three of your machines are set up to use Outlook 2003 in Cached Exchange mode, they will all contain the same data from the server in their OST files, and you will not need to move any data between machines.

--
Sue Mosher, Outlook MVP
Author of Configuring Microsoft Outlook 2003

and Microsoft Outlook Programming - Jumpstart for
Administrators, Power Users, and Developers
 
B

Brian Tillman

Robert Kufrin said:
I am using Windows XP on two desktops and a laptop. I use Outlook 2003
for all my contacts and email. I have been copying and transporting my
pst file between home and office in order to always have the current
email and schedule information. We recently installed an Exchange 2003
server at the office and will be switching it on later this week.
One you get the mailboxes defined in Exchange, you should no longer be using
PSTs for mail delivery.
I am trying to understand the differences between an ost file and a
pst file and how I could best move information back and forth.
With an Exchange server and proper network configuration, there should be no
reason to "move information back and forth." You connect to your Exchange
server both at the office and away from it, the latter either with a VPN,
RPC over HTTP, or Outlook Web Access.
I would like to use my office desktop as the primary computer which
would be connected to the exchange server. I have an office laptop
that I move to different locations off the network. Most frequently I
copy my pst file to my cruzer drive and move it to my home computer.
After I am done with emails I copy it back on the cruzer and take it
back to the office.
Fairly typical.
I have been lookng at site information on setting up an ost file, but
if I do, then do I drop the pst file movement.
An OST comes with the Exchange territory if you use either Offline Folders
or Cached Exchange mode. You don't have to create it, Outlook will. It
reflects the contents of the Exchange mailbox at the time of
synchronization. It's not for transfer of data between machines.
Where is the best
location for me to figure it all out? My current pst file is around
60 megs and will grow to about 150 megs by the end of the year.
You shouldn't need a PST once you're on Exchange unless the mail policies
your management establishes don't allow sufficient mailbox space.
 
R

Robert Kufrin

An OST file is tied to a particular Exchange mailbox and Outlook mail profile. It is a local cache of the data on the server. You cannot use it to transport items between machines.

If, however, all three of your machines are set up to use Outlook 2003 in Cached Exchange mode, they will all contain the same data from the server in their OST files, and you will not need to move any data between machines.
Sue: I use all three of my computers interchangably. I
receive work based email which will be based on the
exchange server with personal mail which includes gmail and
hughes.net email. Will the exchange ost file receive and
allow access for all three types of email?
 
S

Sue Mosher [MVP-Outlook]

Remember that the OST file is a cache of what's on the Exchange server mailbox. If the Exchange mailbox is set as the default delivery store and there are no rules to move items to .pst files, then all the mail from all POP3 accounts will be in the Exchange Inbox and thus in the OST file.

--
Sue Mosher, Outlook MVP
Author of Configuring Microsoft Outlook 2003

and Microsoft Outlook Programming - Jumpstart for
Administrators, Power Users, and Developers
 
R

Robert Kufrin

Remember that the OST file is a cache of what's on the Exchange server mailbox. If the Exchange mailbox is set as the default delivery store and there are no rules to move items to .pst files, then all the mail from all POP3 accounts will be in the Exchange Inbox and thus in the OST file.
Is this covered in more detail in your book?
 
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S

Sue Mosher [MVP-Outlook]

No, because it's not a configuration issue so much as the way Outlook operates (and has always operated).

What other detail are you hoping to find?

--
Sue Mosher, Outlook MVP
Author of Configuring Microsoft Outlook 2003

and Microsoft Outlook Programming - Jumpstart for
Administrators, Power Users, and Developers
 
R

Robert Kufrin

One you get the mailboxes defined in Exchange, you should no longer be using
PSTs for mail delivery.


With an Exchange server and proper network configuration, there should be no
reason to "move information back and forth." You connect to your Exchange
server both at the office and away from it, the latter either with a VPN,
RPC over HTTP, or Outlook Web Access.


Fairly typical.


An OST comes with the Exchange territory if you use either Offline Folders
or Cached Exchange mode. You don't have to create it, Outlook will. It
reflects the contents of the Exchange mailbox at the time of
synchronization. It's not for transfer of data between machines.


You shouldn't need a PST once you're on Exchange unless the mail policies
your management establishes don't allow sufficient mailbox space.
Brian: I am the management so I should be able to allow it
to happen. Your comments have been very helpful. We are
schdedule to activate our exchange server this Thursday
afternoon.
Bob
 
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D

Diane Poremsky [MVP]

receive work based email which will be based on the
exchange server with personal mail which includes gmail and
hughes.net email. Will the exchange ost file receive and
allow access for all three types of email?
Yes.. but only if you have the personal mail delivered in the Exchange
mailbox. I have several accounts in my profile - pop3 and exchange.
Everything goes into the exchange mailbox for storage but replies properly
go out on the correct account. I'm the boss and I make and enforce the
policy, so mixing personal and business isn't an issue. :)

Have you tried the Cruzer sync software?
 

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