J5 Create USB to HDMI Device


J

JCO

System: Older PC Running XP Home with all updates.

Does anybody have experience using this device?

I want to move an old computer upstairs and place it next to the TV where it
can be connected to my TV. This will allow me to watch downloaded videos on
the TV from the computer. Typically, if connected with an HDMI cable, I
should be able to get video and sound to the TV.

I can get Internet via wireless card but don't have an HDMI connection on
the computer. The computer only has standard PCI Slots (no AGP and no PCI
Express). I don't want to dump to much money into the system but a standard
PCI video card with HDMI output would be ideal. Having no luck finding this
PCI card, I ran across the "J5 Create USB to HDMI" Connector. The problem
is that I have never read anything that says sound will transfer from via
HDMI from the computer to the TV.

Does anyone know if sound, along with the video, be transferred through this
HDMI cable so that my TV will display and use the TV Speakers?

Thanks
 
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P

Paul

JCO said:
System: Older PC Running XP Home with all updates.

Does anybody have experience using this device?

I want to move an old computer upstairs and place it next to the TV
where it can be connected to my TV. This will allow me to watch
downloaded videos on the TV from the computer. Typically, if connected
with an HDMI cable, I should be able to get video and sound to the TV.

I can get Internet via wireless card but don't have an HDMI connection
on the computer. The computer only has standard PCI Slots (no AGP and
no PCI Express). I don't want to dump to much money into the system but
a standard PCI video card with HDMI output would be ideal. Having no
luck finding this PCI card, I ran across the "J5 Create USB to HDMI"
Connector. The problem is that I have never read anything that says
sound will transfer from via HDMI from the computer to the TV.

Does anyone know if sound, along with the video, be transferred through
this HDMI cable so that my TV will display and use the TV Speakers?

Thanks

Would a media extender work ?

"WD TV Live Media Player WDBHG70000NBK-HESN"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136997

Read the customer reviews first, to see what it can do.

I think there's even a user manual link on that page.

*******

The USB to HDMI adapters, the older ones didn't really support video
playback. The data on the cable was compressed by the CPU, and USB2
was too slow for video. There are some USB3 versions now, and a
recent review said you could watch video OK. But then, the computer
might need a decent CPU, to do all of that work to push video
to the TV set.

*******

I would also take a second look, at the back of the TV set, and
at the connectors on the computer, to see if there is some other
interconnect method that might work.

To give an example, I have a DVD player that has composite on
the back. I have a TV set with composite-in. Running a coax, the
picture looks terrible (probably a DC restoration problem). Now,
if I stick a Radio Shack RF modulator in the path (DVD player
to RF modulator, RF modulator to antenna terminal on the TV set),
I actually get a better looking picture, than if using direct
composite connection. So that's how I chose to get a picture to
a really cheesy TV set. If yours has HDMI, it might have
some other connectors that would mate with the computer.
(VGA, YPbPr component)

And the computer, having only a PCI bus, may be too weak to
play all possible movie formats. Even my computer, the CPU
usage varies anywhere from 15% to 100%, for playing the same
video file, with a number of different player applications.
So the thing is, if the computer has a weak CPU, there might
not be any point of even bothering with cabling and toys.
Test the computer first, to see if it has enough
horsepower for the job.

If you use something other than HDMI, then you can just
use the analog sound output on the computer. Run a
1/8" stereo male cable to dual RCA (Cinch) on the other
end, and use that to get audio into the TV set.

Paul
 
J

JCO

You are correct. Thanks for the help.
I will continue to look for a video card instead.

"Paul" wrote in message
System: Older PC Running XP Home with all updates.

Does anybody have experience using this device?

I want to move an old computer upstairs and place it next to the TV
where it can be connected to my TV. This will allow me to watch
downloaded videos on the TV from the computer. Typically, if connected
with an HDMI cable, I should be able to get video and sound to the TV.

I can get Internet via wireless card but don't have an HDMI connection
on the computer. The computer only has standard PCI Slots (no AGP and
no PCI Express). I don't want to dump to much money into the system but
a standard PCI video card with HDMI output would be ideal. Having no
luck finding this PCI card, I ran across the "J5 Create USB to HDMI"
Connector. The problem is that I have never read anything that says
sound will transfer from via HDMI from the computer to the TV.

Does anyone know if sound, along with the video, be transferred through
this HDMI cable so that my TV will display and use the TV Speakers?

Thanks

Would a media extender work ?

"WD TV Live Media Player WDBHG70000NBK-HESN"
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136997

Read the customer reviews first, to see what it can do.

I think there's even a user manual link on that page.

*******

The USB to HDMI adapters, the older ones didn't really support video
playback. The data on the cable was compressed by the CPU, and USB2
was too slow for video. There are some USB3 versions now, and a
recent review said you could watch video OK. But then, the computer
might need a decent CPU, to do all of that work to push video
to the TV set.

*******

I would also take a second look, at the back of the TV set, and
at the connectors on the computer, to see if there is some other
interconnect method that might work.

To give an example, I have a DVD player that has composite on
the back. I have a TV set with composite-in. Running a coax, the
picture looks terrible (probably a DC restoration problem). Now,
if I stick a Radio Shack RF modulator in the path (DVD player
to RF modulator, RF modulator to antenna terminal on the TV set),
I actually get a better looking picture, than if using direct
composite connection. So that's how I chose to get a picture to
a really cheesy TV set. If yours has HDMI, it might have
some other connectors that would mate with the computer.
(VGA, YPbPr component)

And the computer, having only a PCI bus, may be too weak to
play all possible movie formats. Even my computer, the CPU
usage varies anywhere from 15% to 100%, for playing the same
video file, with a number of different player applications.
So the thing is, if the computer has a weak CPU, there might
not be any point of even bothering with cabling and toys.
Test the computer first, to see if it has enough
horsepower for the job.

If you use something other than HDMI, then you can just
use the analog sound output on the computer. Run a
1/8" stereo male cable to dual RCA (Cinch) on the other
end, and use that to get audio into the TV set.

Paul
 
J

John McGaw

System: Older PC Running XP Home with all updates.

Does anybody have experience using this device?

I want to move an old computer upstairs and place it next to the TV where
it can be connected to my TV. This will allow me to watch downloaded
videos on the TV from the computer. Typically, if connected with an HDMI
cable, I should be able to get video and sound to the TV.

I can get Internet via wireless card but don't have an HDMI connection on
the computer. The computer only has standard PCI Slots (no AGP and no PCI
Express). I don't want to dump to much money into the system but a
standard PCI video card with HDMI output would be ideal. Having no luck
finding this PCI card, I ran across the "J5 Create USB to HDMI" Connector.
The problem is that I have never read anything that says sound will
transfer from via HDMI from the computer to the TV.

Does anyone know if sound, along with the video, be transferred through
this HDMI cable so that my TV will display and use the TV Speakers?

Thanks

Why not consider the easy cheap way:

http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Video-1080P-Converter-Adapter/dp/B008COJXHC/ref=pd_cp_e_0

Any USB port on your antique computer is not going to have the bandwidth to
produce real HDMI video, not to mention the problems with audio. This
device (which I've not used) handles the upscaling and audio encoding ad
connector conversion in a single step.
 
P

Paul

JCO said:
You are correct. Thanks for the help.
I will continue to look for a video card instead.

Yes, you can get the video card.

Geforce 210 (PCI bridged) $55

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814187206

HD 5450 (PCI bridged) $70

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131436

The PCI cards are a bit more expensive than the PCI Express
ones of the same design. You can get cards for $30 or $40
at the low end of PCI Express.

(Don't get the oldest of the cards, like an old ATI 7000, as
they have next to no hardware features. For video playback,
those old cards amount to just a frame buffer.)

The two examples above, are of relatively recent design, so have
UVD or PureVideo. The only problem with that, is the driver
for the video card, can sense it is working with the PCI
bridged version, and the driver writers decide to turn off
features like 3:2 pulldown, due to the amount of data (megabytes/sec)
that have to move through the PCI slot. But other than that, I think
you could whip together a solution with a card like that. Since
the PCI slot, on a good day, can move only 110MB/sec, that
really crimps data movement. Much of UVD or PureVideo decoding
stays inside the video card (which is good), which does not
explain why data-full parts of it, end up on the PCI bus.

UVD and PureVideo, help with movie decoding on popular formats.
Which is why they might be worth having, if your CPU isn't
that strong. And those cards are also relatively low-power.
(If you have stability issue with a fan-less card, just point
an 80mm fan at it - I needed to do that with one of my
fanless FX5200 cards years ago.)

*******

HD 5450 has UVD 2.2. A HD 6450 might have UVD 3, but then,
we don't see PCI cards with those onboard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UVD

A Geforce 210 is VP4.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purevideo

If you need some imaginative marketing material, you
can flip through this. It didn't really help me, as I
was looking for the chart of what features are turned off.

http://www.nvidia.com/content/purevideoHD/pdf/NVIDIA_GeForce_HTPC_Guide_2_8.pdf

This is the kind of chart I was looking for, but it's out
of date. Based on the comment at the bottom of the chart,
there are still some parts of video decoding, done by the
CPU and not by the video card. And since that pulls a lot
of data through the PCI slot, such features have to be turned
off on PCI bus.

http://www.nvidia.com/docs/CP/11036/PureVideo_Product_Comparison.pdf

"Enabling Inverse Telecine, Noise Reduction and Edge Enhancements
simultaneously requires additional processing power and may not
be possible without dropping frames on some graphics cards"

Of course, getting any acceleration from the video card, is
a bonus, rather than the CPU doing all of it. If you have
gutless PCs (and I have a few), one of those video cards
can help make an HTPC out of it.

So when you shop for the video card, try to get a "buzzword
compliant" card, with more options to aid in video decoding.
An ancient ATI 7000 card may be cheaper, but not as capable.

HTH,
Paul
 
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J

JCO

Awesome choices. Thanks guys.

"John McGaw" wrote in message

System: Older PC Running XP Home with all updates.

Does anybody have experience using this device?

I want to move an old computer upstairs and place it next to the TV where
it can be connected to my TV. This will allow me to watch downloaded
videos on the TV from the computer. Typically, if connected with an HDMI
cable, I should be able to get video and sound to the TV.

I can get Internet via wireless card but don't have an HDMI connection on
the computer. The computer only has standard PCI Slots (no AGP and no PCI
Express). I don't want to dump to much money into the system but a
standard PCI video card with HDMI output would be ideal. Having no luck
finding this PCI card, I ran across the "J5 Create USB to HDMI" Connector.
The problem is that I have never read anything that says sound will
transfer from via HDMI from the computer to the TV.

Does anyone know if sound, along with the video, be transferred through
this HDMI cable so that my TV will display and use the TV Speakers?

Thanks

Why not consider the easy cheap way:

http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Video-1080P-Converter-Adapter/dp/B008COJXHC/ref=pd_cp_e_0

Any USB port on your antique computer is not going to have the bandwidth to
produce real HDMI video, not to mention the problems with audio. This
device (which I've not used) handles the upscaling and audio encoding ad
connector conversion in a single step.
 
J

JCO

Will that 64 bit card work in a 32 bit machine running a WindowsXP 32 bits?
Thanks

"Paul" wrote in message
You are correct. Thanks for the help.
I will continue to look for a video card instead.

Yes, you can get the video card.

Geforce 210 (PCI bridged) $55

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814187206

HD 5450 (PCI bridged) $70

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814131436

The PCI cards are a bit more expensive than the PCI Express
ones of the same design. You can get cards for $30 or $40
at the low end of PCI Express.

(Don't get the oldest of the cards, like an old ATI 7000, as
they have next to no hardware features. For video playback,
those old cards amount to just a frame buffer.)

The two examples above, are of relatively recent design, so have
UVD or PureVideo. The only problem with that, is the driver
for the video card, can sense it is working with the PCI
bridged version, and the driver writers decide to turn off
features like 3:2 pulldown, due to the amount of data (megabytes/sec)
that have to move through the PCI slot. But other than that, I think
you could whip together a solution with a card like that. Since
the PCI slot, on a good day, can move only 110MB/sec, that
really crimps data movement. Much of UVD or PureVideo decoding
stays inside the video card (which is good), which does not
explain why data-full parts of it, end up on the PCI bus.

UVD and PureVideo, help with movie decoding on popular formats.
Which is why they might be worth having, if your CPU isn't
that strong. And those cards are also relatively low-power.
(If you have stability issue with a fan-less card, just point
an 80mm fan at it - I needed to do that with one of my
fanless FX5200 cards years ago.)

*******

HD 5450 has UVD 2.2. A HD 6450 might have UVD 3, but then,
we don't see PCI cards with those onboard.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UVD

A Geforce 210 is VP4.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purevideo

If you need some imaginative marketing material, you
can flip through this. It didn't really help me, as I
was looking for the chart of what features are turned off.

http://www.nvidia.com/content/purevideoHD/pdf/NVIDIA_GeForce_HTPC_Guide_2_8.pdf

This is the kind of chart I was looking for, but it's out
of date. Based on the comment at the bottom of the chart,
there are still some parts of video decoding, done by the
CPU and not by the video card. And since that pulls a lot
of data through the PCI slot, such features have to be turned
off on PCI bus.

http://www.nvidia.com/docs/CP/11036/PureVideo_Product_Comparison.pdf

"Enabling Inverse Telecine, Noise Reduction and Edge Enhancements
simultaneously requires additional processing power and may not
be possible without dropping frames on some graphics cards"

Of course, getting any acceleration from the video card, is
a bonus, rather than the CPU doing all of it. If you have
gutless PCs (and I have a few), one of those video cards
can help make an HTPC out of it.

So when you shop for the video card, try to get a "buzzword
compliant" card, with more options to aid in video decoding.
An ancient ATI 7000 card may be cheaper, but not as capable.

HTH,
Paul
 
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P

Paul

JCO said:
Will that 64 bit card work in a 32 bit machine running a WindowsXP 32 bits?
Thanks

The cards work in 32 bit or 64 bit machines.

With any hardware, you can research the availability of
drivers, before you buy the hardware. That's how you
convince yourself, that it'll work.

This is an example of a driver download page, and
how the drivers are available for 32 bit or 64 bit
OS. Check to see if your operating system is there.

http://imageshack.us/a/img163/7726/wh6.gif

Paul
 

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