Installing Vista OEM version on a different computer


P

pk

I recently purchased a new computer from HP that came with Vista Home Premium
pre-installed but decided I wanted to install and use Vista Ultimate-64
instead. I bought a full-version (not the upgrade version) of Vista Ultimate
and have installed it on the new HP computer.

Can I now, legally, install Vista Home Premium on a different computer
(Dell) using the product key and license that originally came with my new
computer?

Also, provided it is legal to do so, would I just use the Ultimate DVD for
the install but use the Home Premium Product key to install Vista on my Dell
computer?

Thanks
 
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S

Saucy

pk said:
I recently purchased a new computer from HP that came with Vista Home
Premium
pre-installed but decided I wanted to install and use Vista Ultimate-64
instead. I bought a full-version (not the upgrade version) of Vista
Ultimate
and have installed it on the new HP computer.

Can I now, legally, install Vista Home Premium on a different computer
(Dell) using the product key and license that originally came with my new
computer?

Also, provided it is legal to do so, would I just use the Ultimate DVD for
the install but use the Home Premium Product key to install Vista on my
Dell
computer?

Thanks


Legally? You will have consult a lawyer etc. etc.

Microsoftally? Microsoft would probably say the OEM license is for only the
computer Windows was first installed & activated on .. and usually not
thereafter transferable to another computer.

Morally? Don't steal nor be the cause any grievous copywrite offence.

Saucy
 
A

Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]

OEM Versions of Windows Vista are non transferrable, they are tied to the
motherboard.
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

I recently purchased a new computer from HP that came with Vista Home Premium
pre-installed but decided I wanted to install and use Vista Ultimate-64
instead. I bought a full-version (not the upgrade version) of Vista Ultimate
and have installed it on the new HP computer.

Can I now, legally, install Vista Home Premium on a different computer
(Dell) using the product key and license that originally came with my new
computer?


Unfortunately, no. If the HP came with Vista preinstalled, it's an OEM
version of Vista. The biggest disadvantage of an OEM version is that
its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's installed
on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold, or given
away without the computer it came with.

This is the main reason I almost always recommend against OEM
versions.
 
D

Donald L McDaniel

OEM Versions of Windows Vista are non transferrable, they are tied to the
motherboard.

That really depends on the TYPE of OEM distro one has. Some are
BIOS-locked, while some (Like Dell's) is a "FULL OEM" which will only
install "pre-activated" on a Dell motherboard, but will ALSO install
(not pre-activated) on any Intel-based PC. I've heard that HP's OEMs
are more cheaply-made, so they probably will only install on a machine
with an HP motherboard.

Now, if you are referring to the LICENSE, that of course, is
non-transferrable to a second machine, according to Microsoft's OEM
license.

This is also the case for so-called "FULL OEM" distros. Their
licenses may only be applied to a single machine, unless sold to a new
owner (according to the terms of the EULA, of course), in which case,
the new owner may only use the license on the machine with which it
was sold.


Donald L.McDaniel
Please reply to original thread and newsgroup.
================================================
 
V

VistaByte

No, not to the motherboard unless the company that sold the computer to him
says its tied to the motherboard..

it is tied to the "computer" and the computer is a fuzzy term since you can
change some components at a time, and over time you might end up with
totally different hardware thus having a new computer...

Microsft itself does not mention "motherboard" this is an urban myth that is
going around..

something like the "vista is faster than xp" myth
 
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V

VistaByte

Hypothetically this scenario might have happened
.... due to bad weather and stormes various components like the motherboard
got fried on the original computer, thus you had to replace them...
activation by phone would then restore the computers function
 
X

xfile

Hi,

My two cents and see if it works out for you,

Using Amazon's price for reference,

(1) Ultimate full version: USD 323
(2) Home Premium 32-bit OEM: USD 109
(3) Ultimate 64-bit OEM: USD 193 (rounded)

So if you return the full version and buy the OEM version for each, you will
save USD 21 and can have both.

Please noted that OEM version cannot be transferred to another system, and
you may want to compare with the upgrade versions, but the above could give
you an idea about how to get what you wanted.

Hope this helps and good luck.
 
U

uvbogden

Legally I can't say. I know MSFT allows one software license to be activated
on the licensee's computer and a laptop. Philosophically speaking, MSFT
would want you to do in this situation whatever gets them more of your money
(say, buy two licenses for each computer). Ethically and morally I believe
you should be within your rights to switch the OS to another computer if you
want to. You are not cheating anyone out of a license fee; you paid for both
OS's, you should use them how you wish as long as you're not trying to use
one license for multiple computers. For what it's worth, that's my opinion.
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

That really depends on the TYPE of OEM distro one has. Some are
BIOS-locked, while some (Like Dell's) is a "FULL OEM" which will only
install "pre-activated" on a Dell motherboard, but will ALSO install
(not pre-activated) on any Intel-based PC. I've heard that HP's OEMs
are more cheaply-made, so they probably will only install on a machine
with an HP motherboard.

Now, if you are referring to the LICENSE, that of course, is
non-transferrable to a second machine, according to Microsoft's OEM
license.


Right, but lest there be any confusion here, note that it's
non-transferable to a second computer, not a second motherboard.
Although there are those who think that changing the motherboard makes
it a different computer, that is *not* Microsoft's position. See
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/activationfaq.mspx
or http://tinyurl.com/384gx5

which states "If you acquired Windows Vista pre-installed on a
computer from a major manufacturer (sometimes referred to as an
Original Equipment Manufacturer or OEM), Windows Vista will require
re-activation if you replace the motherboard with a motherboard not
provided by the OEM."
 
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P

Phisherman

I recently purchased a new computer from HP that came with Vista Home Premium
pre-installed but decided I wanted to install and use Vista Ultimate-64
instead. I bought a full-version (not the upgrade version) of Vista Ultimate
and have installed it on the new HP computer.

Can I now, legally, install Vista Home Premium on a different computer
(Dell) using the product key and license that originally came with my new
computer?

Also, provided it is legal to do so, would I just use the Ultimate DVD for
the install but use the Home Premium Product key to install Vista on my Dell
computer?

Thanks

Swap the motherboards. The OEM version "belongs" to the motherboard.
 
P

Phisherman

Unfortunately, no. If the HP came with Vista preinstalled, it's an OEM
version of Vista. The biggest disadvantage of an OEM version is that
its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's installed
on. It can never legally be moved to another computer, sold, or given
away without the computer it came with.

This is the main reason I almost always recommend against OEM
versions.


If the motherboard goes bad and gets replaced (but uses the same CPU),
will the user need to buy another license? What defines "computer?"
Certainly, you can change the case, mouse, keyboard, video card, RAM
and hard drive and still have the same computer as before?
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

If the motherboard goes bad and gets replaced (but uses the same CPU),
will the user need to buy another license? What defines "computer?"


This has long been in question, and Microsoft never defined what
constitutes the same computer. But there is now an answer to that
question. Replacing the motherboard does not invalidate the license.
See
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/activationfaq.mspx
or http://tinyurl.com/384gx5

which states "If you acquired Windows Vista pre-installed on a
computer from a major manufacturer (sometimes referred to as an
Original Equipment Manufacturer or OEM), Windows Vista will require
re-activation if you replace the motherboard with a motherboard not
provided by the OEM."
 
B

Bruce Chambers

pk said:
I recently purchased a new computer from HP that came with Vista Home Premium
pre-installed but decided I wanted to install and use Vista Ultimate-64
instead. I bought a full-version (not the upgrade version) of Vista Ultimate
and have installed it on the new HP computer.

Can I now, legally, install Vista Home Premium on a different computer
(Dell) using the product key and license that originally came with my new
computer?


No. OEM licenses are permanently bound to the first computer on which
they're installed, and not transferable to any other computer, under any
circumstances. (And it won't work, because the OEM installation DVD
will have been BIOS-locked to the HP motherboard to prevent such an
attempt at software piracy.)



--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:


They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
killed a great many philosophers.
~ Denis Diderot
 
H

HeyBub

VistaByte said:
Microsft itself does not mention "motherboard" this is an urban myth
that is going around..

So.... if either my wife or I have a heart transplant, we're still married?
 
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V

VistaByte

you are still married.. however the heart you may get may have other
intentions...

it has been observer that in a percentage of patients that get a heart
transplant,
the receiver of the transplant gets some characteristics of the personality
of the doner.

as if information is transferred... thus if the heart you get belongs to a
woman, you will start liking men. LOL

you can Google this to learn more....
 
V

VistaByte

this whole story is stupid....

its ment to mix up people and not let them transfer the OEM to new
hardware...


however my scenario that I have proposed a long time ago still stands..

what if you change half the computer parts at one time, then another time
you change the other half.?..

in effect you would have a "new" computer and you still would have the OEM
liscence.. lol
 
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