Is a Seagate 300Gb Ultra ATA/100 IDE int hd compatible with my pc?


G

Guest

Hi,

I purchased Seagate 300Gb Ultra ATA/100 IDE int hd at eBay (no refunds
allowed). I thought that I had purchased only an IDE int hd. This is what
the eBay ad said:

" Seagate 300 GB ATA IDE Hard Drive (NOT Serial ATA) Model

Brand Seagate
Series Barracuda 7200.8
Model ST3300831A
Capacity 300GB
Cache 8MB
RPM 7200 RPM
Average Seek Time 8ms
Average Latency 4.16ms
Interface IDE Ultra ATA100
Physical Spec: Form Factor 3.5"
Features: Features SoftSonic motor, RoHS-compliant, Enhanced G-Force
Protection
Warranty: Manufacturer Warranty 5 Years

Retail Box Includes:
Seagate 300GB Internal EIDE Ultra ATA/100 7200RPM Hard Drive w/8MB Cache
40 pin, 80-conductor Interface Cable
Jumpers and Screws
DiscWizard installation software
SeaTools diagnostic software
Installation guide "


Someone built my pc for me but he is no longer available so I have no manual
for it. I have Windows XP, SP2.

A Belarc reports says that I have:
ECS K7S5A mobo
C drive is a Maxtor 6E040L0 (41.11 GB), drive 0, rev NAR61590.
80Gb WDC WD800JB-00ETA0 hard drive, rev 77.07W77.

Controllers:
Standard floppy disk controller
Primary IDE Channel [Controller]
Secondary IDE Channel [Controller]
SiS PCI IDE Controller

Display:
RADEON 8500 / RADEON 8500 LE (Microsoft Corporation) [Display adapter]

Bus Adapters:
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (2x)
VIA Rev 5 or later USB Universal Host Companion Controller (2x)
VIA USB Enhanced Host Controller

Other Devices:
OHCI Compliant IEEE 1394 Host Controller
Easy Internet Keyboard
Maxtor 1394 Storage Front Panel (3x)
Maxtor OneTouch II (3x)
Microsoft PS/2 Mouse
SBP2 Compliant IEEE 1394 device (3x)
USB Root Hub (5x)

Microsoft Security Hotfixes:
All required security hotfixes (using the 03/14/2006 Microsoft Security
Bulletin Summary) have been installed.


I purchased the Seagate to replace the 80Gb hd. I just opened the box and
was going to install it when I saw that it is physically larger than the one
that I wanted to replace. Do you know if an Ultra ATA/100 IDE hd will work
in my pc?

Denise
 
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T

Thomas Wendell

In what direction larger?? If only thicker, then it should fit...

If your BIOS can handle a big disk, you shouldn't have any problem.
Remember, on XP, at least SP1 is needed, SP2 recommended..


--
Tumppi
=================================
Most learned on these newsgroups
Helsinki, FINLAND
(translations from/to FI not always accurate
=================================
 
B

Bob Knowlden

I'm confused.

According to Seagate, the dimensions of a 300 GB 7200.8 "Barracuda" are the
same as those of an 80 GB WDC WD800JB. Both are standard 3.5" drives, 1"
high. If you have the drives you're supposed to, I don't know why you'd see
any size difference.

Your mainboard's manual is available for download:

http://www.ecs.com.tw/ECSWeb/Downloads/Category_Download.aspx?Categoryid=1&MenuID=35&LanID=9

(link may wrap). The K7S5A is a Socket 462 mainboard. The only sticky bit is
that there are three versions of the K7S5A present, plus the K7S5A2. The
oldest rev. (1.1) claims to support 100 MHz UDMA drives, so the Barracuda
ought to be compatible.

You may need to update the BIOS to get LBA48 (drive > 137 GB) support. For
that, you'll need to find the correct mainboard version. A little time spent
with Google should find all that you'll need.


Address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

HartsVideo said:
Hi,

I purchased Seagate 300Gb Ultra ATA/100 IDE int hd at eBay (no refunds
allowed). I thought that I had purchased only an IDE int hd. This is
what
the eBay ad said:

" Seagate 300 GB ATA IDE Hard Drive (NOT Serial ATA) Model

Brand Seagate
Series Barracuda 7200.8
Model ST3300831A
Capacity 300GB
Cache 8MB
RPM 7200 RPM
Average Seek Time 8ms
Average Latency 4.16ms
Interface IDE Ultra ATA100
Physical Spec: Form Factor 3.5"
Features: Features SoftSonic motor, RoHS-compliant, Enhanced G-Force
Protection
Warranty: Manufacturer Warranty 5 Years

Retail Box Includes:
Seagate 300GB Internal EIDE Ultra ATA/100 7200RPM Hard Drive w/8MB Cache
40 pin, 80-conductor Interface Cable
Jumpers and Screws
DiscWizard installation software
SeaTools diagnostic software
Installation guide "


Someone built my pc for me but he is no longer available so I have no
manual
for it. I have Windows XP, SP2.

A Belarc reports says that I have:
ECS K7S5A mobo
C drive is a Maxtor 6E040L0 (41.11 GB), drive 0, rev NAR61590.
80Gb WDC WD800JB-00ETA0 hard drive, rev 77.07W77.

Controllers:
Standard floppy disk controller
Primary IDE Channel [Controller]
Secondary IDE Channel [Controller]
SiS PCI IDE Controller

Display:
RADEON 8500 / RADEON 8500 LE (Microsoft Corporation) [Display adapter]

Bus Adapters:
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller (2x)
VIA Rev 5 or later USB Universal Host Companion Controller (2x)
VIA USB Enhanced Host Controller

Other Devices:
OHCI Compliant IEEE 1394 Host Controller
Easy Internet Keyboard
Maxtor 1394 Storage Front Panel (3x)
Maxtor OneTouch II (3x)
Microsoft PS/2 Mouse
SBP2 Compliant IEEE 1394 device (3x)
USB Root Hub (5x)

Microsoft Security Hotfixes:
All required security hotfixes (using the 03/14/2006 Microsoft Security
Bulletin Summary) have been installed.


I purchased the Seagate to replace the 80Gb hd. I just opened the box and
was going to install it when I saw that it is physically larger than the
one
that I wanted to replace. Do you know if an Ultra ATA/100 IDE hd will
work
in my pc?

Denise
 
G

Guest

Thanks for responding Tom. I have SP2 installed. I didn't take the drive
out of the inner package yet because I want to by an anti-static wrist band
before I handle it to install it, but it just looks higher, not longer or
width-wise. The BIOS is something I'm going to have to check up on. I'm not
sure if I have to update it.

I appreciate your assistance :)

Denise
 
G

Guest

Hi Bob . . . Thanks for you input. I didn't take the drive out of the inner
package yet. It looks larger inside the package. I looked around the net
and in the software of my pc and this is the info that I received:

The Device Manager > System Devices says that I have:
SIS PCI to ISA bridge
SIS Processor to AGP Controller
SiS 735/733 Host CPU Bridge

A DxDiag Report says that I have:
System Manufacturer: ECS
System Model: K7S5A
BIOS: Version 1.00

I recently purchased additional RAM through Crucial and the Crucial Report
says that I have: Computer Model K7S5A (Rev 3.X)

The ECS website has different specs/settings/drivers/etc for Rev 3.1 and Rev
3.1B.

Searching around the net, I only found one site that has the best comparison
to the mobo that I have. It's says that it's a "ECS K7S5A SiS 735
Motherboard." The specs that it gives are:

Motherboard Specifications
CPU Socket: Socket A (200/266 MHz Support)
Chipset: SiS 735
Form Factor: ATX
Multiplier Options: 5.5 - 12.5x (Default CPU only)
Bus Speed Options: 100, 112, 133, 138, 150 MHz
Voltages: 1.35v - 1.85v (default CPU only)
Memory Support: 2 x 184-pin DDR DRAM PC1600/PC2100 Support,
2 x 168-pin SDRAM PC100/PC133 Support
Expansion Slots: 5/0/1/1 (PCI/ISA/AGP/AMR)
AGP Support: 4x AGP
USB Support: 2x Standard USB ports, 2x Add-on USB ports
Integrated Components: AC'97 Audio
10/100 Network Interface
Bios: AMI BIOS
Onboard IDE: 2 x ATA100 EIDE


None of the sites can tell me the mobo model. I have to select a model and
the site will give me the info about it. Without knowing which mobo that I
have, I would have to guess and hope that my guess was right, which I
wouldn't do. Is there any way that I can definitely determine the mobo model?

Denise
 
R

Richard Urban

None of the sites can tell me the mobo model. I have to select a model and
the site will give me the info about it. Without knowing which mobo that
I
have, I would have to guess and hope that my guess was right, which I
wouldn't do. Is there any way that I can definitely determine the mobo
model?

Denise

K7S5A "is" the M/B model. Try typing it into Google search. There are many
hits. Such as this one: http://www.ocworkbench.com/2002/ecs/k7s5aguide/

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

Quote from George Ankner:
If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
 
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A

Anna

HartsVideo said:
Hi Bob . . . Thanks for you input. I didn't take the drive out of the
inner
package yet. It looks larger inside the package. I looked around the net
and in the software of my pc and this is the info that I received:

The Device Manager > System Devices says that I have:
SIS PCI to ISA bridge
SIS Processor to AGP Controller
SiS 735/733 Host CPU Bridge

A DxDiag Report says that I have:
System Manufacturer: ECS
System Model: K7S5A
BIOS: Version 1.00

I recently purchased additional RAM through Crucial and the Crucial Report
says that I have: Computer Model K7S5A (Rev 3.X)

The ECS website has different specs/settings/drivers/etc for Rev 3.1 and
Rev
3.1B.

Searching around the net, I only found one site that has the best
comparison
to the mobo that I have. It's says that it's a "ECS K7S5A SiS 735
Motherboard." The specs that it gives are:

Motherboard Specifications
CPU Socket: Socket A (200/266 MHz Support)
Chipset: SiS 735
Form Factor: ATX
Multiplier Options: 5.5 - 12.5x (Default CPU only)
Bus Speed Options: 100, 112, 133, 138, 150 MHz
Voltages: 1.35v - 1.85v (default CPU only)
Memory Support: 2 x 184-pin DDR DRAM PC1600/PC2100 Support,
2 x 168-pin SDRAM PC100/PC133 Support
Expansion Slots: 5/0/1/1 (PCI/ISA/AGP/AMR)
AGP Support: 4x AGP
USB Support: 2x Standard USB ports, 2x Add-on USB ports
Integrated Components: AC'97 Audio
10/100 Network Interface
Bios: AMI BIOS
Onboard IDE: 2 x ATA100 EIDE


None of the sites can tell me the mobo model. I have to select a model
and
the site will give me the info about it. Without knowing which mobo that
I
have, I would have to guess and hope that my guess was right, which I
wouldn't do. Is there any way that I can definitely determine the mobo
model?

Denise


Denise:
You really don't have any problem here...

1. Your 300 GB Seagate HD is an industry-standard device and manufactured to
physical dimensions that, for all practical purposes, are identical to any 3
1/2" HD such as any other HD you presently have in your system.

2. Your motherboard's BIOS supports large-capacity HDs, i.e., those whose
disk capacity is > 137 GB (approx. 128 GB binary).

So as long as SP1 and/or SP2 is installed, your XP OS will recognize the
full-capacity of that 300 GB HD (approx 280 GB).

So there's really no need for any BIOS upgrade re this issue.
Anna
 
G

Guest

Thanks Anna. As long as I know that the model I bought is compatible with my
pc and I don't have to download new drivers and BIOS, I'm all set. :))

Denise
 
B

Bob Knowlden

I'm all for reassurance, but...

Something I saw on Google searching the K7S5A suggests that older versions
of it BIOS may not be LBA48 compliant. ECS lists Rev. 3.1 and 3.1b as
supporting hard drives up to 250 MB, but no BIOS versions are listed. If
Denise is lucky, that means that all BIOS versions are OK. (Ignore the 250
GB business otherwise. I know of no restrictions that would permit 250 GB
but no larger.)

Did you see something in this thread or elsewhere that I failed to see?

Incidentally, I spotted information on finding the board revision number.
It's supposed to be screened on the board near the PCI slot nearest the
graphics slot or near one of the memory slots:

http://www.ecs.com.tw/ECSWeb/Support/KnowHow.aspx#ver_mb

Some of the free software out there (like SiSoft SANDRA) may be capable of
displaying board revisions (if ECS was kind enough to include it in the
BIOS).

For Denise: I should have added: why not just connect the drive and try it?
If the board BIOS detects the full capacity (probably 279 GB), you're good
to go, as you have XP SP2, which supports the large drives.
 
G

Guest

Hi Bob,

I'm really good with software but this is my first venture into installing
hardware, except for additional RAM and a firewire card. Those were simple
and I wasn't concerned that I'd ruin my mobo, processor, c drive, etc. I
didn't know what to expect . . . with Murphy's Law, I could've fried my
whole pc, so I wanted to check it out with people who know about hardware.

I've gotten some pretty good advice and I almost installed the drive today,
except that when I opened my pc, the screws holding the cage in place look
like an allen wrench would remove them except that they have a bubble in the
middle and I don't have a tool that would remove them. I'm planning on
calling around to see who sells that kind of tool. An installation disc came
with the hd and it had a short video on how to install the hard drive. They
made a point of wearing an anti-static wrist band and I don't have one of
those either.

Anyway, to make a long story short, I think I've done enough research and
received a lot of good information and I feel comfortable with installing the
drive now. I'd like to thank you all for your help . . . I couldn't have
done it without you. I'll let you know how it all turns out.

Denise
 
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A

Anna

HartsVideo said:
Hi Bob,

I'm really good with software but this is my first venture into installing
hardware, except for additional RAM and a firewire card. Those were
simple
and I wasn't concerned that I'd ruin my mobo, processor, c drive, etc. I
didn't know what to expect . . . with Murphy's Law, I could've fried my
whole pc, so I wanted to check it out with people who know about hardware.

I've gotten some pretty good advice and I almost installed the drive
today,
except that when I opened my pc, the screws holding the cage in place look
like an allen wrench would remove them except that they have a bubble in
the
middle and I don't have a tool that would remove them. I'm planning on
calling around to see who sells that kind of tool. An installation disc
came
with the hd and it had a short video on how to install the hard drive.
They
made a point of wearing an anti-static wrist band and I don't have one of
those either.

Anyway, to make a long story short, I think I've done enough research and
received a lot of good information and I feel comfortable with installing
the
drive now. I'd like to thank you all for your help . . . I couldn't have
done it without you. I'll let you know how it all turns out.

Denise


Denise:
I wouldn't be overly concerned about wearing an anti-static wrist band when
you install your HD. If you have one, fine, but unless you live in an
extraordinarily dry environment where static electricity is a problem I
really don't think there's a need to go out and purchase one just to install
your HD. I've probably installed 1,000 or more HDs over the years and have
never suffered any ill consequences by not using one. But if it will make
you feel more comfortable to use that device, then do so.

It's hard to give you any advice re physically installing the drive in your
particular computer case. Most of the time it's a simple matter of sliding
the drive into an available 3 1/2" bay and fastening the device with the
provided screws which usually are designed to take a small Phillips-head
screwdriver. Sometimes there's a "cage" (perhaps such as the one you've
encountered) that contains a number of bays and the cage has to be pivoted
to gain access to the bays. Usually it's a "tooless" design, but not always.
Unfortunately there's no "standard" way. Many cases come with their own
proprietary fastening device and in some cases no screws are even necessary
as the bay contains one gizmo or another to secure the drive without screws
or special tool.
Anna
 
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