Is Vista haunted?


G

Guest

I have an Asus Crosshair machine in the shop with the on board audio. When I
installed Vista 64 bit I had no sound and the device manager showed no sound
hardware installed. I've been travelling and when I got back I noticed the
front speakers working. Then a few days later I had full 5.1 surround sound.
All without any intervention from me. Vista is either possessed or the
greatest thing since sliced bread. All I can comment is "amazing" but I'm
glad I didn't have to tinker with it.
 
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N

nick

it probably eventually found the correct driver and installed it.

No magic involved...


"Neal at Spectdar Computing"
 
J

John Locke

I have an Asus Crosshair machine in the shop with the on board audio. When I
installed Vista 64 bit I had no sound and the device manager showed no sound
hardware installed. I've been travelling and when I got back I noticed the
front speakers working. Then a few days later I had full 5.1 surround sound.
All without any intervention from me. Vista is either possessed or the
greatest thing since sliced bread. All I can comment is "amazing" but I'm
glad I didn't have to tinker with it.

Probably took a few days for the sound to work its way through Vista'a
DRM code. Try a DVD. Will probably be a month before you get any
video.
 
S

Shane Nokes

Vista doesn't have "DRM code" *sighs*

It has a framework that allows HD content to play if it requires DRM so that
it's compliant with the calls made by that media.

It doesn't add DRM to anything.
 
N

Nina DiBoy

Shane said:
Vista doesn't have "DRM code" *sighs*

Yes it does *sighs*

Do you know what DRM is? Have you looked it up? According to MS, this
is the definition of DRM"

http://www.microsoft.com/security/glossary.mspx#digital_rights_management

digital rights management (DRM)
Any technology used to protect the interests of owners of content and
services (such as copyright owners). Typically, authorized recipients or
users must acquire a license in order to consume the protected
material—files, music, movies—according to the rights or business rules
set by the content owner.

Are you saying that Vista does not have any code or technology in it
"used to protect the interests of owners of content..." (finish reading
above definition)?!?
It has a framework that allows HD content to play if it requires DRM so
that it's compliant with the calls made by that media.

It doesn't add DRM to anything.



--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"DRM is not added to anything in Vista."

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 
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S

Shane Nokes

Once again you fail to read :(

I also am fully aware of what DRM is and have been for over 10 years (yes it
has been around for a long time)

I'll break it down like I would to a toddler since that's the level of
comprehension around here these days.

Vista has a common framework built into it that will handle calls from
DRM'ed materials and using that framework will either allow the content to
be viewed/heard or not depending on how you meet the requirements set by the
producer of the content.

The OS does NOT decide these requirements, the producers do.

So once again, Vista does not create DRM restrictions, it merely enforces
the ones in place to make sure that you can view/hear your content.

It DOES NOT add DRM to any materials that do not contain the DRM restriction
on the media.

That is MY FINAL post on this subject.
 

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