FYI: RIAA tries to pull plug on Usenet. Seriously.


J

jim

(from http://www.news.com/8301-13578_3-9798715-38.html )

October 16, 2007 5:56 PM PDT
RIAA tries to pull plug on Usenet. Seriously.
Posted by Declan McCullagh
The Recording Industry Association of America has found a new legal target
for a copyright lawsuit: Usenet.

In a lawsuit filed on October 12, the RIAA says that Usenet newsgroups
contain "millions of copyrighted sound recordings" in violation of federal
law.

Only Usenet.com is named as a defendant for now, but the same logic would
let the RIAA sue hundreds of universities, Internet service providers, and
other newsgroup archives. AT&T offers Usenet, as does Verizon, Stanford
University and other companies including Giganews.

That's what makes this lawsuit important. If the RIAA can win against
Usenet.com, other Usenet providers are at legal risk, too.

For those of you who are relative newcomers to the Internet, Usenet was a
wildly popular way to distribute conversations and binary files long before
the Web or peer-to-peer networks existed. It's divided up into tens of
thousands of "newsgroups"--discussion areas arranged hierarchically and
sporting names like sci.med.aids, rec.motorcycles, and comp.os.linux.admin.
A handful are moderated; most are not. For efficiency's sake, recent posts
to newsgroups are stored on the Usenet provider's server (as opposed to
saved on a subscriber's computer as mailing lists are).

Some newsgroups, like alt.binaries.pictures, are devoted to the distribution
of binary files. Of particular relevance to the RIAA lawsuit is that there
are around 652 newsgroups with the phrase "MP3" in their names. (For storage
space reasons, not all Usenet providers offer binary newsgroups. Google's
Web-based interface to Usenet doesn't, for instance.)

The RIAA sued Usenet.com, which is based in Fargo, N.D., in the southern
district of New York. The lawsuit claims Usenet.com encourages its customers
to pay up to $19 a month by enticing them with copyrighted music, and asks
for a permanent injunction barring the company from "aiding, encouraging,
enabling, inducing, causing, materially contributing to, or otherwise
facilitating" copyright infringement.

There are some differences between Usenet.com and some of the other
newsgroup providers that will help the RIAA. Usenet.com boasts that signing
up for an account "gives you access to millions of MP3 files and also
enables you to post your own files the same way and share them with the
whole world."

Clearly they didn't run that language by their lawyers first.

So will the RIAA win? Thanks to improvident boasts like that, they stand a
good chance. One reason the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against Grokster is
that the justices believed that StreamCast's executives had tried to lure
pirates into using the Morpheus application. The justices also said that
neither company filtered copyrighted material and "the business models
employed by Grokster and StreamCast confirm that their principal object was
use of their software to download copyrighted works."

What the RIAA's doing here is a classic litigation strategy: sue someone who
a judge is likely to say is a clear offender, and then invoke that decision
when targeting someone who's a more marginal case. Usenet.com may be first,
in other words, but newsgroup providers like AT&T, Verizon, and Stanford may
well be next.
 
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L

Leythos

(from http://www.news.com/8301-13578_3-9798715-38.html )

October 16, 2007 5:56 PM PDT
RIAA tries to pull plug on Usenet. Seriously.
Posted by Declan McCullagh
The Recording Industry Association of America has found a new legal target
for a copyright lawsuit: Usenet.

In a lawsuit filed on October 12, the RIAA says that Usenet newsgroups
contain "millions of copyrighted sound recordings" in violation of federal
law.

Only Usenet.com is named as a defendant for now, but the same logic would
let the RIAA sue hundreds of universities, Internet service providers, and
other newsgroup archives. AT&T offers Usenet, as does Verizon, Stanford
University and other companies including Giganews.

That's what makes this lawsuit important. If the RIAA can win against
Usenet.com, other Usenet providers are at legal risk, too.

For those of you who are relative newcomers to the Internet, Usenet was a
wildly popular way to distribute conversations and binary files long before
the Web or peer-to-peer networks existed. It's divided up into tens of
thousands of "newsgroups"--discussion areas arranged hierarchically and
sporting names like sci.med.aids, rec.motorcycles, and comp.os.linux.admin.
A handful are moderated; most are not. For efficiency's sake, recent posts
to newsgroups are stored on the Usenet provider's server (as opposed to
saved on a subscriber's computer as mailing lists are).

I think it will be a great day, like the early days of Usenet, when they
stop allowing mime encoded attachments to messages. If usenet went back
to non-binaries it would be a great place again, and ISP's would not
have to outsource their service to larger companies that specialize in
Usenet service.

--

Leythos
- Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
- Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
(e-mail address removed) (remove 999 for proper email address)
 
B

BearItAll

I think it will be a great day, like the early days of Usenet, when they
stop allowing mime encoded attachments to messages. If usenet went back
to non-binaries it would be a great place again, and ISP's would not
have to outsource their service to larger companies that specialize in
Usenet service.

I agree with that, there shouldn't be a need to pass binaries in news
groups. At one time if the news group needed extra content you would just
run a web site for the extra parts.

Forums and other private groups are probably much beeter for that. In the
forums I use we do pass script and source code around, it has a size limit
of about 2M but rarely comes close to that as much of it is samples of
single functions/classes. Sometimes a jokey video has been passed, but now
this sort of thing tends to be embedded with a link to the source.

I do like to have some markup language in the forums, for hilights and
such, I don't think there is as much need for pure text news groups as
there once was. The problem there is if you allow a bit of markup, people
will always ask for more, until you get close to a full html.

odf may be better, because readers can simply filter out those bits the
user opts out of, or will miss out any section it doesn't understand. So
it should satisfy those that want to use a simple reader/editor as well as
those who want it pretty, without the loss of text.
 
S

Stephan Rose

I agree with that, there shouldn't be a need to pass binaries in news
groups. At one time if the news group needed extra content you would
just run a web site for the extra parts.

Why shouldn't there be a need?

Just because you don't have the need, why can't someone else have it?

If you don't want binaries or don't need binaries then don't go to binary
groups. It's really simple.

--
Stephan
2003 Yamaha R6

å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
 
H

HeyBub

BearItAll said:
I agree with that, there shouldn't be a need to pass binaries in news
groups. At one time if the news group needed extra content you would
just run a web site for the extra parts.

We run into this conflict all the time, as in "No one NEEDS an assault
rifle!"

"Need" is not the operative word; "Want" is.
 
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F

Free Phones

Mick Murphy said:
Yawn!!!!

Who cares!!!!


It is nice to know where to find a copy of an os that works in case Bill
Gates decides to pull the plug everytime he thinks somebody is a criminal.
Hopefully, if Vista stops working we can go to usenet to get a working copy
to get OUR data back. Of course, now a days some people think it is a crime
to take back your own property that you paid for.

Floyd


--
Mostly Free Phones dot com has many free smart phones
Unlocked phones with no contract also
batteries and accessories

survivaldealer dot com
witchwellenergy dot com
 
T

The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly

jim said:
(from http://www.news.com/8301-13578_3-9798715-38.html )

October 16, 2007 5:56 PM PDT
RIAA tries to pull plug on Usenet. Seriously.
Posted by Declan McCullagh
The Recording Industry Association of America has found a new legal target
for a copyright lawsuit: Usenet.

In a lawsuit filed on October 12, the RIAA says that Usenet newsgroups
contain "millions of copyrighted sound recordings" in violation of federal
law.

Only Usenet.com is named as a defendant for now, but the same logic would
let the RIAA sue hundreds of universities, Internet service providers, and
other newsgroup archives. AT&T offers Usenet, as does Verizon, Stanford
University and other companies including Giganews.

That's what makes this lawsuit important. If the RIAA can win against
Usenet.com, other Usenet providers are at legal risk, too.

For those of you who are relative newcomers to the Internet, Usenet was a
wildly popular way to distribute conversations and binary files long before
the Web or peer-to-peer networks existed. It's divided up into tens of
thousands of "newsgroups"--discussion areas arranged hierarchically and
sporting names like sci.med.aids, rec.motorcycles, and comp.os.linux.admin.
A handful are moderated; most are not. For efficiency's sake, recent posts
to newsgroups are stored on the Usenet provider's server (as opposed to
saved on a subscriber's computer as mailing lists are).

Some newsgroups, like alt.binaries.pictures, are devoted to the distribution
of binary files. Of particular relevance to the RIAA lawsuit is that there
are around 652 newsgroups with the phrase "MP3" in their names. (For storage
space reasons, not all Usenet providers offer binary newsgroups. Google's
Web-based interface to Usenet doesn't, for instance.)

The RIAA sued Usenet.com, which is based in Fargo, N.D., in the southern
district of New York. The lawsuit claims Usenet.com encourages its customers
to pay up to $19 a month by enticing them with copyrighted music, and asks
for a permanent injunction barring the company from "aiding, encouraging,
enabling, inducing, causing, materially contributing to, or otherwise
facilitating" copyright infringement.

There are some differences between Usenet.com and some of the other
newsgroup providers that will help the RIAA. Usenet.com boasts that signing
up for an account "gives you access to millions of MP3 files and also
enables you to post your own files the same way and share them with the
whole world."

Clearly they didn't run that language by their lawyers first.

So will the RIAA win? Thanks to improvident boasts like that, they stand a
good chance. One reason the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against Grokster is
that the justices believed that StreamCast's executives had tried to lure
pirates into using the Morpheus application. The justices also said that
neither company filtered copyrighted material and "the business models
employed by Grokster and StreamCast confirm that their principal object was
use of their software to download copyrighted works."

What the RIAA's doing here is a classic litigation strategy: sue someone who
a judge is likely to say is a clear offender, and then invoke that decision
when targeting someone who's a more marginal case. Usenet.com may be first,
in other words, but newsgroup providers like AT&T, Verizon, and Stanford may
well be next.

Those [email protected]#$%^&*[email protected] copyright nazis!

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

"Fair use is not merely a nice concept--it is a federal law based on
free speech rights under the First Amendment and is a cornerstone of the
creativity and innovation that is a hallmark of this country. Consumer
rights in the digital age are not frivolous."
- Maura Corbett
 
L

Leythos

Why shouldn't there be a need?

Just because you don't have the need, why can't someone else have it?

If you don't want binaries or don't need binaries then don't go to binary
groups. It's really simple.

My guess is that you didn't know about Usenet until after your first MS
PC, and MS was late getting into the Usenet world.

Usenet was setup to allow groups to share information on related topics.
In the early days you could not pass files (mime attachments), but when
it was updated to also work over SMTP it had to follow the email
standards which included attachments.

Since the time that people started posting attachments to replies/posts,
Usenet has suffered for it, causing some service providers to drop
Usenet access some to block it, others invest massive resources into
maintaining it, others have little retention, etc....

The only reason to share files via usenet is anonymity - meaning that
you can post as an unknown and share that file with the unknown masses.
This makes it a perfect means to pirate or distribute media that you
would not want to be associated with normally.

It's not as simple as avoiding the binary groups - idiots post files to
non-binary groups all the time, and if we did away with the entire
binary designation, in order to fight piracy, they would still post to
Usenet in some other group.

Almost 1TB per day is associated with binaries on busy servers.

--

Leythos
- Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
- Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
(e-mail address removed) (remove 999 for proper email address)
 
A

Adam Albright

Since the time that people started posting attachments to replies/posts,
Usenet has suffered for it, causing some service providers to drop
Usenet access some to block it, others invest massive resources into
maintaining it, others have little retention, etc....

The only reason to share files via usenet is anonymity - meaning that
you can post as an unknown and share that file with the unknown masses.
This makes it a perfect means to pirate or distribute media that you
would not want to be associated with normally.

It's not as simple as avoiding the binary groups - idiots post files to
non-binary groups all the time, and if we did away with the entire
binary designation, in order to fight piracy, they would still post to
Usenet in some other group.

Almost 1TB per day is associated with binaries on busy servers.

When will you babbling idiots ever STFU? I mean to begin with you
NEVER know WHAT you're babbling about. You seem to have a distorted
view of newsgroups. Ask any ISP or third party provider that offers
access to premium news servers for a fee and they'll all tell you the
same thing. BINARIES by far makes up the vast majority of traffic,
some claim over 90% of what travels over Usenet, most of it porn
distributed in thousands of different newsgroups. So-called warez
group where pirated copies of software or simply copies of legit
software are posted complete with cracks, passwords and other keys
makes up a tiny fraction of traffic as does music posted to a handful
of newsgroups set up for that purpose.

As far as idiots, you seem to be a member in good standing of that
club. Usenet was formed with one purpose in mind. NO RULES. I know. I
was there from the beginning. Yet there are always bozos like you that
always attempt to impose and enforce rules you think would fit your
distorted view of what others may enjoy. For example posting binary
attachments to so-called non-binary groups. Since newsgroups by nature
have no rules and even if they did nobody could enforce them such
thinking is half-ass backwards. Over the 100,000+ newsgroups in
existence, a small handful, meaning in the dozens, are moderated. Only
those have "rules" that mean anything. Everywhere else, just some bozo
trying to enforce HIS idea of what should or shouldn't be posted.
 
L

Leythos

When will you babbling idiots ever STFU? I mean to begin with you
NEVER know WHAT you're babbling about. You seem to have a distorted
view of newsgroups. Ask any ISP or third party provider that offers
access to premium news servers for a fee and they'll all tell you the
same thing. BINARIES by far makes up the vast majority of traffic,
some claim over 90% of what travels over Usenet, most of it porn
distributed in thousands of different newsgroups. So-called warez
group where pirated copies of software or simply copies of legit
software are posted complete with cracks, passwords and other keys
makes up a tiny fraction of traffic as does music posted to a handful
of newsgroups set up for that purpose.

So, the majority of the crap is files, which is what I said - so that
makes you more of an idiot then me - as you just argued that you agree
with me.
As far as idiots, you seem to be a member in good standing of that
club. Usenet was formed with one purpose in mind. NO RULES.

Bull crap - only an idiot would believe that.
I know. I
was there from the beginning.

I was posting to Usenet in 84, I don't believe you were using it then,
you certainly don't have the technical skills to have used a computer
that long.
Yet there are always bozos like you that
always attempt to impose and enforce rules you think would fit your
distorted view of what others may enjoy. For example posting binary
attachments to so-called non-binary groups. Since newsgroups by nature
have no rules and even if they did nobody could enforce them such
thinking is half-ass backwards.

Again, you believe that you are right and the world is wrong. There only
place where chaos rules is ALT groups, and that's the Usenet standard.
Over the 100,000+ newsgroups in
existence, a small handful, meaning in the dozens, are moderated. Only
those have "rules" that mean anything. Everywhere else, just some bozo
trying to enforce HIS idea of what should or shouldn't be posted.

Yea, like you trying to be rude to everyone that posts anything.

--

Leythos
- Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
- Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
(e-mail address removed) (remove 999 for proper email address)
 
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A

Adam Albright

Bull crap - only an idiot would believe that.


I was posting to Usenet in 84, I don't believe you were using it then,
you certainly don't have the technical skills to have used a computer
that long.

Seeing some the slop you've posted what you believe and reality rarely
meet. You fanboy wannabe types are quite funny to read when you get
your underwear all bunched up like yours obviously are right now. If
you first started posting in 1984, you came to the party very late. It
began quite innocently in late 1979.
 
S

Stephan Rose

It is nice to know where to find a copy of an os that works in case Bill
Gates decides to pull the plug everytime he thinks somebody is a
criminal. Hopefully, if Vista stops working we can go to usenet to get a
working copy to get OUR data back. Of course, now a days some people
think it is a crime to take back your own property that you paid for.

It's almost getting to the point where it's becoming a crime to simply
use the data you paid money for....

--
Stephan
2003 Yamaha R6

å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
 
L

Leythos

Seeing some the slop you've posted what you believe and reality rarely
meet. You fanboy wannabe types are quite funny to read when you get
your underwear all bunched up like yours obviously are right now. If
you first started posting in 1984, you came to the party very late. It
began quite innocently in late 1979.

And you were not there then and not there until, well, you're not all
here now either.

So, you've proven my point again sonny.

--

Leythos
- Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
- Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
(e-mail address removed) (remove 999 for proper email address)
 
L

Leythos

Actually Leythos....the latest estimates are upwards of 3 TB/day.

Thanks, my data is a year old or so, since I don't really monitor it any
more. I bought generic service since my ISP outsourced their servers
because of the BINARY LOAD and you only get updates every 15 minutes -
this service is instant.

--

Leythos
- Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
- Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling a
drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
(e-mail address removed) (remove 999 for proper email address)
 
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A

Adam Albright

And you were not there then and not there until, well, you're not all
here now either.
So, you've proven my point again sonny.

How would you know? You're just another self-important idiot like
Frank. Thanks for proving whatever you say comes out of thin air or
your ass. Tell us Which.
 
A

Adam Albright

Thanks, my data is a year old or so, since I don't really monitor it any
more.

LOL! That doesn't stop you from blubbering whatever pops in your head
though does it. You were "only" off by 300%. That's what I mean about
you self-important wannabe expert types. All talk, mostly bluff. You
can't backup ANYTHING you claim. You just got proved wrong. Again.
Till the next time. I'm sure we won't have to wait long. ;-)
 
J

Jone Doe

Adam Albright said:
LOL! That doesn't stop you from blubbering whatever pops in your head
though does it. You were "only" off by 300%. That's what I mean about
you self-important wannabe expert types. All talk, mostly bluff. You
can't backup ANYTHING you claim. You just got proved wrong. Again.
Till the next time. I'm sure we won't have to wait long. ;-)

Well, that's because 97.3% of statistics are made up on the spot.
 
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F

Frank

Adam said:
How would you know? You're just another self-important idiot like
Frank. Thanks for proving whatever you say comes out of thin air or
your ass. Tell us Which.
Frank has taken over whats left of your demented brain. Frank was won
all battles with you yet you keep flapping your fat jowls like a chicken
with it's head cut off.
You are the ng's best, biggest and most famous loud mouth h as*hole idiot.
A title you so warmly deserve.
Congratulations!
Frank
 

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