"Footnote cont'd on next page" message. How?


K

Ken

Office Word 2007

I remember, in previous versions of Word, that you could format footnotes so
that if the text of the note continued on the next page, it would say
"Footnote continued on next page" at the bottom, and on the continuation it
would say "Footnote continued from previous page."

How, in 2007?

Thanks.

Ken Isaacson
SILENT COUNSEL, a legal thriller
www.KenIsaacson.com
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

This is actually handled much the same in Word 2007, but you may well have
forgotten how to access it in previous versions. First you have to have at
least one footnote in the document. Then switch to Draft view and choose
Show Notes in the Footnotes chunk on the References tab. In the footnote
pane, click the dropdown arrow and choose Footnote Continuation Notice. Type
your desired notice text, then close the pane and switch back to Print
Layout view.

A caveat: This may have improved in more recent versions, but the first time
I tried using a continuation notice (many versions back), ISTR that Word
allowed space for it at the bottom of every page (whether a notice was
needed or not). I may be mistaken about that, but what I do definitely
recall that, when I changed my mind and decided not to use the notice, Word
was still allowing space for it anyway.
 
K

Ken

Thanks. You're right...I did forget how to do it on the other versions.

That being said, and now having been able to create the continuation
notice...another thing I've forgotten is whether the continued portion of
the footnote, appearing on the following page, ever had a notice advising
that it's continued _from_ the _previous_ page.

Best,
Ken Isaacson
SILENT COUNSEL, a legal thriller
www.KenIsaacson.com
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

No, there was never a "continued from" notice. The Footnote Continuation
Separator is judged sufficient indication of that. Of course, it helps on
both ends if you can maneuver the footnote into breaking in the middle of a
sentence or some other obviously incomplete point.
 

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