NVIDIA: "We Underestimated Necessary Resources for Vista Driver Development"


A

AirRaid

Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html
 
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F

Frank

AirRaid said:
Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html

Glad to hear this is not a Vista problem as some here said it was and
hoped it was. It's also amazing nvidia couldn't get a proper driver
since beta's of Vista have been available for over a year!
Thankfully I use only ATI and Matrox cards.
Frank
 
S

Stephan Rose

Frank said:
AirRaid said:
Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html

Glad to hear this is not a Vista problem as some here said it was and
hoped it was. It's also amazing nvidia couldn't get a proper driver
since beta's of Vista have been available for over a year!
Thankfully I use only ATI and Matrox cards.

Actually it's not very amazing Frank. Developers generally don't devote
resources to beta-applications. Especially not when it's called windows and
released by Microsoft considering their history of constantly delaying
final release.

The nature of beta-software is that *anything* can change *anywhere* at
*anytime*. The result of this is, and this is not MS specific, is that if
the company who owns the beta product decides to make a change somewhere
because it needs to for their own reasons, that all of a sudden days,
weeks, or more worth of work can be lost by work from other companies
dependant on what was changed.

On top of that, in this particular scenario...you have to add in that the
drivers work completely different and a completely new and differently
working API was in the mix as well. Any of it subject to change at any
moment during the beta phase.

So basically the bottom line is this. Until a product gets out of beta and
is released, developers cannot with confidence base their work on the beta
product.

And in case of MS, I've even seen them drop beta's entirely in the middle of
it! Managed DirectX 2.0 comes to mind which was dropped out of the clear
blue sky for the XNA Framework. Now imagine what something like that would
do to a developer creating work based on MDX2.0. It would be disastrous and
that's why developers don't do it.

Being a software developer for a living myself I can't say I can blame them.

--
Stephan
2003 Yamaha R6

å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
 
W

Walter Mitty

Stephan Rose said:
Frank said:
AirRaid said:
Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html

Glad to hear this is not a Vista problem as some here said it was and
hoped it was. It's also amazing nvidia couldn't get a proper driver
since beta's of Vista have been available for over a year!
Thankfully I use only ATI and Matrox cards.

Actually it's not very amazing Frank. Developers generally don't devote
resources to beta-applications. Especially not when it's called windows and
released by Microsoft considering their history of constantly delaying
final release.

The nature of beta-software is that *anything* can change *anywhere* at
*anytime*. The result of this is, and this is not MS specific, is that if
the company who owns the beta product decides to make a change somewhere
because it needs to for their own reasons, that all of a sudden days,
weeks, or more worth of work can be lost by work from other companies
dependant on what was changed.

This is not entirely true. There can, of course, be changes but the fact
that it is in Beta usually indicates a functionality freeze and the
alpha version has been past. It is very, very rare to see major changes
from a beta to a major release.
On top of that, in this particular scenario...you have to add in that the
drivers work completely different and a completely new and differently
working API was in the mix as well. Any of it subject to change at any
moment during the beta phase.

Very unlikely. The fact it is beta almost guarantees a relatively
concreate API suite.
So basically the bottom line is this. Until a product gets out of beta and
is released, developers cannot with confidence base their work on the beta
product.

Nothing is ideal. But developers ALWAYS work with beta and pre-releases
in order to get there product compatible with the new version.
And in case of MS, I've even seen them drop beta's entirely in the middle of
it! Managed DirectX 2.0 comes to mind which was dropped out of the clear
blue sky for the XNA Framework. Now imagine what something like that would
do to a developer creating work based on MDX2.0. It would be disastrous and
that's why developers don't do it.

Developers do it all the time. Sure this is an example of something
begin dropped - it happens. Such is life.
Being a software developer for a living myself I can't say I can blame
them.

I disagree wholeheartedly with your general comments. SW Development
companies are always working with betas and pre-releases of products in
order to familiarise themselves and get their related SW
integrated. Yes, there can be upsets - it is, after all, SW. When the
company changes the API in the beat because of otherwise unsolvable bugs
one just has to bite the bullet. It is the nature of SW development.
 
N

Nina DiBoy

Frank said:
AirRaid said:
Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.

http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html

Glad to hear this is not a Vista problem as some here said it was and
hoped it was. It's also amazing nvidia couldn't get a proper driver
since beta's of Vista have been available for over a year!
Thankfully I use only ATI and Matrox cards.
Frank

"End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista Ready"
is not meant to say."

Let me repeat this for you again:

"...poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say."

How is this not a Vista problem when drivers which don't work have a logo?

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"hahaha...oh, I do detect a hint of jealousy or what! Where Darrell
actually helps people all you do is beg for attention. Shame on you! Go
get professional psychological clinical help with your obvious problems
and stop your bandwidth sucking bullshit postings in this ng. (rip,
snort, belch, burp, chuckle)"

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 
A

Access

AirRaid said:
Nvidia Names Stability as Top Priority for Windows Vista Drivers

[ 04/12/2007 | 10:42 PM ]

An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors, admitted that the company had underestimated
resources it needed to develop proper drivers for Windows Vista, but
said the issues would be shortly resolved. Besides, the company has
outlined its priorities when developing drivers for the new operating
system (OS).

Several days after Microsoft Windows Vista operating system was
released, hundreds of end-users reported complaints about
instabilities, erratic behaviour, driver bugs and other kind of issues
that they faced because of Nvidia's ForceWare drivers designed for the
new OS. End-users with various graphics cards, including the latest
top-of-the-range GeForce 8800-series, criticized Nvidia ForceWare for
poor performance and stability, something, which logotype "Vista
Ready" is not meant to say.

One person, who wanted to remain fully anonymous, even launched a web-
site called NvidiaClassAction.org in early February to collect the
information about ForceWare issues with Windows Vista, however, in
early March the web-site has been taken down due to an unknown reason.

Nearly two months have passed since the last WHQL-certified release of
Windows Vista ForceWare drivers and there is a number of end-users who
still experience issues with their machines and the GeForce graphics
cards. But Nvidia's Keita Iada, who is responsible for content
development at the company, said in an interview with IGN web-site
that the new drivers are near.

"We're ramping up the frequency of our Vista driver releases. Users
will probably understand that we release a number of beta drivers on
our site, so we're making incremental progress. We believe that, in a
very short time we will have addressed the vast majority, if not all
of the issues. We've had teams who were working on other projects who
have mobilised to make sure that as quickly as possible we have the
drivers fixed. I'm not going to give you an exact timeframe, but it's
going to be very soon," said Mr. Iada.

The director of content management at Nvidia also explained the
reasons why the ForceWare drivers appear to have issues with the new
operating system by Microsoft. According to him, the first priority
for the company was to enable content developers with ability to
create titles for DirectX 10, which is strategically important for the
company. As a consequence, the firm underestimated resources it needed
to design drivers for end-users.

"On a high level, we had to prioritise. In our case, we have DX9,
DX10, multiple APIs, Vista and XP - the driver models are completely
different, and the DX9 and 10 drivers are completely different. Then
you have single- and multi-card SLI - there are many variables to
consider. Given that we were so far ahead with DX10 hardware, we've
had to make sure that the drivers, although not necessarily available
to a wide degree, or not stable, were good enough from a development
standpoint," Mr. Iada said.

But even though the initial priority of Nvidia when developing drivers
were content developers, right now the company has the priority of
delivering stable drivers for Vista to end-users. It is remarkable
that Nvidia even put performance of its drivers on the second place.

"We've had to balance our priorities between making sure we have
proper DX10 feature-supported drivers to facilitate development of
DX10 content, but also make sure that the end user will have a good
experience on Vista. To some degree, I think that we may have
underestimated how many resources were necessary to have a stable
Vista driver off the bat. I can assure you and your readers that our
first priority right now is not performance, not anything else; it is
stability and all the features supported on Vista," the director of
content management at Nvidia added.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/video/display/20070412224213.html

Well we all know you shouldn't upgrade to a new version of Windows before
the first service pack is released ^^
 
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C

Conor

Well we all know you shouldn't upgrade to a new version of Windows before
the first service pack is released ^^
And how will that help when the problem is the drivers and not the OS?
 
W

Wax

AirRaid said:
An official from Nvidia, a leading designer of system chipsets and
graphics processors,
<snip>


I like how they start out with that statement in light of the contents of
the article!
 
W

Wax

Conor said:
And how will that help when the problem is the drivers and not the OS?


Besides the obvious stuff sometimes associated with being an early adopter,
it's partly because enough time will have passed that most major driver
issues should be sorted out by then. I'm sure by the time the first service
pack comes out for Vista that most people's user experience will be much
improved versus someone who installed the OS as soon as it was released.
 
R

Rob Miller

Nothing better than reading an article with a bunch of unidentified
sources in it. Really makes me believe the credibility of the content.
 
T

Trimble

I hope NVIDIA will also put a lot more quality & finish emphasis in there
Geforce 8800 drivers for XP.
Automatic Fan control that does not work...Manual Fan control with only a
single global
setting ...which is not remembered so everything has to be reset each start
up.
An inability to set Refresh rates properly.
No color level hotkeys.....can't independently set color levels for Desktop
/ Video Overlay /
3D Games .
The poor image quality & VERY limited Control Panel features in the VISTA
driver I tried
settled me to not use VISTA for the foreseeable future.

After years with ATI cards I thought I'd moved to a pack of
just-out-this-week
amateurs ....Tool-tips on the wrong items...etc.
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(") mouse
 
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C

Charlie Wilkes

Glad to hear this is not a Vista problem as some here said it was and
hoped it was. It's also amazing nvidia couldn't get a proper driver
since beta's of Vista have been available for over a year! Thankfully I
use only ATI and Matrox cards. Frank

What's it like being a pimp, Frank? Do you drift off to sleep with a
satisfied smile on your face?

Microsoft earned 12.5 billion on revenues of 44 billion last year... a
28% margin.

Nvidia earned 500 million on revenues of 3 billion, a 14% margin.

Vista is by most accounts a buggy, ****ed-up operating system, and the
fact that big, fat Microsoft couldn't get it right is not mitigated by
the corresponding fact that hardware vendors like Nvidia are struggling
to come up with stable drivers.

Charlie
 
J

joey

It's one of the lamest excuses in software development history. Beta
versions of Vista have been out for ages.... Management didn't allow
developers to start on it soon enough. I hope a few of them get fired
over this.
 
R

Roscoe

Like ATI cards are worth are worth anything with Vista. They suck just as
bad as Nvidia.

I thought Matrox went out of business last century?
 
B

babaloo

It is not the drivers that suck. It is Vista that sucks.
I had more luck trying to run OS2 on the woefully underpowered 486 computers
of that day than I have running Vista now.
Vista is the worst product every issued by Microsoft, an unbelievable
fiasco.
 
?

=?Windows-1252?Q?Scotty=A9?=

babaloo said:
It is not the drivers that suck. It is Vista that sucks.
I had more luck trying to run OS2 on the woefully underpowered 486
computers of that day than I have running Vista now.
Vista is the worst product every issued by Microsoft, an unbelievable
fiasco.

what a turd you are...your best bet is to put your machine in the bin as you
have no idea how to use it
 
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J

johns

Unstable Vista drivers were not the only problem. I
tested the 9xx drivers for XP for over a year, and
nVidia refused to fix the obvious bugs. For one,
you can't dial in custom settings using the 9xx
drivers for XP. I would call nVidia tech support, and
they would lie right in my face about it. I caught
them on every single lie, and then they would try
to turn it into a "stupid user" ploy. I caught them
on that too, and proved to their tech guys that
I was right, and even showed them a hack to
make custom settings work. I also showed them
how the 8xx drivers could do custom settings
fine .. and the problem was exclusive to all of
their 9xx drivers. Guess what ! The 9xx drivers
for XP are still broke .. going on over a year now.

johns
 
N

No One

babaloo said:
It is not the drivers that suck. It is Vista that sucks.
I had more luck trying to run OS2 on the woefully underpowered 486 computers
of that day than I have running Vista now.
Vista is the worst product every issued by Microsoft, an unbelievable
fiasco.

Agreed. Perhaps the last full OS from Micro$oft.
 
J

joey

It is not the drivers that suck. It is Vista that sucks.

Spoken by a true technology expert (yawn).

It's not Vista that interacts with the video card. The code between
the graphics system of the of an operating system and the driver is
all the same. The driver lies between the OS and the video card, and
the driver is where people are having problems. Drivers are written
by video card vendors, not Microsoft.
Vista is the worst product every issued by Microsoft, an unbelievable
fiasco.

People said the same thing about XP at first.
 
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C

Conor

Like ATI cards are worth are worth anything with Vista. They suck just as
bad as Nvidia.

I thought Matrox went out of business last century?
No. THey just realised there was no point in trying to compete in the
3D gaming market and carried on in the niche sector for which they were
known. A good call IMO as it's saved them a shitload of money in R&D in
a game they could never win.
 

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