Kyocera Network Printer Problem


G

Garry Douglas

I have a three machine wireless network connected via a Belkin 4 port
wireless router and I have a Kyocera FS-1050 laser printer which is
currently attached to one of the machines (the one hard wired to the router)
via USB. The printer can be used remotely as a shared device by the other
two machines which are connected by wireless adaptors.

However, the printer also has a n/w interface board installed and I would
like to connect it directly to my 4 port router so that I can access the
printer from the laptops without always having the desktop
machine powered on, but when I have connected the printer to the router via
an ethernet patch cable I can't detect it. I have also tried using a cross
over cable but with the same lack of success.

Just because the printer has a network board installed, does this
necessarily mean that it functions as a print server or would I need an
additional device between the router and printer? The manual doesn't mention
the network board in detail so I assume that it was an optional extra (the
printer is a pre-owned model) and I can't find any useful information on the
Kyocera site. I printed out the printer menu map but this also doesn't
contain any useful information.

If the n/w board does act as a print server, would it have a fixed IP
address until configured otherwise and/or should it be possible to set it so
that it obtains the IP address automatically from the DHCP server?

I am running XP Pro SP2 on all the machines. The IP address for the Belkin
router is 192.168.2.1 and DHCP is enabled. I have tried entering several IP
addresses from 192.168.2.3 onwards (the first address in the IP range set on
the router) in the hope that it might bring up a configuration screen but so
far nothing.

Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks

Garry (London, England)
 
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W

Warren Block

Garry Douglas said:
I have a three machine wireless network connected via a Belkin 4 port
wireless router and I have a Kyocera FS-1050 laser printer which is
currently attached to one of the machines (the one hard wired to the router)
via USB. The printer can be used remotely as a shared device by the other
two machines which are connected by wireless adaptors.

However, the printer also has a n/w interface board installed and I would
like to connect it directly to my 4 port router so that I can access the
printer from the laptops without always having the desktop
machine powered on, but when I have connected the printer to the router via
an ethernet patch cable I can't detect it.

Depends on the built-in print server. Old ones may not even speak
TCP/IP. The Kyocera web page has some downloads for the 1030; the print
server might be similar. Check the network board for a model number.
I have also tried using a cross
over cable but with the same lack of success.

Don't use a crossover.
Just because the printer has a network board installed, does this
necessarily mean that it functions as a print server or would I need
an additional device between the router and printer?

It should be a print server, but depends on the age. Some old ones
required a TFTP server to boot.
If the n/w board does act as a print server, would it have a fixed IP
address until configured otherwise and/or should it be possible to set it so
that it obtains the IP address automatically from the DHCP server?

Unknown. Check the Kyocera site.
 
G

Garry Douglas

Warren Block said:
Depends on the built-in print server. Old ones may not even speak
TCP/IP. The Kyocera web page has some downloads for the 1030; the > print
server might be similar. Check the network board for a model
number.

I will look again on the Kyocera site. I printed the status page and the n/w
interface is a SB-110.

The IP address, subnet mask and gateway are all reported as 000.000.000.000

ARP/PING, BOOTP, RARP and DHCP are all on.
Don't use a crossover.

That's what I thought but someone on another forum (not a ng) recommended a
x over!
It should be a print server, but depends on the age. Some old ones
required a TFTP server to boot.

Thanks for the advice.

Garry
 
G

Garry Douglas

I will look again on the Kyocera site. I printed the status page and the
n/w interface is a SB-110.

There is a utility for the SB-110 on the Kyocera site called KyoNetCon. Once
installed it allows you to force the IP address of the printer, then you can
add it as you would any network printer. After the IP address is assigned
you can also access the printer configuration via IE or the browser of your
choice as you would do for a router or ethernet modem.

Something finally worked today and it's only 3.24 a.m. :)

Garry
 
P

phineaspaine

I will look again on the Kyocera site. I printed the status page and the n/w
interface is a SB-110.

The IP address, subnet mask and gateway are all reported as 000.000.000.000

ARP/PING, BOOTP, RARP and DHCP are all on.


That's what I thought but someone on another forum (not a ng) recommended a
x over!


Thanks for the advice.

Garry

DHCP isn't recommended for use with a printer, since the IP address
doesn't always remain the same. DCHP is, after all, dynamic in
nature. You should set the printer up with a static IP address that
is within the internal network set up within your router, but outside
the range of IP addresses assignable by the DHCP server in your
router. This way your computers won't ever "stomp" on your printer's
IP address by taking it as their own. For example, you state your
router's configuration as:

Belkin router IP: 192.168.2.1 (this is your router's IP)

I'm going to assume that your router's subnet mask for the internal
network is: 255.255.255.0

The router IP in combination with the subnet mask defines the size of
the network, i.e. 192.168.2.0 - 192.168.2.255. However, you should
never use 192.168.2.0 (this is reserved to identify the network, i.e.
netid), and you should never use 192.168.2.255 (this is reserved as
the network's broadcast address to communicate message between devices
on the network, such as ARP queries, i.e when your router queries what
devices are connected to it). All devices connected to this router
will either be assigned the same network subnet mask via DHCP, or must
have it manually configured, so they all know the boundaries of the
network to which they're connected.

Within the router, you can define how many IP's that DHCP can assign
to connected devices, and the starting address. If you state 50,
starting at 192.168.2.100, then the router's DHCP server can issue
addresses to up to 50 devices in the range 192.168.2.100 thru
192.168.2.49. Your computers using DHCP will receive an IP address
anywhere within this range, but usually it's sequential, i.e. the
first will get 100, the next 101, etc.

Your printer should be manually configured with an IP address outside
this DHCP range. Using the above example, any address between
192.168.2.2 thru 192.168.2.99, or 192.168.2.150 thru 192.168.254 would
be acceptable. Let's use 192.168.2.200.

If you don't have a service manual for your printer, you can find one
here:
http://www.alice-dsl.net/spritzer/pdf/Kyocera-FS-1050.pdf

Other manuals at Kyocera's EU site:
http://www.kyoceramita.eu/index/service/dlc.false._.FS1050.PRINT.EN.html#

Configure the printer through it's menu panel with the following
values:
TCP/IP: ON
DHCP: ON (leave it on, it shouldn't hurt)
IP address: 192.168.2.200
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.2.1 (yes, this is the router's address)

The gateway value tells the printer which device to go to in order to
access the network, i.e. the router.

Once you've set up the printer, you should be able to access it's web-
based configuration menu by opening an IE browser window, and keying
in the IP in the address field. This will confirm it's presence on
your network.

Now you should install (if not already installed) and configure the
Kyocera FS-1050 windows printer driver on each computer to access the
printer via it's IP address, i.e. 192.168.2.200. Use "add a printer"
and specify a local network-attached printer. You can specify the IP
address in the URL field.

This should get it up and running on your internal network.
Hope I didn't forget anything...;-)

Phineas
 
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G

Garry Douglas

This should get it up and running on your internal network.
Hope I didn't forget anything...;-)

No, that was very comprehensive. I wish I had seen your post before I went
about setting up the printer on the network by hit and miss/trial and error
(also known as plug and pray) :)

I set the printer to have a fixed IP 192.168.2.2 via the KyoNetCon utility
and then enabled DHCP on the router to assign addresses from 192.168.2.3.

The only real difference to your recommendations is that I left the
"Multicast router as gateway" option selected in the TCP/IP configuration on
the printer instead of entering the Router IP address (192.168.2.1) and it
seems to be working. I was able to set up the printer as a shared device on
all three machines and I can now print from both laptops without the desktop
being on.

Thanks for your help.

Garry
 
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