Grokster forced to close down permanently


Becky

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Following the high-profile court case of MGM et al vs. Grokster et al., the popular file-sharing software provider, Grokster, has been forced to shut down operations. The main page of Grokster's site now reads:​

The United States Supreme Court unanimously confirmed that using this service to trade copyrighted material is illegal. Copying copyrighted motion picture and music files using unauthorized peer-to-peer services is illegal and is prosectued by copyright owners.
There are legal services for downloading music and movies.​

This service is not one of them.​

This closure follows the recent ruling that the service provided by Grokster (and other similar file-sharing software providers) allows copyright breach: It was decided that Grokster should not take part in such file-sharing, whether dirctly or indirectly, and should also stop distributing it's software.​

Despite this, it seems that all is not bleak for Grokster. The company is planning a fee-based, legal version of it's software, where people pay to download copyrighted films and music tracks.​

Please feel free to let us know your thoughts on these issues - do you feel it is fair that Grokster is held to account for the actions of it's users? What is the way forward for this industry?​

Read more at Business Week and Channel Register
 

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I fail to comprehend this particular law! Now this is a prime example>Television you follow a particular program i.e. Coronation Street! But there is a film/program on another channel you wish to view later at some point, what do you do; you decide to record the film/program onto VHS/DVD; are you breaking the law? Yes you are! So why allow a company the rights to develop a recording devise that will allow you to break the law in the first instance? I would wager that 99% of people who have access or have had access to a sound recording devise i.e. cassette recorder, at some point they have recorded a song/music onto tape and probably still listen to that song/music. Therefore if the law were to be enforced what would happen; I shudder to think! The law; what law?????:confused:
 

Becky

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I think it has a lot to do with how something is used. In the case of Sony Corp. vs Universal City Studios (1984) it was ruled that the Betamax machine had 'substantial non-copyright-infringing uses'. I don't think that is the case with file-sharing software.

There is a good bit about it here :)
 
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So if recording stuff is illegal... what about Sky+

And how come there is a built in option to transfer all programs from the HDD to VCR?!

In my opinion, you pay your TV licence and fees etc, what is the difference between watching something at 9, or recording it and watching it at 10. You still have the right to watch it, legal or not.
 

Rush

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Quite simply if the film industry charged say a fiver for a new film ..piracy would disappear. Its all money grabbing ...To manufacture a DVD costs pittence so why charge extortionate prices .Its a war out there and to charge someone with piracy is nothing more than shooting Robin Hood in the back.
 
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Sexy Bex said:
I think it has a lot to do with how something is used. In the case of Sony Corp. vs Universal City Studios (1984) it was ruled that the Betamax machine had 'substantial non-copyright-infringing uses'. I don't think that is the case with file-sharing software.

There is a good bit about it here :)

Thanks SB:thumb:
The section below caught my eye, although it being in 1983! The law still stands therefore we are not breaking the law or are we?:confused:

As you so rightly say P2P file sharing is a different mater and sooner or later it will become clear/apparent as to where the public stand.:rolleyes:

I record TV/Music/radio for my own uses always have done.

Now my suggestion would be; that with modern technology Piracy could well be stopped as is what’s happening at the moment, but it takes court action to do so:eek: ! Why can they not prevent it from happening in the first place?:rolleyes:

Chris has a very good point and so has Rush. :thumb:

“Manufacturers of home video recording machines could not be liable for contributory copyright infringement for the potential uses by its purchasers, because the devices were sold for legitimate purposes and had substantial non-infringing uses. Personal use of the machines to record broadcast television programs for later viewing constituted fair use. Ninth Circuit reversed.”
 
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Adywebb

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Frankly I don't think it will make much difference, the Grokster software is still going to continue being used by the thousands of people who already have it, and there are many better alternatives out there for people to download and use.


As Rush says, the best way to reduce piracy is to reduce prices.
 

floppybootstomp

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Hollywood got no worries from me.

There have only been a handful of films I've really wanted to see in the last five years anyway.

Don't want to sound old here but have films got a bit crap or what?

'Troy' had all the makings of a really good movie. Bur Brad Pitt as Achilles? Come on, he may be a pretty boy but as a great warrior he was just not convincing.

I did quite enjoy 'It's All Gone Pete Tong' though.

The film industry argue that people who share movies are destroying the film Industry. Really? When was the last time you saw a poor film star or film exec?

Only thing killing the movie industry is a lack of imagination and formula-ridden, tear-jerking, all-American piles of poop.

Every employee in the film industry could still be well off if they sold DVD's at a fiver each.
 

muckshifter

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Does Hacking the DVD of Red Dwarf so I can watch it on my PC count ?? I don't want to copy it, just watch it.

It's illegal in other countries ... sad sods. :rolleyes:
 
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floppybootstomp said:
Hollywood got no worries from me.

Don't want to sound old here but have films got a bit crap or what?

Only thing killing the movie industry is a lack of imagination and formula-ridden, tear-jerking, all-American piles of poop.

Every employee in the film industry could still be well off if they sold DVD's at a fiver each.

I agree with all of this. First off to see a movie in the thearter is costs my almost $10.00 just for my ticket.

Second annoying thing is that there is nothing new out there... Evrything seems to be a remake or a comic book to life type deal. Now I have nothing against either... just do them right.... Batman Begins was a good interpretation of the comic(I like how they show that Batman was NOT a pretty boy behind a mask, but a bit of a tormented soul)... Fantastic 4, though fun to watch.. bad interpretation, come on... the human torch on a dirtbike attempting a back flip and burst into flames... but some how the bike dosn't blow up????

Third... a standard DVD 5 cost about $0.33, case costs about $0.20 and the cardboard insert maybe $0.10. Estimated cost of material is $0.63 I should not have to pay $24.99 for a new release.
 

floppybootstomp

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A couple of people have pointed out how cheap a DVD and packaging are.

Fair enough.

But that is not the whole picture.

Does anybody actually realise just how much money the average movie costs to make?

Many are lucky to break even on release.
 
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Adywebb

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floppybootstomp said:
A couple of people have pointed out how cheap a DVD and packaging are.

Fair enough.

But that is not the whole picture.

Does anybody actually realise just how much money the average movie costs to make?

Many are lucky to break even on release.

Very true Flops, but many don't even deserve to be released, never mind make a profit!
 

floppybootstomp

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Adywebb said:
Very true Flops, but many don't even deserve to be released, never mind make a profit!

Agreed, but that's kind of a different argument is it not? ;)

And yes, I know I made that argument myself - I'm a hypocrite, lol

(I haven't woken up yet)
 

Adywebb

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floppybootstomp said:
Agreed, but that's kind of a different argument is it not? ;)

Yep!! - getting back to the point you were making, it has parallels with what has happened in football - the few big studios are the only ones capable of paying the gross wages demanded by the top actors/actresses, they know that even if the film is a dud, if they have the top actors then it will still sell and at least break even.

The small studios just can't compete at that level, and even a fantastic film just won't get the publicity and pay for itself. Those films however are unlikely to be pirated to any great extent, so I don't think they would be affected very much.

I believe the big monopoly studios only have themselves to blame, like football they have fueled the the wages explosion themselves by creating a small 'super-elite' of actors/actresses . If they were to use some of the many underemployed actors out there, not only would the elite have to cut their demands, but it would help out those with equal talent that struggle to get noticed.

Also selling cheaper DVD films would lessen the demand for piracy, causing an increase in legitimate demand, they'd sell more and make more money - simple economics? - maybe too simple, but why not give it a go and see?
 

Rush

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With the fantastic effects new computer software packages can make , you would have thought film making costs would decrease but they dont. I think the movie industry has lost the key element in what people want to see in a film and that is to be entertained and gripped. Remember Jaws and you can humm the der der der der . How many films nowadays have cracking soundtracks that grip you . The Last best film i saw was Gladiator for the soundtrack ..does anyone else agree ?
 
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Sound tracks make a film more realistic/enjoyable! Yes I agree on that point, as for the best soundtrack now that is up to the individual My favourites are> 1“Where eagles dare” [Clint Eastwood/Richard Burton]> 2“Picnic” [Kim Novak/William Holden]>3 “Limelight” [Charles Chaplin]:thumb:
 
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Rush

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Haven`t seen any but will try to watch them to see .
Thanx
 

crazylegs

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I still think the supreme courts got it wrong on the file sharing issue....Someone somewhere was taking a nice little backhander......:D
 
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Its almost comical. They do this knowing it will make no difference. Many filesharing programs excist yet they shut down one, this is more of a scare tactic than having any real point. Its like when every so often a school girl gets arrested for having 7 britney songs on her pc just to prove a point that people can be caught. It fails to deter the majority of people and as a result companys like FACT feel then need to take big filesharing companys to court. Its crazy because every time one shuts down 2 more open up. I understand why they shut these companys down, but its not the best method for dealing with the situation. File sharing will only begin to decrease when Microsoft dont allow codecs needed to play films to run on their operating systems. And if anything that will just push many windows users onto linux.

Long live Robbin Hood.
 
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