I'm at the proverbial brick wall with this 'puter!


T

The Seabat

OK, I've got a four or five year old Gateway, 400MHz, 64MB RAM,
Windows 98SE. I can't seem to figure out what is keeping this puppy
from connecting to the internet.

I've changed DSL modems three times.
Swapped around cat5 cables a whole lot of times.
Tried three different NIC cards, one twice after it was sent back from
the factory (D-Link) with a report that it was fine.
Windows recognizes the D-Link card (DFE-538TX) and the drivers install
just fine. There are no problems in Device Manager or in Networks in
the Control Panel.
There are no settings for the NIC card in the BIOS, I checked for
sure. No conflicts with IRQ's. The NIC card is the only PCI card.
Video and sound are both onboard the motherboard.
When the cat5 is installed into the slot in the card, the green light
comes on and so does the light on the modem. But it will not connect
to the internet, or even let me connect to the modem. Everything works
fine except you can't connect to the net.

All the parts have been installed in an other system and they all work
just peachy that way. I have wiped the hard drive clean, reformatted
and re-installed Windows 98SE twice. I have un-installed and
re-installed Windows network three times. I've been into save mode and
made sure that all devices had been deleted before installing them
again and that is all clean, except for what is supposed to be there.
I have moved the NIC card around all the PCI slots on the motherboard
to no avail.
Everything works! But it won't access the web. Arrrrrgghhhhh!! I'm at
a loss. Nothing seems to be broken or not working, so how the H***
does one fix it?? Could this be a sneaky plot by Gateway to keep
everything but their proprietary junk off this 'puter?? I know, I
know, but I'm grasping at straws right now!

The seabat.....sitting in the corner giving before mentioned computer
the evil eye!
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

Kent_Diego

.....
Windows recognizes the D-Link card (DFE-538TX) and the drivers install
just fine. There are no problems in Device Manager or in Networks in
the Control Panel.
....
When the cat5 is installed into the slot in the card, the green light
comes on and so does the light on the modem. But it will not connect
to the internet, or even let me connect to the modem. Everything works
fine except you can't connect to the net.
From above everything should be good. As I recall the Win98 IP configuration
command is WINIPCFG but its been a long time. So Start>Run>winipcfg and see
what the IP address of NIC is. Try a Refresh All and see if the DSL modem
givs a real IP address to NIC. Try power off and on DSL modem and waiting a
few minutes. Then try Refresh All and see if now you have ISP assigned IP
address. If not working look in the NIC's TCP/IP configuration to be sure
DHCP is enabled. Call your ISP's tech support. That is all I can think of.
Back in the day when I used Win98 I seem to remember that it all "just
worked" if the Device Manager said OK and lights blinked. If your hard drive
is over 4 GB I would suggest you buy a 256MB SD-RAM stick and install
Windows XP. Post back your progress.
 
J

JAD

The Seabat said:
OK, I've got a four or five year old Gateway, 400MHz, 64MB RAM,
Windows 98SE. I can't seem to figure out what is keeping this puppy
from connecting to the internet.

I've changed DSL modems three times.
Swapped around cat5 cables a whole lot of times.
Tried three different NIC cards, one twice after it was sent back from
the factory (D-Link) with a report that it was fine.
Windows recognizes the D-Link card (DFE-538TX) and the drivers install
just fine. There are no problems in Device Manager or in Networks in
the Control Panel.
There are no settings for the NIC card in the BIOS, I checked for
sure. No conflicts with IRQ's. The NIC card is the only PCI card.
Video and sound are both onboard the motherboard.
When the cat5 is installed into the slot in the card, the green light
comes on and so does the light on the modem. But it will not connect
to the internet, or even let me connect to the modem. Everything works
fine except you can't connect to the net.

All the parts have been installed in an other system and they all work
just peachy that way. I have wiped the hard drive clean, reformatted
and re-installed Windows 98SE twice. I have un-installed and
re-installed Windows network three times. I've been into save mode and
made sure that all devices had been deleted before installing them
again and that is all clean, except for what is supposed to be there.
I have moved the NIC card around all the PCI slots on the motherboard
to no avail.
Everything works! But it won't access the web. Arrrrrgghhhhh!! I'm at
a loss. Nothing seems to be broken or not working, so how the H***
does one fix it?? Could this be a sneaky plot by Gateway to keep
everything but their proprietary junk off this 'puter?? I know, I
know, but I'm grasping at straws right now!

The seabat.....sitting in the corner giving before mentioned computer
the evil eye!

Is this the 'only' machine on the lan at the time of connection (or
failing )to the web?
DHCP is enabled in tcp/ip settings?
Winipcfg at run line says what about your gateway and DNS servers.
You have tried to share files between rigs?
You have tried to open browser and connect to the modem's html setting page?
does the modem have this way of communication?
 
B

BigJim

do you have any other computers that connect using the dsl connection?
 
D

David Maynard

The said:
OK, I've got a four or five year old Gateway, 400MHz, 64MB RAM,
Windows 98SE. I can't seem to figure out what is keeping this puppy
from connecting to the internet.

I've changed DSL modems three times.
Swapped around cat5 cables a whole lot of times.
Tried three different NIC cards, one twice after it was sent back from
the factory (D-Link) with a report that it was fine.
Windows recognizes the D-Link card (DFE-538TX) and the drivers install
just fine. There are no problems in Device Manager or in Networks in
the Control Panel.
There are no settings for the NIC card in the BIOS, I checked for
sure. No conflicts with IRQ's. The NIC card is the only PCI card.
Video and sound are both onboard the motherboard.
When the cat5 is installed into the slot in the card, the green light
comes on and so does the light on the modem. But it will not connect
to the internet, or even let me connect to the modem. Everything works
fine except you can't connect to the net.

All the parts have been installed in an other system and they all work
just peachy that way. I have wiped the hard drive clean, reformatted
and re-installed Windows 98SE twice. I have un-installed and
re-installed Windows network three times. I've been into save mode and
made sure that all devices had been deleted before installing them
again and that is all clean, except for what is supposed to be there.
I have moved the NIC card around all the PCI slots on the motherboard
to no avail.
Everything works! But it won't access the web. Arrrrrgghhhhh!! I'm at
a loss. Nothing seems to be broken or not working, so how the H***
does one fix it?? Could this be a sneaky plot by Gateway to keep
everything but their proprietary junk off this 'puter?? I know, I
know, but I'm grasping at straws right now!

The seabat.....sitting in the corner giving before mentioned computer
the evil eye!
You went through all the hardware descriptions but not a word about the
network configuration and I'd bet that's where the problem lies.

The most basic question is, when you speak of "Microsoft Network" did you
install TCP/IP?

After that, what are your TCP/IP settings?

Btw, while you're at it, remove NetBEUI and IPX, if it's there.
 
D

Dave

David Maynard said:
You went through all the hardware descriptions but not a word about the
network configuration and I'd bet that's where the problem lies.

The most basic question is, when you speak of "Microsoft Network" did you
install TCP/IP?

After that, what are your TCP/IP settings?

Btw, while you're at it, remove NetBEUI and IPX, if it's there.
Bingo!!! Make sure TCP/IP is installed and configured properly, and linked
to the NIC. Otherwise, the NIC won't use it. Also, after verifying all the
TCP/IP settings, make sure that Internet Explorer is the first app. that
tries to use the Internet, even if you ordinarily don't use Internet
Explorer. -Dave
 
T

The Seabat

Yes, but it has been connected to a known good DSL setup.
All it says is PPP adapter
Adapter address = 44-45-53-54-00-00
DHCP address = 255.255.255.255
No, this is only machine on line
 
T

The Seabat

IP Addres = Obtain auto
WINS config = Use DHCP
Gateway = blank
Bindings = Cliehnt for Microsoft Network checked
Advanced = Allow binding to ATM - checked yes
Netbios = greyed out
DNS config = DisabledThey have already been removed
 
R

Randella

A subnet mask of 255.255.255.255 is bad.

You are on the broadcast channel for all IP adresses and it is not
routable. Try changing your IP address and subnet mask to something
usable.

-Randy
 
D

Dave

">>>After that, what are your TCP/IP settings?
IP Addres = Obtain auto OK
WINS config = Use DHCP (WINS should be disabled)
Gateway = blank OK
Bindings = Cliehnt for Microsoft Network checked
The only binding should be TCP/IP --------->(your network adapter/NIC) If
you have a list of bindings under the heading of your NIC, TCP/IP should be
"checked". Uncheck client for microsoft networks.
Advanced = Allow binding to ATM - checked yes
Shouldn't affect anything, but isn't doing anything, either. Uncheck it.
Netbios = greyed out OK
DNS config = Disabled
DNS should be "automatic" or "optain from ISP", unless your ISP requires
this to be pre-configured. DNS disabled is a huge problem, unless that's
what they call "automatic".
 
B

BigJim

what I would like to know is, have you had any other computer using your dsl
line with success. If not, try one to get a connection. If you cannot get a
connection
then I would say your dsl connection is at fault. That is a horse of a
different color/dsl connections either work or they don't and if they don't
work you can try the phone company but chances are you may be to far away
from the central office for a connect.
 
T

The Seabat

The DSL line is fine...in fact I'm using it now with a different
computer, also running Windows 98. That was my first thought (hope)
that it was SBC's fault, but, alas, they're QRKing fivers.
 
B

BigJim

the only thing I can suggest is reboot your modem
and try this newsgroup comp.dcom.modems.cable
 
J

johns

It probably is working, but your version of IE is so out
of date that it has expired, and no longer funtions on
the web. Microsoft use to send out notices about that.
Test ping. If that is working, then your problem is W98.

johns
 
D

David Maynard

The said:
Yes, it has been installed several times.
Check that you've got an entry in network that shows

TCP/IP --> <network card>

I presume you do and that's the entry holding the settings you list below.
However, if you're telling me setting from the Dial Up Adapter entry then
you need to install TCP/IP for the network card.
IP Addres = Obtain auto
Correct if your DSL modem provides it, and most do.

You don't have a static IP DSL line, do you? If you don't know then you
don't because it costs money.
WINS config = Use DHCP
Should not be a 'problem' but since you are using only one computer at a
time there is no need for WINS. That's for Windows Networking to find other
Windows computers on a local Windows LAN and you don't have any others.

And since the modem isn't going to give you any WINS servers it doesn't
really matter.
Gateway = blank
Correct, if your DSL modem automatically provides an IP, and they normally
do, as the gateway address comes with it.

The gateway is the address of a device that the computer sends requests to
when the target machine is not 'local'. I.E. what is the 'gateway' to the
rest of the world?

In your case, since there is no LAN, they all go through the gateway of
your DSL modem.
Bindings = Cliehnt for Microsoft Network checked
Uncheck that, you're not logging onto any Microsoft Network and that might
be your problem if the modem is seeing that and deciding to reject the
computer as 'screwed up', or something.

Or remove "Client for Microsoft Network" entirely because you aren't doing
a local network (removing that will take out printer and file sharing along
with it.
Advanced = Allow binding to ATM - checked yes
Uncheck it. You don't have a 25mbps switched ATM network, although I've not
seen 'yes' cause a problem (meaning that isn't 'the solution').
Netbios = greyed out
Ah, ok. You've already removed NetBEUI. It's greyed out because, without
NetBEUI, netbios will be forced to go over TCP/IP so no 'choice'. Not that
it matters since with only one computer it won't be doing any Netbios
activity (you certainly HOPE as that's for printer and file sharing and you
for dern sure don't want printer and file shares open to the internet)
DNS config = Disabled
I noticed that raised a few eyebrows in another post but that's normal and
is the 'auto' setting although I have no idea why the heck they didn't just
call it auto. It's a kind of 'negative' logic; if you specify it, by
'enable', then it's 'set' and won't be gotten from the modem. However, it
should be getting the DNS numbers from the modem (hence 'disable DNS'
[manual settings]), assuming the modem provides them like most modems do.
They have already been removed
Ok.

I mentioned 'static IP' above and keep saying "if the modem provides it."
If your DSL connection is static then you usually need to manually set in
the assigned IP/mask, gateway, and DNS information as it's not dynamically,
meaning DHCP, assigned. That costs money, though, and most DSL connections
are dynamic (although they don't change very often and, so, give the
impression they're static).

Now, I see in another post you say WINIPCFG shows "only" PPP. Did you try
the drop down box to select another entry? Because, if you did and PPP
truly is the 'only' one listed in there then Windows Networking doesn't
believe the card even exists as a network device because it'll show up in
the list whether the DSL modem gave it an IP or not. Which, of course, is
how one checks to see if it did. So, if it ain't there then the card isn't
installed properly in either device manager, or networking, or both.

Lastly, I've heard that some modems 'lock' themselves to the computer's MAC
address (of the NIC) with the idea being to not allow more than one
computer use what is supposed to be a single DSL connection. I don't know
if anyone still does that and I've never used one that did.
 
D

David Maynard

johns said:
It probably is working, but your version of IE is so out
of date that it has expired, and no longer funtions on
the web. Microsoft use to send out notices about that.
Test ping. If that is working, then your problem is W98.

johns
Internet Explorer doesn't 'expire'. What you may have heard of is old SSL
certificates 'expiring' after a certain date. Actually, it isn't that they
fall apart or go 'poof', it's that they aren't valid past that date.

It only affects sites wanting to establish a secure connection to the
machine, like online banking. It might revert to an insecure connection or
some sites might not allow an insecure transaction regardless.

But it wouldn't prevent IE from working on most sites and you'd still know
it was working even on the ones that reject it as you get told why.
 
J

johns

I had to upgrade IE constantly to get out at all .. on
about 1200 machines. All we ever got was "page
not found" until we did. I'm guessing he's installing
nearly the original version of IE, and Microsoft will
not let that version run on the net at all. It is not
compatible with modernday protocols. He can
test it with ping to his dns server. If that server
answers, then his system is OK, he just needs
to find a way to upgrade IE. I use to be able to
ftp the upgrades .. probably dead now.

johns
 
J

John Doe

johns said:
I had to upgrade IE constantly to get out at all .. on about 1200
machines. All we ever got was "page not found" until we did. I'm
guessing he's installing nearly the original version of IE, and
Microsoft will not let that version run on the net at all. It is
not compatible with modernday protocols. He can test it with ping
to his dns server. If that server answers, then his system is OK,
he just needs to find a way to upgrade IE. I use to be able to
ftp the upgrades .. probably dead now.
That sounds strange. Yes, Microsoft apparently has been improving
its methods for connecting the first time. But upgrades to Internet
Explorer didn't matter for my already established dial-up
connections of the past. Maybe that's different for LAN style
connections.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

The Seabat

I was using Firefox to try and access the net. But why would that have
anything to do with, say, a newsreader (Agent) accessing the net? Does
it also need a newer IE to be able to access?? I have IE 5.5 and IE 6
burned to a CD that I could use to upgrade 'em, but I thought by using
Firefox v1.5 that I would not even have to mess with IE!
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top