Linux World - a smorgasbord of penguins !


Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
GUI To Batch Rename Files On Linux With Exif And Music Tags Support: Inviska Rename



is a free and open source GUI batch file rename utility for Linux, Mac and Windows.
Besides the usual rename functions like replacing a portion of the text with some other text, inserting or removing text, renaming file extensions, and so on, this tool can rename folders, rename music based on tags, and rename photos using their Exif information. It can even batch rename using file attributes like the creation or modification date.
https://www.inviska.com/rename/

Inviska Rename can perform the following operations:

  • Insert, remove and replace text in filename or extension.
  • Rename using music tag information, such as mp3 ID3v2 tags, FLAC tags and other audio tags.
  • Rename using Exif information from digital photographs.
  • Rename using file creation or modification date.
  • Automatically number files for easy ordering.
  • Change filename to uppercase, lowercase, title case or sentence case.
  • Filter items to be renamed based on extension, selection, files only or folders only.
  • Save common rename settings for frequent tasks.
  • Undo previous rename operation to restore original filenames.
  • Show/hide hidden files to include/exclude them from rename operations.
  • Navigate through directories in preview list to locate the files you wish to rename.
  • Easily see which filenames will be changed with highlighting of modified filenames in the preview pane.
  • View tags present in file (Exif screenshot, Music screenshot) and edit music tags before renaming.
  • Rename in any language thanks to full Unicode support.
  • Cross platform, running on Windows 7+, macOS 10.12+ and Linux.
  • Free open-source software released under the GPLv2+ licence.

You should take note of below if running this on a penguin.

https://www.inviska.com/rename/changelog.html

Version 7.0

  • Switched to AppImage - The Linux build is now distributed as an AppImage. I'll look to add a Flatpak in the future, and possibly a Snap. The AppImage has been tested to work on Linux Mint 18.0, 19.0 & 19.1, Ubuntu 16.04, 18.04 & 19.04, Debian 9.1.0, OpenSUSE 15 & Leap, Fedora 30, Manjaro and Antergos. Note that, after downloading, you will have to make the AppImage executable to run it.
  • Portable AppImage - A portable version of the AppImage is available which stores the settings in the application directory.
  • Dropped .deb, .rpm and .pkg.tar.xz packages - For various reasons I've decided to drop the traditional package formats and will move towards newer formats, like Flatpak.
I will give this a whirl at some time and report back as I think it would be a very useful tool.

Enjoy :cool:
 
Ad

Advertisements

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
Valve gives Ubuntu the boot :eek:

Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais working on Steam for Linux announced that they will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release, as well as future Ubuntu Linux releases.



Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases.
The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users.
"Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users. We will evaluate ways to minimize breakage for existing users, but will also switch our focus to a different distribution, currently TBD," said Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais.
Remember WINE also uses 32 Bit stuff, soooooooooooooooooooo,

Canonical returning 32-bit Ubuntu Linux support after gaming uproar

32-bit software should be functionally obsolete, but it turns out to live on in a 64-bit computing world. So, Canonical is putting 32-bit libraries back in to its next Ubuntu Linux releases.



There are few--if any--people demanding new Linux versions for their antique i386 PCs.Linux itself dropped support for the seminal 32-bit processor in 2012. At the time, Linus Torvalds bid 32-bit Linux good-bye saying, "I'm not sentimental. Good riddance."


Ubuntu developer Will Cooke explained that while "386 makes up around 1% of the Ubuntu install base," the potential problems were larger. While the 32-bit operating system are history, it turns out, 32-bit software libraries have lived on, and some very popular programs -- mostly games -- still use them. Developers and Ubuntu users were not happy.



It's been known for some time that both Steam and Wine depended on archaic 32-bit libraries. "On the list of known blockers for removing the i386 port are Steam and Wine." It also appears that some drivers -- in particular for older Brother printers -- are only functional with 32-bit libraries.

In the meantime, a bit of testing by Alan Pope, a Canonical developer advocate, found that some existing Steam and Wine programs won't run on beta Ubuntu 19.10. Ubuntu developers worried --naturally enough -- that this will make some Linux desktop users drop Ubuntu.



Moving forward, Canonical has decided "it's relatively easy for us to change plans and enable natively in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS the applications for which there is a specific need."
Canonical also stated it "work with the WINE, Ubuntu Studio and gaming communities to use container technology to address the ultimate end of life of 32-bit libraries; it should stay possible to run old applications on newer versions of Ubuntu. Snaps and LXD enable us both to have complete 32-bit environments, and bundled libraries, to solve these issues in the long term."
So if they knew Wine and Steam needed 32 Bit stuff why on earth did they drop the 32 Bit stuff ? hat a bunch of total D***H**ds. :rolleyes:

Storm in a teacup over and done with in less than 24 hours, blink and you would have missed it. :cool:
 

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
10 PRINT Memorial in New Hampshire marks the birthplace of BASIC


"After just over 55 years, the birthplace of BASIC has been honoured with a memorial marker in New Hampshire, USA.

Thanks to a campaign by local paper columnist David Brooks, the New Hampshire Historical Highway Marker was installed earlier this month.

Professor John Kemeny, Maths professor Thomas Kurtz, and a group undergraduate students at Dartmouth College (pics) created BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code). The first program ran on 1 May 1964.

They also created time-sharing to open up access to all students at the college. The idea was that the computers should be used by all students, not just those studying technical subjects.

The marker was going to include both these achievements but they wouldn't fit onto a small road sign."

13144
 

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
10 ways to get started with Linux

"The article What is a Linux user? by Anderson Silva made it clear that these days people are as likely to use Linux (in some way) as they are to use Windows, as long as your definition of "using Linux" is sufficiently broad. Still, if you don't have enough Linux in your life, now is a great time to try Linux in a way you've never tried before.

Here are 10 ways to get started with Linux. Try one or try them all."

Neat article.

:cool:



 

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
5 tiny Linux distros to try before you die

Resurrect an ancient machine, boot a broken system, or ensure a safe public computing session with these tiny Linux distros.

"There are plenty of Linux distributions out there to choose from when you're deciding what to run on a daily basis, yet some are so small that they get little notice. But tiny Linux distributions are powerful innovations: having an entire operating system drive a computer with less than 1GB of storage and half as much RAM is the ultimate software hack.

Tiny distros have many uses, such as:

  • Save old and slow computers from the rubbish bin. Reject planned obsolescence and use computers until they fall apart, not just until they start to feel slow.
  • Boot broken or corrupted systems from a thumb drive to recover data or repair boot partitions.
  • Ensure a safe and private environment when on a public computer. If you boot a public computer in a hotel lobby or a library from a thumb drive, you'll know your operating environment is secure."


I have over the years tried all five of the distros mentioned and had a great deal of fun with them. I have also used them to rescue a borked install, run them on pc's with no hard drives and even run some from a sd card.

Enjoy.

:cool:
 
Ad

Advertisements

Abarbarian

Acruncher
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
10,498
Reaction score
956
Immutable Linux with Silverblue: My favorite superpower


Silverblue is basically a version of Fedora. There’s one key difference, however, which is that the operating system is mounted read-only, meaning that it’s immutable.

What does "immutable" mean? It means that it can’t be changed. To be more accurate, in a software context, it generally means that something can’t be changed during run time.
In Silverblue’s case, it’s the operating system that’s immutable. You install applications in containers (more on this later) using Flatpak, rather than onto the root filesystem. This means not only that the installation of applications is isolated from the core filesystem, but also that the ability for malicious applications to compromise your system is significantly reduced.
This approach also makes it easy to maintain different versions of an operating system or installations with different sets of packages. If you need to test an application in a particular environment, you boot into the image that reflects that environment and do the testing. Another environment? Another image.
Silverblue Fedora 30 has been released today!


Before we chose the name Team Silverblue, the team was the Fedora Atomic Workstation SIG, and the Atomic Workstation is what we are producing, now under its new name, Silverblue. At its core, it is a variant of the Fedora Workstation which uses rpm-ostree to provide an immutable OS image with reliable updates and easy rollbacks.


The concrete goals of the Team Silverblue project are to provide excellent support for container-based workflows and make Silverblue the preferred variant of Fedora Workstation.
This is a very interesting development by Fedora.

:cool:



 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top