How to make a cloned disk boot?


B

Bo Berglund

I am having great troubles in transferring the XP-Pro system disk to a
new bigger drive for the HP laptop of one of my associates. I am using
Ghost 2003 to clone the system drive to a 160 Gb Seagate drive that is
connected via USB2 during the cloning process.

In order to limit the problems I initialized the disk in Windows (via
the Disk Management console) and created a partition of 60 Gb. The old
system disk is 40 Gb. I have heard bad things about having a boot
partition larger than 137 Gb and in order to just create enough space
for defragging I put it at 60 Gb. Data can be later stored on the
remaining disk space.

Then I ran Ghost 2003 to clone the disk to the partition I had
created. All seemed to work just fine, Ghost finished and returned to
Windows as it was supposed to do. The disk showed up in Disk
Management as a healthy NTFS volume of 60 Gb. Since it was not marked
as Active I did that to it from the console.
Then the laptop was powered down and the disk was mounted in the
internal drive bay and the power was switched on.

Now it hangs on a black screen with the cursor in the upper left
corner without booting. I am pretty sure *everything* on the original
drive was copied over, yet it does not boot...

What am I missing here? There must be something simple to do to te
disk to make it come around, but what?

The laptop

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

JS

I haven't use Ghost 2003 for some time now (currently using 2006 version)
but if I remember correctly there where switch options that change the way
Ghost functions, check the manual and see if anything can be found.

JS
 
A

Anna

Bo Berglund said:
I am having great troubles in transferring the XP-Pro system disk to a
new bigger drive for the HP laptop of one of my associates. I am using
Ghost 2003 to clone the system drive to a 160 Gb Seagate drive that is
connected via USB2 during the cloning process.

In order to limit the problems I initialized the disk in Windows (via
the Disk Management console) and created a partition of 60 Gb. The old
system disk is 40 Gb. I have heard bad things about having a boot
partition larger than 137 Gb and in order to just create enough space
for defragging I put it at 60 Gb. Data can be later stored on the
remaining disk space.

Then I ran Ghost 2003 to clone the disk to the partition I had
created. All seemed to work just fine, Ghost finished and returned to
Windows as it was supposed to do. The disk showed up in Disk
Management as a healthy NTFS volume of 60 Gb. Since it was not marked
as Active I did that to it from the console.
Then the laptop was powered down and the disk was mounted in the
internal drive bay and the power was switched on.

Now it hangs on a black screen with the cursor in the upper left
corner without booting. I am pretty sure *everything* on the original
drive was copied over, yet it does not boot...

What am I missing here? There must be something simple to do to te
disk to make it come around, but what?

The laptop

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com


Bo:
Is this the same problem you posted about in the XP general newsgroup a few
days ago? The subject was "Weird actions after cloning XP-Pro disk...". If
so, did you happen to see my response dtd 12/17/06?
Anna
 
B

Bo Berglund

Bo:
Is this the same problem you posted about in the XP general newsgroup a few
days ago? The subject was "Weird actions after cloning XP-Pro disk...". If
so, did you happen to see my response dtd 12/17/06?
Anna
Hi Anna,
no I did not see your response before, but now I have read the whole
thread that followed. I am a bit mystified as to what he experienced,
it is strange that a PC not involved in cloning died...

Well, my problems started out like I described when I tried to Ghost
my own drive (80 Gb) first using Ghost 2003 from an old bootable CD I
had. It failed on the USB transfer (extremely slow). Then I bought
Ghost 10 to try again and I installed it on the laptop and made
perhaps 6-7 cloning attempts before I finally succeeded.
One of them was after I had formatted the new drive to an NTFS
partition in Disk Management and then targeted that for the clone. The
weird thing then was that it did boot up sort of, but would not let me
log on. Hence the "weird actions" posting.
I really wanted to expand the drive size, but whenever I tried that I
failed. Only when I used Ghost10 to clone the drive and:
- not expand the size
- not copy the MBR
- not set a drive letter
- set the drive active for booting
did I succeed getting a bootable working drive, but it is still the
same old size. :-(
I'll have to live with that....

Now I am moving to the other HP laptops in my group (there are 3 more
but a different model). I found that in the Ghost 10 package was also
a Ghost 2003 CD and so I am trying this (now with USB2 drivers added
to the cloning session). The clone is set up from the Windows GUI and
then it wants to restart the PC to do the ghosting. The transfer rate
is about 400 Mb/min, some 20 times faster than in my original attempt
with my old boot CD.

However Ghost 2003 does not have the same settings, specifically I
could not find a checkbox to set the drive bootable (active). That is
why I did it manually in Disk Management.

Now I am stuck, because I can't use Ghost 10 since I had to activate
it with Symantec on my own laptop before it would enable the cloning
function (bummer). So now I cannot use it on the remaining laptops to
clone those drives.....

But in my estimation the drive is cloned OK concerning the data, it is
only some minor "trick" remaining to tell Windows that it can boot
from it, I believe. But how????

An alternative would be to create a boot CD (we cannot do a boot
floppy because we don't have a floppy drive anywhere). Once we have
that (with the USB2 driver!) I guess we could boot a PC with that and
ghost from a USB attached drive to another USB attached drive.
Or put the blank drive into the laptop bay and its own system drive on
a USB2 line. What do you think?

I went here because I thought that this is more of hardware related
issue, maybe wrong?

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
J

JS

Doesn't Ghost 10 give you the option to ignore the partition size on the new
drive and use the existing size even if it is larger?
This assumes that the new drive has already been partitioned and formatted.

JS
 
A

Anna

Bo Berglund said:
Hi Anna,
no I did not see your response before, but now I have read the whole
thread that followed. I am a bit mystified as to what he experienced,
it is strange that a PC not involved in cloning died...

Well, my problems started out like I described when I tried to Ghost
my own drive (80 Gb) first using Ghost 2003 from an old bootable CD I
had. It failed on the USB transfer (extremely slow). Then I bought
Ghost 10 to try again and I installed it on the laptop and made
perhaps 6-7 cloning attempts before I finally succeeded.
One of them was after I had formatted the new drive to an NTFS
partition in Disk Management and then targeted that for the clone. The
weird thing then was that it did boot up sort of, but would not let me
log on. Hence the "weird actions" posting.
I really wanted to expand the drive size, but whenever I tried that I
failed. Only when I used Ghost10 to clone the drive and:
- not expand the size
- not copy the MBR
- not set a drive letter
- set the drive active for booting
did I succeed getting a bootable working drive, but it is still the
same old size. :-(
I'll have to live with that....

Now I am moving to the other HP laptops in my group (there are 3 more
but a different model). I found that in the Ghost 10 package was also
a Ghost 2003 CD and so I am trying this (now with USB2 drivers added
to the cloning session). The clone is set up from the Windows GUI and
then it wants to restart the PC to do the ghosting. The transfer rate
is about 400 Mb/min, some 20 times faster than in my original attempt
with my old boot CD.

However Ghost 2003 does not have the same settings, specifically I
could not find a checkbox to set the drive bootable (active). That is
why I did it manually in Disk Management.

Now I am stuck, because I can't use Ghost 10 since I had to activate
it with Symantec on my own laptop before it would enable the cloning
function (bummer). So now I cannot use it on the remaining laptops to
clone those drives.....

But in my estimation the drive is cloned OK concerning the data, it is
only some minor "trick" remaining to tell Windows that it can boot
from it, I believe. But how????

An alternative would be to create a boot CD (we cannot do a boot
floppy because we don't have a floppy drive anywhere). Once we have
that (with the USB2 driver!) I guess we could boot a PC with that and
ghost from a USB attached drive to another USB attached drive.
Or put the blank drive into the laptop bay and its own system drive on
a USB2 line. What do you think?

I went here because I thought that this is more of hardware related
issue, maybe wrong?

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com


Bo:
Based on our experiences and our personal preferences, we've never been
thrilled with either the Norton Ghost 9 or 10 versions. When we used the
Ghost 2003 program (and we've probably used it more than a thousand times
over the years) we use it for one and only one purpose - to clone the
contents of one HDD to another HDD. In so doing, we always (or nearly
always) use a Ghost 2003 bootable floppy disk that's created through the
program or Ghost bootable CD to carry out that function. We have long since
given up on Ghost's GUI.

What I had planned to do is to step you through the disk-to-disk cloning
process using either a Ghost bootable floppy disk or bootable CD. As
apparently you know, you need the Ghost bootable floppy disk in order to
create a Ghost bootable CD.

Anyway, if there's any way you can get your hands on a system having a
floppy disk drive and want to pursue this further please let us know.
Anna
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Bo Berglund

Bo:
Based on our experiences and our personal preferences, we've never been
thrilled with either the Norton Ghost 9 or 10 versions. When we used the
Ghost 2003 program (and we've probably used it more than a thousand times
over the years) we use it for one and only one purpose - to clone the
contents of one HDD to another HDD. In so doing, we always (or nearly
always) use a Ghost 2003 bootable floppy disk that's created through the
program or Ghost bootable CD to carry out that function. We have long since
given up on Ghost's GUI.

What I had planned to do is to step you through the disk-to-disk cloning
process using either a Ghost bootable floppy disk or bootable CD. As
apparently you know, you need the Ghost bootable floppy disk in order to
create a Ghost bootable CD.

Anyway, if there's any way you can get your hands on a system having a
floppy disk drive and want to pursue this further please let us know.
Anna
Thanks Anna for your offer!
I have been using Ghost too many times but most often in a software
testing environment where I first have installed a number of Windows
versions onto the first partition of a disk on a PC. Then after it is
configured properly but with no extra software on I have used Ghost
(probably 2003) to create an image of the root partition on the second
(larger) partition of thta disk. So we have in the end about 10-12
different Windows versions.
Then for testing we use a boot *floppy* on that system to start up
Ghost and then we write a selected image on to the root partition so
we have a fresh Windows PC to test on. This has been going on for
several years (2-3 at least). Recently we have switched to using
VirtualPC2004 instead so we do not use Ghost as much anymore.

Anyway, my experience has always been with IDE connected drives, never
before USB connected ones. The test PC is a tower unit.

Now we have those laptops that need enlarged drives and I would very
much like to do it so that they can use the whole 160 Gb as one
logical drive. However also partitioning to 60+100 Gb may cut the
mustard if I can clone the system drive onto the 60 Gb partition.
But, the laptops have no way to attach both drives via IDE, one has
always to be through USB as far as I can see.

Several years ago I faced the same hell when I tried to clone a laptop
drive and make it bootable, the final solution was to do sa follows:
- Connect both drives on a separate PC with IDE cables
- Partition the new drive into two partitions
- Format the second partition so Ghost can store data on it
- Run Ghost to create an image of the laptop drive on the second
partition.
- Then install the drive in the laptop
- Boot with the Ghost 2003 CD
- Write the image file to the root partition of the single disk

Now the darned thing could boot!
But cloning the drive on the separate PC and then installing in the
laptop *always* failed! I did not understand why at the time, but here
we go again.
There MUST be something I am doing totally wrong, but what?

PS (after rambling..), yse I do have a system with a floppy (my wife's
HP at home). How can I use that?

Note: I need to have decent USB2 support on the boot CD, so that the
USB2 connected drives can be accessed!

Thanks!


Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
B

Bo Berglund

Hi Anna,
I have now done the following since I did not have a physical floppy:
- Installed Ghost 2003 in my VPC2004 XP virtual machine
- Attached a VFD floppy image file to the virtual machine
- Used Ghost 2003 in the VM to create a bootable floppy with USB2
drivers on the floppy image.

So now I have a floppy *image* that can be used to boot into Ghost
2003, but I don't have a floppy drive on the laptop. So what I would
like to do now is to burn this image onto a CD and make it bootable.
Do you know how this can be done?
With WinImage I can put it on a real floppy if such is available, but
it is not. I would prefer to get a bootable CD...


Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
A

Anna

Thanks Anna for your offer!
I have been using Ghost too many times but most often in a software
testing environment where I first have installed a number of Windows
versions onto the first partition of a disk on a PC. Then after it is
configured properly but with no extra software on I have used Ghost
(probably 2003) to create an image of the root partition on the second
(larger) partition of thta disk. So we have in the end about 10-12
different Windows versions.
Then for testing we use a boot *floppy* on that system to start up
Ghost and then we write a selected image on to the root partition so
we have a fresh Windows PC to test on. This has been going on for
several years (2-3 at least). Recently we have switched to using
VirtualPC2004 instead so we do not use Ghost as much anymore.

Anyway, my experience has always been with IDE connected drives, never
before USB connected ones. The test PC is a tower unit.

Now we have those laptops that need enlarged drives and I would very
much like to do it so that they can use the whole 160 Gb as one
logical drive. However also partitioning to 60+100 Gb may cut the
mustard if I can clone the system drive onto the 60 Gb partition.
But, the laptops have no way to attach both drives via IDE, one has
always to be through USB as far as I can see.

Several years ago I faced the same hell when I tried to clone a laptop
drive and make it bootable, the final solution was to do sa follows:
- Connect both drives on a separate PC with IDE cables
- Partition the new drive into two partitions
- Format the second partition so Ghost can store data on it
- Run Ghost to create an image of the laptop drive on the second
partition.
- Then install the drive in the laptop
- Boot with the Ghost 2003 CD
- Write the image file to the root partition of the single disk

Now the darned thing could boot!
But cloning the drive on the separate PC and then installing in the
laptop *always* failed! I did not understand why at the time, but here
we go again.
There MUST be something I am doing totally wrong, but what?

PS (after rambling..), yse I do have a system with a floppy (my wife's
HP at home). How can I use that?

Note: I need to have decent USB2 support on the boot CD, so that the
USB2 connected drives can be accessed!

Thanks!

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com


Bo:
Well you certainly sound like an experienced Ghost 2003 user so I don't know
if the following will be of any real help to you in your present situation
since these are basic instructions for using the program. But look it over
anyway and give it a shot if you think it will be of any help...

Since you do have access to a PC with a floppy disk drive, install the Ghost
2003
program onto that machine. I hope the version you're using is the Ghost
2003.793 version - the 793 "build" being the latest (and apparently final)
version of that program. Earlier versions of the Ghost 2003 program did have
some compatibility problems of one sort or another but particularly with
cloning to a USB external HDD. Ordinarily even if you had an earlier build
it wouldn't be a problem since by using Symantec's LiveUpdate feature you
could download/install the latest version. But Symantec has recently
apparently stopped supporting Ghost 2003 and no further updates are
available a/f/a/i/k.

Here are step-by-step instructions for using the program...

Creating the bootable Ghost floppy disk.
1. Install the Ghost 2003 program on your computer.
2. Insert a blank floppy disk (it need not be formatted) and access your
Ghost program.
3. Click on Ghost Utilities.
4. Click on Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
5. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. A dialog box will appear.
a. Select the USB 2.0 Support option.
b. Select the Assign DOS drive letters option and click Next.
6. Select the Use PC-DOS option.
7. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
8. Remove floppy and label accordingly.

That's it. Now you have a Ghost bootable floppy disk which you can use to
undertake your cloning operations now and in the future. Now when you want
to clone the contents of one HD to another HD you simply insert the Ghost
bootable floppy disk in your floppy drive and boot up with both drives
connected.

NOTE: After creating the Ghost bootable floppy disk, you can create a Ghost
bootable CD from it using the Roxio or Nero CD burning programs, or most
other CD burning programs that allow you to create a bootable CD.
Unfortunately I know of no way to *directly* create this bootable CD from
the Ghost program (as you can do, for example, with the Acronis True Image
program).

Before undertaking the cloning operation ensure that the only storage
devices connected are the two HDDs that will be involved in the cloning
process, i.e., your source and destination disks. Disconnect any flash
drives, ZIP drives, etc.

Here's how to perform the cloning operation...
1. With both drives (the internal and USB external HDDs) connected, boot up
with the Ghost bootable CD). You'll get an initial screen that displays
"License
agreement warning". Right-arrow (or tab) over to the "Continue without
marking drives" button and press Enter.
2. The "About Norton Ghost" screen appears. Click OK.
3. Right-arrow twice over to the "To Disk" button and press Enter.
4. The next screen will list both your drives - the Drive 1 (source disk)
and Drive 2 (destination disk). MAKE ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN Drive 1 IS INDEED
YOUR SOURCE DISK, I.E., THE DISK YOU'RE CLONING *FROM*! Drive 1 will be
highlighted. Press Enter.
5. The next screen will have Drive 2 (destination disk) highlighted. AGAIN,
ENSURE THAT Drive 2 IS YOUR DESTINATION DISK, I.E., THE DISK YOU'RE CLONING
*TO*! Press Enter.
6. The next screen is the "Destination Drive Details" window, and reflects
your ultimate destination disk, i.e., your current Drive 2. Press your Tab
key to highlight the OK button and press Enter.
7. The "Proceed with disk clone?" dialog box will open. Left-arrow over to
the Yes button and press Enter.
8. The cloning process will begin. The data transfer speed will depend upon
the speed of your processor and the HDDs involved.
9. After you get the "Clone Completed Successfully" message, left-arrow over
to the Continue button and press Enter.
10. Down-arrow to Quit and press Enter.
11. Click Yes at the "Are you sure you want to quit?" message.
12. Remove the Ghost CD and shut down the computer.
13. I think you said that if all went well your plan was to install the
cloned HDD currently in the USB enclosure as an internal HDD in the source
machine. When you initially boot up with the newly-cloned HDD a Windows
"Found New Hardware" message will probably appear in the Desktop's
Notification Area shortly followed by a "System Settings Change"message
window informing you that new hardware has been found and asks "Do you want
to restart your computer now?" Click Yes for the reboot.
14. BTW, the reboot of the newly-cloned drive usually takes a longer time
than usual, so one must be patient. On rare occasions the system will fail
to reboot - the system will hang before reaching the Windows XP Welcome
screen. It's a rare occurrence, but it does happen. If so, simply do a
reboot.

Hope some of this helps.
Anna
 
G

Guest

Was an avid Central Point AV fan, PowerQuest PartitionMagic 7, Drive Image
2002 all now absorbed into Symantec, does anyone know where Peter Norton is
now..?
Have some early DOS books of his around here somewhere..
Symantec probably has their eye on Acronis too, kinda fond of my True Image
8..

Maybe the cloned disk's MBR has issues that TestDisk can fix..?
It's solved some HDD recovery problems for me, it can find partitions , fix
the MBR or write a new one, works on USB HDD's too..
It's a great tool to have in the Ole tool box, just in case.. It's quite
powerful, best of all it's (GPL) free..
http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk
Happy Holidays to all
j;-j
 
B

Ben

You'll need an image-mounting software like Daemon Tools...Its pretty
good software. You can get a trial version(or full version) of it by
googling daemon tools 4.1+download or go to their website and check out
the latest...
When you download adn install it, you will see a red icon with a
lighting symbol on it. Right click, click on the Emulation Sub-menu,
and choose All options on.
The icon will turn from red to green, and its ready to mount images.
right click, choose virtual CD/DVD, no media, mount image.
brows for you image file, and mout it
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Bo Berglund

The plot thickens.....
Today I got one of trhe Compaq nc8000 laptops done using Ghost 2003:
- Partition to 60gb in a USB shell
- Ghost from on-board disk to USB disk partition
- This did not work, though...
- Now put new disk in laptop and old disk in USB shell
- Boot up Ghost 2003 from a boot CD with USB2 drivers
- Ghost from external USB disk to local (new) drive partition
- After finish, disconnect USB and reboot
- Works! XP-Pro starts up like it should.
So now we have 2 out of 4 upgraded.

Now I tried to repeat a similar procedure on the other laptop (we have
3 identical units):
- Drive in USB shell, create 60 Gb partition and format to NTFS
(no need to do a failed Ghost transfer I thought)
- Set partition active, no drive letter
- Put new drive into laptop, old drive in USB2 shell
- Boot up with the same Ghost CD
- Never get to the Ghost screen, stops before mouse driver load...
- Attach USB floppy drive with Ghost boot floppy (src of the boot CD)
- Boot from floppy
- Now get to Ghost screen and select 'local partition from partition'
- Both disks are now shown but only the *new* drive is selectable as
source! the old drive is shown but disabled!
- Same if I choose local partition to image. G-2003 seems to want to
kill my old drive since it cannot be selected as the source.

So finally we gave up and downloaded Acronis TrueImage Home, installed
it on the laptop (old drive back inside the laptop) and started it.
Selected making a drive data transfer to the new drive, which by now
was in the USB2 shell and hooked up. I had also cleaned out all data
so far put on the drive using the Seagate disk tools so the drive was
now virgin.
TrueImage detected that the transfer was to be done from internal to
external drive and that it would expand the size from 38 Gb to 148 Gb.
When it was started it rebooted WinXP into a DOS-like transfer program
that connected to the USB2 drive and started to transfer data.
So far so good, but incredibly slow!

But where Ghost 2003 could transfer at speeds up to 400-500 Mb/min for
a total transfer time of about 1:25 hours True Image was MUCH slower,
it had not finished when I left work today, but from our timing it
looks like it will need 4-5 hours to copy the same amount of data!!!

So one single cloning of 37 Gb data takes 3-4 times as long with TI as
compared to Ghost 2003....

Let's hope that it works at least...

Why is it such a hassle to go from a drive to another?


Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
A

Andy

Try running MS-DOS fdisk /mbr on the cloned drive. That should zero
out the disk signature, such that the next time the drive is booted,
the disk signature will be recreated, and the disk signature
information in the registry should be fixed to correspond with the new
disk signature.
<http://support.microsoft.com/kb/166454> Using FDISK /MBR for
Troubleshooting Windows NT Boot Problems
 
M

Mike G

I D/L'd Acronix 9 on a trial basis this afternoon and made an image to my
data drive. (45Gb used/115Gb un-used)= 4.5 hrs. This was on a dual core
desktop...sata to sata HDD...you are right. slooooow!
 
B

Bo Berglund

So finally we gave up and downloaded Acronis TrueImage Home, installed
it on the laptop (old drive back inside the laptop) and started it.
Selected making a drive data transfer to the new drive, which by now
was in the USB2 shell and hooked up. I had also cleaned out all data
so far put on the drive using the Seagate disk tools so the drive was
now virgin.
TrueImage detected that the transfer was to be done from internal to
external drive and that it would expand the size from 38 Gb to 148 Gb.
When it was started it rebooted WinXP into a DOS-like transfer program
that connected to the USB2 drive and started to transfer data.
So far so good, but incredibly slow!

But where Ghost 2003 could transfer at speeds up to 400-500 Mb/min for
a total transfer time of about 1:25 hours True Image was MUCH slower,
it had not finished when I left work today, but from our timing it
looks like it will need 4-5 hours to copy the same amount of data!!!

So one single cloning of 37 Gb data takes 3-4 times as long with TI as
compared to Ghost 2003....

Let's hope that it works at least...

This morning TrueImage was showing a read error when we arrived but we
could ignore that error and let TI continue from the 98% it was stuck
at and when it finally finished it was good.
We switched the drives out and started the PC again and after a while
and one reboot the system was up and running with the new big drive as
C:.

So this is a plus point for Acronis!
The only down side is its extremely slow cloning operation. A 40 Gb
drive with 37 Gb data took about 5 hours or so to do.
And the feedback on the screen could be better by clearly showing the
data amount to copy and how much is left. Then one could more easily
see that something is going on.
But I guess this is moot now that we could upgrade the 3rd laptop as
well. the 4th need to wait after the holidays due to the speed
problem.


Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Mike G

When I did a test backup with Acronis9.0 workstation yesterday, I too had 3
disk read errors that I said "Ignore".....not much confidence to see this.
Dont know if it tried to re-read and was successful or what, so I
uninstalled ver 9.0 and downloaded the new version 10 Home. It has been
running now for 2hrs 15 minutes with an estimated 2 more hours to
go....wow!! Do not understand what causes this backup to take so much
time. The settings are at default.
 
B

Bo Berglund

When I did a test backup with Acronis9.0 workstation yesterday, I too had 3
disk read errors that I said "Ignore".....not much confidence to see this.

I think tyhat this is the source disk having errors. We saw that on
another laptop too when trying cloning with Ghost2003. Ghost did not
give an option of retry or ignore, it just bombed out. After running
chkdisk with the repair option on the laptop and then retrying Ghost
2003 we succeeded to make the clone (which did not boot of course....)
So I don't think you should blame this error on TrueImage.
Dont know if it tried to re-read and was successful or what, so I
uninstalled ver 9.0 and downloaded the new version 10 Home. It has been
running now for 2hrs 15 minutes with an estimated 2 more hours to
go....wow!! Do not understand what causes this backup to take so much
time. The settings are at default.

I also used redault settings and automatic cloning and found that it
took over 5 hours. And I was really missing a few interface
information data:
Start time, estimated end time, amount of data to copy, copied so far.
As it is now the only available info is a %-done display that shows
whole digits only, so one has to note when the digit changes, then
wait until another change and time the difference to manually estimate
process time...

Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 
G

Guest

Are you cloning or creating an image file (mybackup.tib)..? What compression
level are you using if any..? Did you defrag HHD partitions/data before you
started the image file creation..? Have you read the instructions or online
FAQ's before you started..?

As I am typing this, I am imaging to a USB drive L , my CDEFJ partitions
34GB total data used, compression High, data after compression 18GB, total
time 1hr 6min, so go figure.. Using ATI ver 8, on an Intel boxed mobo
D845PESV w/ P4 2.4B cpu, PSU Antec TP430, w/2PNY 512mb PC2700 DDR 333mhz, FSB
533mhz, so nothing really fancy or beefed up here.. Home built by myself in
2/03
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/faq/clone-windows-to-hardware/
Perhaps your doing a sector by sector backup/ may be unnecessary, may take
longer..?
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/faq/sector-by-sector-backup/
Cheers
j;-j
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Bo Berglund

Are you cloning or creating an image file (mybackup.tib)..?
Cloning the existing drive because it is is too small now...
What compression level are you using if any..?
Compression only makes sense for image files, bvut as I said we are
transferring the users data to new drives so they can continue
working. They have less that 1 Gb free space on a 40 Gb drive so they
need the new space.
Did you defrag HHD partitions/data before you
started the image file creation..?
Defragging is not possible due to the limited amount of free disk
space..
Have you read the instructions or online
FAQ's before you started..?
TrueImage was a last resort. We read the instructions on how to
proceed when getting a new larger drive for the PC. They have
instructions for this and we chose to go automatic. :)
As I am typing this, I am imaging to a USB drive L , my CDEFJ partitions
34GB total data used, compression High, data after compression 18GB, total
time 1hr 6min, so go figure.. Using ATI ver 8, on an Intel boxed mobo
D845PESV w/ P4 2.4B cpu, PSU Antec TP430, w/2PNY 512mb PC2700 DDR 333mhz, FSB
533mhz, so nothing really fancy or beefed up here.. Home built by myself in
2/03

Well, I don't know about the specifics of the Compaq NC8000 laptops
except for the hard drives (40 Gb with less than 3% free space) and
RAM (1.5 Gb RAM on these laptops).
And we are cloning, not creating a backup image file. During cloning
TrueImage first locks the whole drive then reboots the machine into a
version of TI that is running off of the boot. Nothing else is running
and it goes on for 5 hours....
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/faq/clone-windows-to-hardware/
Perhaps your doing a sector by sector backup/ may be unnecessary, may take
longer..?
We selected to clone the old drive to the new from the GUI of TI. It
gave us the choice of going automatic so we did.


Bo Berglund
bo.berglund(at)nospam.telia.com
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top