How to split large audio files on Linux


Abarbarian

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https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-split-large-audio-files-on-linux/

It is often the case that we want to split an “one-piece” audio recording into smaller files. A live concert could be broken down into songs so that you can burn it on a CD, or an interview can be separated into thematic sections. Whatever the case, here are four different ways to do it:

I have used Mp3splt which works well and is very useful for batch renaming. I use it to tidy up my Radio 4Xtra downloads and rearrange them to use on my mp3 player in the car. :cool:
 
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nivrip

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Audacity works very well. I've used it for allsorts of things and it is very straightforward. :thumb:
 

floppybootstomp

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I've used Audacity in both Linux and Windows for some time now.

Some of the public address amplifiers I deal with use mp2 files for their sound signals and Audacity does not work well with them for some reason.

I spoke to an engineer at TOA UK about this problem and he introduced me to Wavosaur which is similar to Audacity but in my experience is a lot more stable and reliable than Audacity.

Unfortunately Wavosaur only works with Windows or with WINE in Linux.
 
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Abarbarian

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Shame that Wavosaur is a MS product only as you can run it as a stand alone from a usb stick.

http://www.wavosaur.com/

Came across this you might like Flop's as it runs well on Mint apparently,

http://www.ocenaudio.com.br/download

Cross-platform support
ocenaudio is available for all major operating systems: Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Native applications are generated for each platform from a common source, in order to achieve excelent performance and seamless integration with the operating system. All versions of ocenaudio have a uniform set of features and the same graphical interface, so the skills you learn in one platform can be used in the others.

To assist ocenaudio development, a powerful toolset of audio editing, analysis and manipulation called Ocen Framework was created. ocenaudio is also based on Qt framework, a well known library for cross-platform development.

:cool:
 

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