Network Topology


H

Harkhof

I have what I suppose is a fairly elementary question. I have a network with
3 PCs. I have a cable modem connected to a Linksys BEFSR41 4 port router.
Out of port 1, I have a cable going to a netgear gigabit network switch, to
which I have the 3 PCs connected. One is in a different room.

I want to add another PC in the 'different room'. My questions are:

1) Does the fact that I have the Netgear switch connected to the #1 port on
the router instead of the uplink impact network performance in any way?

2) Rather than run another network cable to the 'different room', can I just
plug the existing cable into a port on the netgear switch and add another
gigabit switch in the 'different room' and run both computers off of the new
switch?

Thanks in advance,
Hark
 
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J

Jerry

Stop using the netgear gigabit switch and just plug all the computers into
the router.
 
H

Harkhof

Jerry said:
Stop using the netgear gigabit switch and just plug all the computers into
the router.

Hi, and thanks for the response, but I'd rather not, since the router is
10/100 and the netgear is 10/100/1000. How would your suggestion improve my
network?

Thanks,
Hark
 
C

Chuck

I have what I suppose is a fairly elementary question. I have a network with
3 PCs. I have a cable modem connected to a Linksys BEFSR41 4 port router.
Out of port 1, I have a cable going to a netgear gigabit network switch, to
which I have the 3 PCs connected. One is in a different room.

I want to add another PC in the 'different room'. My questions are:

1) Does the fact that I have the Netgear switch connected to the #1 port on
the router instead of the uplink impact network performance in any way?

2) Rather than run another network cable to the 'different room', can I just
plug the existing cable into a port on the netgear switch and add another
gigabit switch in the 'different room' and run both computers off of the new
switch?

Thanks in advance,
Hark

Hark,

1) The "Uplink" port on a router is typically a straight-thru port to allow it
to connect to another router. If it works, then it won't damage performance.
The ports on the switches are probably auto-MDIX, which means they work with
either a cross-over or straight-thru port at the other end of the cable.

2) You can indeed connect the 2 computers in the other room with a GB switch.
You'll probably get GB performance between them; depending upon what cables you
are using, you may or may not get the same between that room and the computers
in the room with the router. You won't get GB performance with anything
connected to the router.
 
H

Harkhof

Chuck said:
Hark,

1) The "Uplink" port on a router is typically a straight-thru port to
allow it
to connect to another router. If it works, then it won't damage
performance.
The ports on the switches are probably auto-MDIX, which means they work
with
either a cross-over or straight-thru port at the other end of the cable.

2) You can indeed connect the 2 computers in the other room with a GB
switch.
You'll probably get GB performance between them; depending upon what
cables you
are using, you may or may not get the same between that room and the
computers
in the room with the router. You won't get GB performance with anything
connected to the router.

Hi Chuck,

Thanks for the concise answer. Exactly what I needed to know.

Thanks again,
Hark
 
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