Epson paper in Canon printer


R

Rescho

Has anyone used Epson paper in a Canon s9000 printer?
Specifically the paper is Epson S041706 Premium Glossy Photo Paper 255gsm.
I'd be interested in knowing the results.
Thanks
Rescho
 
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S

SleeperMan

Rescho said:
...or any Canon printer that uses BCI-6X series cartridges.
Rescho

Not me yet, but i did hear that Epson papers do quite nicely on Canon
printers...i must try one day. But i did try HP everyday semigloss photo
paper on my ip4000 and ....disaster! Ink doesn't dry at all on that one...
 
R

Ryadia

Rescho said:
Has anyone used Epson paper in a Canon s9000 printer?
Specifically the paper is Epson S041706 Premium Glossy Photo Paper 255gsm.
I'd be interested in knowing the results.
Thanks
Rescho
I had a s9000 last year and sold it due to pictures fading when not exposed
to light. I discovered that the papers which provide "instant" drying are
the cause and Epson's premium gloss is one of them. They have ceramic dust
for the surface which absorbs the inks but doesn't actually allow them to
dry.

Anyway, the paper produces excellent photos from these printers. I found the
longest lasting results came from 'rag based' matte papers and had good
lasting results with Canson semi gloss paper. Not much difference between
this and the gloss stuff but it takes time for the inks to dry.

I have some prints made a year ago with an Epson r310 printer on Epson
S041706 paper that lay around on the counter at my shop. I also have some on
the same paper from the s9000 and you can see very bad image fade. My advise
on the Canon is that they make very nice prints that have to be kept away
from the atmosphere. You can do this either by laminating the prints or
framing them and taping the back of the frame to seal it. You might also get
away with keeping them between leaves of a photo album. Incidently... If you
want to test a print for fading, make one and put a strip of sticky tape
over a part of it, put it in the path of an airconditioner and check it in 3
or 4 weeks.

Doug
 
A

Arthur Entlich

There are two main types of specialty papers used for inkjet printers,
having quite different technologies. There are others, but they are
mainly fine art type papers. I am speaking here of "photo" type papers.

One is Microporous papers, and the other is swellable polymer.

Microporous papers have a ceramic coating on them which is like a glaze,
which allows the ink to pass through the layer. That layer is
transparent and the ink is stored below it usually in a kaolin clay type
substrate. These are instant dry (to the touch) papers. It is true that
the ink takes longer to dry than it appears to when the print comes out
of the printer, but they do not remain wet indefinitely. They probably
dry fully within 24-48 hours at most if left in an unsealed condition.
It is not recommended that prints of this nature be framed or laminated,
or placed in a plastic unbreathable storage envelope prior to they
drying fully. Some people hasten the drying by placing them between
some highly adsorbent paper, like clean (unprinted) newsprint. The main
components that need to come off the ink are glycols which are slower
drying. The alcohol and water evaporate pretty quickly in most
environments unless it is very high relative humidity.

These papers do not hold the ink into the paper as well as others,
because the pores remain open. In some cases of certain dyes, the ink
was found to fade within 24-48 hours if left completely exposed to an
environment where there was a lot of air current. So, with this type of
paper it is best to keep them out of situations that accelerate
evaporation, or agitate the air. Again, placing them in a room with
20-40% relative humidity with a piece of paper laid over the top is a
good way to allow these to cure. These papers are often waterproof, or
nearly so, once dry. However, the surface may be vulnerable to coming
off if tape or something similar is applied taking off the microporous
coating, and changing the texture of the paper, and removing some of the
ink. These papers usually also work with pigmented inks.

Swellable polymer is another paper surface technology. In this case,
the fluid part of the ink liquefies the surface of the paper and causes
it to swell. The ink literally becomes incorporated into the surface of
the paper, and is in part protected by the polymer, which in part covers
the ink as it mixes. These papers usually are slow drying because the
amount of liquid necessary to wet the paper and temporarily dissolve the
surface has to be enough to soften the surface, and then it needs to dry
and reharden. Gelatin is a form of a swellable polymer. Today resins
are often used. These papers, although slow drying, give better
permanence to dye colorant inks. They tend to remain vulnerable to
water and fingerprints, but they usually don't have a surface that comes
off with an adhesive as easily as microporous papers do. These papers
often do not work well with pigment colorant inks, because those inks
have solid matter and resins incorporated, making them less likely to
integrate into the surface properly. Also, the extra solids tend to
make high ink areas look matte, even with a glossy paper.

In general, Epson and Canon use Micropore papers with their printers,
because it has a very shiny surface, and is "instant dry" to the touch.
Epson makes a swellable option called Colorlife which is swellable
polymer, and it is specially designed to improve color permanence of
their dye inks. I believe this paper is made for them by Ilford
Switzerland, and sold as the "non-classic" version.

HP seems to use principally swellable polymer papers, which might
explain why they get better fade resistance with dye inks. Epson offers
their Durabrite and Ultrachromes products as their long life inks.

Art
 
W

Wolf Kirchmeir

Rescho said:
...or any Canon printer that uses BCI-6X series cartridges.
Rescho

Yes, in i960, worked well. IBM glossy also worked. Kodak's glossy paaper
did not.
 
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H

Harry

I haven't used Epson paper in my Canon Printer. However, if you are
based in the UK, Jessops photo gloss paper in my opinion gives better
results than Canon's own paper in both 865 and iP4000 printers.

It also gave better results than Epson's paper in my old Epson 830u
photo printer.

I carried out 'blind' (i.e no one knew which paper had been used for
each print) tests with friends using 6 or 7 brands and Jessops came
out on top very significantly in each case. Other 'cheap' brands did
less well than the main brands.

I now use Jessops Photo Gloss paper for all my prints.

Harry
 
R

ray

Arthur Entlich said:
There are two main types of specialty papers used for inkjet printers,
having quite different technologies. There are others, but they are
mainly fine art type papers. I am speaking here of "photo" type papers.

One is Microporous papers, and the other is swellable polymer.

Thank you for the excellent tutorial on paper types. I will add from
my limited experience with canon printer that they seem to like
the microporous paper. Some of this type that have worked well
for me are Canon, Epson, Konica, and Office Depot. Most of
the others that I tried were probably the swellable polymer type.
The ink pools on the surface, colors mix, and when dry have a
bronzing effect.
 
R

Rescho

Thanks for the replies, particularly Art's detailed explanation.
The reason I ask is that I want to print some panoramas and the only inkjet paper I
can find in rolls in Australia (so far) is Epson.
(Before you hit the keyboards , yes I know that the largest print dimension in a
Canon s9000 is 23" but that should be adequate for now)
Rescho
 
A

Arthur Entlich

I wonder if Jessops isn't Konica QP paper.

Konica makes a beautiful high gloss, fairly heavy weight paper that I
have always really liked the results with Epson printers. I understand
it is often sold as a store brand. In the US, I believe it is sold in
Office Depot as their own store product.

I have yet to find the product sold in Canada under a store brand,
although there is a product sold in Future Shop that looks a bit like it
might be Konica. Still not sure about that one.

Art
 
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A

Arthur Entlich

Interesting that your posting shows up soon after another discussing
Jessop's paper. As I mentioned there, it is very possible Jessop's is
Konica, store-branded. In the US, Office Depot's paper is Konica made.

Sadly, Office Depot paper in Canada is some other type, and not as nice.

Konica QP is a very nice paper, as microporous papers go.

Art
 
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