Do I need a new power supply?


F

Frustrated

I've been getting the dreaded blue screen of death periodically. I ran
ram checkers on my Corsair 1 GB dual channel memory and everything is
fine. The BSO messages say device error or device driver error.

I get the BSO even while running Windows 7 with similar messages.

My configuration is:

Asus LG 775 MB
Pentium D 2.8 GHZ
512 MB x2 Corsair dual channel RAM
128 MB AGP 8x Video
Onboard Sound
17 inch LCD Monitor
1 Floppy Drive
1 USB keyboard
1 USB hub from monitor
1 USB extension cable
1 USB wireless mouse
1 CD/DVD ROM drive (8x)
1 x 250 GB Maxtor Drive 7200 RPM
1 x 250 GB WD 7200 RPM drive
2 x 500 GB Hitachi drive (previously 1x 1000 GB Seagate Drive)
1 400 Watt PSP PSU: +3.3V 28 OA, +5V 30 OA, +12V1 18OA, +12V2=18 OA,
+5Vsb=2.5A, 12V=0.5 A
(+3.3V& 5v) = 180 W, +12V1 & 12V= 348 W MAX.
 
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J

John Doe

Frustrated said:
I've been getting the dreaded blue screen of death periodically.
I ran ram checkers on my Corsair 1 GB dual channel memory and
everything is fine. The BSO messages say device error or device
driver error.

I get the BSO even while running Windows 7 with similar messages.

Keep in mind that power supply issues can include your house current.
In other words, if the indication is that you have bad power, it might
be something behind your power supply. Not saying it is, just pointing
out another possibility.

Good luck.
 
P

Paul

Frustrated said:
I've been getting the dreaded blue screen of death periodically. I ran
ram checkers on my Corsair 1 GB dual channel memory and everything is
fine. The BSO messages say device error or device driver error.

I get the BSO even while running Windows 7 with similar messages.

My configuration is:

Asus LG 775 MB
Pentium D 2.8 GHZ
512 MB x2 Corsair dual channel RAM
128 MB AGP 8x Video
Onboard Sound
17 inch LCD Monitor
1 Floppy Drive
1 USB keyboard
1 USB hub from monitor
1 USB extension cable
1 USB wireless mouse
1 CD/DVD ROM drive (8x)
1 x 250 GB Maxtor Drive 7200 RPM
1 x 250 GB WD 7200 RPM drive
2 x 500 GB Hitachi drive (previously 1x 1000 GB Seagate Drive)
1 400 Watt PSP PSU: +3.3V 28 OA, +5V 30 OA, +12V1 18OA, +12V2=18 OA,
+5Vsb=2.5A, 12V=0.5 A
(+3.3V& 5v) = 180 W, +12V1 & 12V= 348 W MAX.

Have you recorded all the numbers from the BSOD ?

You can look up stop errors here.

http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm

You can disable automatic restarts, if you need the BSOD message
to stay still on the screen. The BSOD may also be recorded in the
Event Viewer.

http://askbobrankin.com/auto-restart.jpg (untick the box)

If the name of a device driver is mentioned for each BSOD,
that may hint at the device that has a problem.

If the device is storage related, you might try a hard drive
diagnostic from the company that makes the disk.

It is important to note the circumstances of the BSOD if possible.
For example, say the hard drive is damaged, and you run CHKDSK,
thinking the problem is a file structure. If the disk cannot
write data without corruption, you could lose everything.
Same goes for functions like defrag. Commands like that
are only safe, if it looks like the basic hardware is
perfectly functioning. Using utilities that move a lot
of data, in the face of flaky operation, can yield big
disasters.

You may want to make sure you have some kind of backup of
what is on disk, in case something bad happens.

Paul
 
F

Frustrated

John Doe wrote:
:: Keep in mind that power supply issues can include your house current.
:: In other words, if the indication is that you have bad power, it
:: might be something behind your power supply. Not saying it is, just
:: pointing out another possibility.

Good tip. I live in a apartment hi-rise less than 15 years old. The power
is very stable and no anomolies reported with other devices or computers.

In addition, I forgot to mention I have about 3 fans working too in the
computer too. If I h ad to guess, I would say this all is likely causing
some instability. Maybe even the case isn't grounded properly too. I know I
added felt washers when I built it a few years ago.
 
F

Frustrated

Paul wrote:
:: ::
:: Have you recorded all the numbers from the BSOD ?

Yes. Nothing worthwhile. Stop errors some pointing to kernel 32. Even when
connected to Microsoft no meaningful info is described.
::
:: You can look up stop errors here.
::
:: http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm
::
:: You can disable automatic restarts, if you need the BSOD message
:: to stay still on the screen. The BSOD may also be recorded in the
:: Event Viewer.
::
:: http://askbobrankin.com/auto-restart.jpg (untick the box)
::
:: If the name of a device driver is mentioned for each BSOD,
:: that may hint at the device that has a problem.:: It is important to note
the circumstances of the BSOD if possible.
:: For example, say the hard drive is damaged, and you run CHKDSK,
:: thinking the problem is a file structure. If the disk cannot
:: write data without corruption, you could lose everything.
:: Same goes for functions like defrag. Commands like that
:: are only safe, if it looks like the basic hardware is
:: perfectly functioning. Using utilities that move a lot
:: of data, in the face of flaky operation, can yield big
:: disasters.
::
:: You may want to make sure you have some kind of backup of
:: what is on disk, in case something bad happens.

Very good tip....I completely forgot about the implications of defrag and
chdsk on the file structure on a drive that may not be working well. I've
been a victim of this once before.
 
W

westom

Very good tip....I completely forgot about the implications of defrag and
chdsk on the file structure on a drive that may not be working well.  I've
been a victim of this once before.

Defrag and chkdsk will not fix problems that result in BSOD. AC
power is also and obviously completely irrelevant to your BSOD. How
useful is that BSOD message? Numbers and words provide massive
information to those who know this stuff. Same probably means little
to you. That is why you are posting here. Your useful replies will
be from the few who actually understand what that BSOD is saying. Who
are sufficiently informed as to not blame bad household current - a
classic myth - for such problems.

Your replies will only be as useful as the information provided.
That means posting those BSODs as Paul has requested. Otherwise
expect more responses from the least technically informed such as
blaming household current.
 
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J

JIMMIE

 Defrag and chkdsk will not fix problems that result in BSOD.  AC
power is also and obviously completely irrelevant to your BSOD.  How
useful is that BSOD message?  Numbers and words provide massive
information to those who know this stuff.  Same probably means little
to you.  That is why you are posting here.  Your useful replies will
be from the few who actually understand what that BSOD is saying.  Who
are sufficiently informed as to not blame bad household current - a
classic myth - for such problems.

  Your replies will only be as useful as the information provided.
That means posting those BSODs as Paul has requested.   Otherwise
expect more responses from the least technically informed such as
blaming household current.

I was recently getiing the same problem and did a little research and
found that there were updates to several of the drivers I was using.
Replaced the drivers and everything has been working great since. That
was about 4 months ago.. I did kind of a shotgun upgraded and I dont
know if there was one particular driver at fault. I also dont know
anything abot the BSOD messages I was getting. One other thing I did
was reseat all the circuit cards. This was something I used to do
roughly simi annually when I clean out the dust but hadnt done it to
this computer since it was new about two years ago. I chalked the
repair up to just general hardware and software maintenace which I had
neglected to do. Also I had neglected the cleaning. Your guess is as
good, probably better, than mind as to which action fixed it.


Jimmie

Jimmie
 
W

westom

One other thing I did was reseat all the circuit cards. This was
something I used to do roughly simi annually when I clean out the
dust but hadnt done it to this computer since it was new about
two years ago.

If reseating a card fixes it, then the card is 100% defective. Any
'corrosion' that might form in a connector is made completely
irrelevant in design. But when myths promote 'maintenance', then
reseating myths get promoted. Another symptom of a tech without
electrical knowledge is using an eraser to 'clean' contacts. At least
one tech got 'reassigned' for using such repair techniques.
 
C

Charlie

One other thing I did was reseat all the circuit cards. This was
something I used to do roughly simi annually when I clean out the
dust but hadnt done it to this computer since it was new about
two years ago.
If reseating a card fixes it, then the card is 100% defective.

The slot connector that the card fits into is often the problem that
reseating fixes. So stating that the card is defective if reseating
fixes it is poor advice.
Any 'corrosion' that might form in a connector is made completely
irrelevant in design.

Please explain.
But when myths promote 'maintenance', then reseating myths get
promoted.

I'm not sure how you determine that reseating or anything else is a
myth. It couldn't be from first hand knowledge (actually trying it).
Another symptom of a tech without electrical knowledge is using an
eraser to
'clean' contacts. At least one tech got 'reassigned' for using such
repair
techniques.

To a better paying job?

Charlie
 
Z

Z

I've been getting the dreaded blue screen of death periodically.  I ran
ram checkers on my Corsair 1 GB dual channel memory and everything is
fine.  The BSO messages say device error or device driver error.

I get the BSO even while running Windows 7 with similar messages.

My configuration is:

Asus LG 775 MB
Pentium D 2.8 GHZ
512 MB x2 Corsair dual channel RAM
128 MB AGP 8x Video
Onboard Sound
17 inch LCD Monitor
1 Floppy Drive
1 USB keyboard
1 USB hub from monitor
1 USB extension cable
1 USB wireless mouse
1 CD/DVD ROM drive (8x)
1 x 250 GB Maxtor Drive 7200 RPM
1 x 250 GB WD 7200 RPM drive
2 x 500 GB Hitachi drive (previously 1x 1000 GB Seagate Drive)
1 400 Watt PSP PSU:  +3.3V 28 OA,  +5V 30 OA, +12V1 18OA, +12V2=18 OA,
+5Vsb=2.5A, 12V=0.5 A
(+3.3V& 5v) = 180 W,  +12V1 & 12V= 348 W MAX.

WinXP is currently a better version than 7 or Vi$ta for your case I
think. as where I am living, others would said that sometimes you can
see the BSOD when the temperature get too high somewhere in your
computer case, especially if you haven't cleaned it for a long time or
it gets aging (maybe the quality of your hardware is not quite good).
also some software, hardware, drivers you got recently makes a bad
compatibility with your own computer system, what makes you see the
Blue Screen of Death. as I do, I will remove the ones recently got. if
the BSOD shows again, I would remove the whole system directories,
then reinstall with the original setup version, update all the
patches, install the newest drivers. some apps could be the origin of
the BSOD, those apps should all have other better replaceable ones.
You must not install those unstable apps. the hot top apps are always
stable or have recent stable versions. after the installation of those
ones, you can add the apps that are uncertain whether are stable or
not, one by one. if the BSOD shows, you may roll back the installation
untill the BSOD won't shows, and now you'll make sure which one is
unstable. if those measures don't work well, you may try some lower
level measures which have been posted by others above. ah, you should
make sure your HDD is in well condition at the first using some HDD
scanning software, or back up your imortant data on your HDDs which
are not the one for booting. and what's more, you should make sure
your room voltage is not too low nor too high...
it seems a bit too long I've written, and I'm not sure whether it
would be read wholly as well as whether it could be helpful as an
article so long... whereas I'm concentrated at my poor English...
 
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W

westom

I'm not sure how you determine that reseating or anything else is a
myth.  It couldn't be from first hand knowledge (actually trying it).

Manufacturer specifications and a few generations of design
experience have well proven that fact. Reseating to fix a problem
means the problem remains unsolved. Reseating is speculation promoted
by those incapable of locating that onboard failure. They blame only
what they understand.

Which should I believe? Generations of experience and numeric specs
from every connector manufacturer? Or claims that were popular myths
even 40 years ago? Myths too routinely promoted by untrained techs
and not supported by even one fact.

These 'reseat the connector' myths are proven with insults and
mockery. Identifying symptoms of the least knowledgeable. Basic
engineering numbers mean a design works normally even under worst case
connector conditions. Amazing how many know otherwise due to
hearsay.

Those with poorest training always know using only observation. Are
typical of A+ Certified computer techs who need not know how
electricity works to become certified. Who *know* only using mockery
and insult.

Reseating connectors was always a first symptom of techs not likely
to make the cut.
 
M

Mike Tomlinson

Charlie said:
So stating that the card is defective if reseating
fixes it is poor advice.

Par for the course from westom.
Please explain.

He won't, he'll just bullshit and wave his hands.
I'm not sure how you determine that reseating or anything else is a
myth. It couldn't be from first hand knowledge (actually trying it).

Quite. He's an armchair critic with no real-world experience.
To a better paying job?

Let's hope so. Cleaning card and memory contacts with an eraser is a
tried and tested technique. Of course, westom, not having and real-
world experience, doesn't know that.

Hey Tom! Going to answer these questions or not?

from "Bud~":

Still never answered - embarrassing questions:

- Why do the only 2 examples of protection in the IEEE guide use plug-in
suppressors?

- Why does the NIST guide says plug-in suppressors are "the easiest
solution"?

- Why does the IEEE guide say in one example "the only effective way of
protecting the equipment is to use a multiport protector"?

- In the IEEE example how would a service panel suppressor provide any
protection?

- Why does SquareD say "electronic equipment may need additional
protection by installing plug-in [suppressors] at the point of use."

For real science read the IEEE and NIST guides. Both say plug-in
suppressors are effective.

from me:

"You've claimed this on many occasions over many years [to work for a
"PSU shop"] but have never posted any evidence when challenged, for
example your claim that you have a degree. When challenged to provide
evidence of same (by anybody), you've invariably gone quiet or reverted
to personal attacks."

And this one (odd how my prediction came true, isn't it?)

"Explain how [to measure ripple voltage with a multimeter] in words of
one syllable, with numbers. (You won't, of course; you'll run away like
you usually do when challenged.)"

And this one?

"And how exactly do you put the PSU of a non-booting PC under maximum
load?"

And a new one?

"Can we please have a formal definition of a "computer grade" UPS?"

<fx: tumbleweed>
 
C

Charlie

Manufacturer specifications

I fail to see how manufacturer specifications prove anything. At least
in this context.
and a few generations of design experience have well proven that fact.

One of the main considerations in designing a connector (or almost
anything else) is cost. It has been my observation that connectors in
home computer equipment are designed to be made as cheaply as possible.
Heat and other environmental conditions can cause the integrity of the
connection to be compromised. Reseating can often fix the connection,
sometimes for the remaining life of the machine. If you have to
continue to fix by reseating often then you *may* have a defective card
or a defective slot connector.
Reseating to fix a problem means the problem remains unsolved.
Huh?

Reseating is speculation promoted by those incapable of locating that
onboard > failure.

Reseating can fix a flakey connection caused by very tiny amounts of
contaminants, corrosion or worn plating. Certainly it can mask other
problems like a hairline crack in a trace on the card or poor solder
joint on the slot connecter etc., but those are in my experience much
less likely.
They blame only what they understand.

I'm afraid I don't understand your statement?
Which should I believe? Generations of experience and numeric specs
from every connector manufacturer? Or claims that were popular myths
even 40 years ago? Myths too routinely promoted by untrained techs
and not supported by even one fact.

Believe your own eyes. Your own experiences. If you have no experience
then ask for guidance from others who have. Get yourself a book on
general troubleshooting. It doesn't even have to be computer
troubleshooting. That will help more than any number of design spec
sheets. Keep a log of what you do when you repair something and check
that log when you do later repairs to see if there are any trends.
People who do this soon learn that what is most likely to be the cause
of a problem. They also learn that some things are easy (and cheap) to
do and have at least some chance of success. Why replace a card and/or
connector when reseating is cheap, easy and often works?
These 'reseat the connector' myths are proven with insults and
mockery.

Nothing is proven by insults and mockery.
Identifying symptoms of the least knowledgeable.

Again, nothing is proven by insults and mockery.
Basic engineering numbers mean a design works normally even under
worst case
connector conditions.

I'm not sure what you mean by "Basic engineering numbers" but I would
suggest to anyone to be very skeptical of anything you read. There are
good designs and bad. There are bad designs that use *cooked* specs to
make them look good.
Those with poorest training always know using only observation.

Of course observation is only *part* of learning but it is the most
important part when you are speaking about troubleshooting and repairing
computers.
Reseating connectors was always a first symptom of techs not likely
to make the cut.

If a company cuts techs who fix computers quickly and cheaply by
reseating and keeps techs who are so sure that reseating won't work that
they won't even try it then they are doing a great disservice to their
customers and themselves.

Charlie
 
C

Charlie

Mike Tomlinson said:
Par for the course from westom.


He won't, he'll just bullshit and wave his hands.

My statements and follow-up post were meant more for others reading this
group, especially someone new to the group who may think that reseating
a card has no value. I have done this before when someone makes
unsubstantiated statements that contradict what I have observed. I am
by no means an expert on fixing computers but I have fixed quite a few
by following logical troubleshooting procedures. My notes show me that
over the years there have been numerous times where reseating fixed the
problem permanently. I personally believe that it should be one of the
first things you should try when you encounter flakey hardware problems.
But I would say to anyone, don't believe me or westom, try it yourself.
It's easy, it's free and it just might work.

Charlie
 
M

Mike Tomlinson

Charlie said:
My statements and follow-up post were meant more for others reading this
group, especially someone new to the group who may think that reseating
a card has no value. I have done this before when someone makes
unsubstantiated statements that contradict what I have observed.

Quite. The problem with westom (aka w_tom, w_tom1) is that he has a
long-standing habit of doing this. He tags onto threads which relate to
power supplies, surge protection and PC repair (personally, I believe he
googles for them or has Google Alerts set) and adds his pennorth, which
is usually irrelevant to the OP's problem. He has been doing this for
many years; I'm unsure if you are aware of his previous history.

As you say, it's useful to correct his nonsense in case the unwary take
it at face value. He will never respond when challenged, but post more
hand-waving boilerplate which ignores any questions put to him.
I am
by no means an expert on fixing computers but I have fixed quite a few
by following logical troubleshooting procedures. My notes show me that
over the years there have been numerous times where reseating fixed the
problem permanently.

You and just about everyone else. We know that cards and motherboards
are built down to the absolute minimum price and that quality suffers,
so card edge connections/slot connectors won't be up to military or
industrial standards. westom's rambling about "standards" and "numbers"
and "specifications" over "generations" (what, they had PCI slots before
the war?) are just so much smoke-blowing.

You and I follow a logical sequence of events based on observation of
the symptoms, which hopefully will resolve the problem or identify a
faulty component.
I personally believe that it should be one of the
first things you should try when you encounter flakey hardware problems.

Yes, I absolutely agree.
 
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W

westom

I fail to see how manufacturer specifications prove anything. At least
in this context.

Then you have never worked as a designer. When selling on costs,
then specs get *forgotten*. Meanwhile what was posted was well proven
and routine even generations ago. Design of a connector is well
proven in its design history, and ... well if your logic was accurate,
then computers are routinely failing also due to resistor failures.
Resistors (like connectors) routinely meet well proven industry
standards. Then we design so that even least conductive connectors
cause no problems.

Well proven standards date back to knowledge numerous decades ago.
Any problem that is fixed by reseating a connection means the problem
remains unsolved. But that reality contradicts popular myths.

In another example (and I have too many to post), they kept
reseating connectors. And then the equipment would fail a week or a
month later. These 'most technically ignorant' even *knew* cleaning
contacts with an eraser fixed the problem - classic junk science
reasoning.

.. We traced failure to its source. In this case, a manufacturing
defect. Manufacturing used a connector designed for a heavier gauge
wire. Same price. Wrong connector. Technicians who routinely *knew
without first learning* would keep reseating connectors rather than
trace that problem to its source. And so the field was full of
defective electronics - because they kept fixing by reseating
connectors. Just another example of the naive blaming only what they
wanted to believe rather than solving a problem. Another example of
techs using classic 'junk science' reasoning. Reseating connectors to
*know* fixes something - only because that is a popular urban myth.

Another myths posted here: "you have bad power". If power was that
bad, then power damaged motorized appliances such as central air.
Power that varies so much as to be destructive to air conditioners or
refrigerators can be irrelevant to computers. Computers were required
to be that robust even before PCs existed. Naysayers will routinely
deny this. Naysayers are quick to blame the "usual suspects" rather
than first learn what actually causes problems. Many foolishly
believe reseating connectors is a solution - for the same reason they
also *knew* Saddam had WMDs. They just know. That popular myth is
sufficient proof.

Apparently Frustrated fixed his problem by first learning what could
actually cause problems. Then limiting solutions to what needed
upgrading. Fixing a problem by first learning what could actually
cause a failure. Ignoring popular myths such as reseating connectors
or cleaning them with an eraser. That popular connector myth exists
when fundamental electrical knowledge does not exist.

If reseating a connector fixes a failure, then the original problem
remains unsolved.
 
C

Charlie

Mike Tomlinson said:
Quite. The problem with westom (aka w_tom, w_tom1) is that he has a
long-standing habit of doing this. He tags onto threads which relate
to
power supplies, surge protection and PC repair (personally, I believe
he
googles for them or has Google Alerts set) and adds his pennorth,
which
is usually irrelevant to the OP's problem. He has been doing this for
many years; I'm unsure if you are aware of his previous history.

Yes I'm aware of his history, I've been lurking on this group for
several years (and sometimes post). I don't usually comment on westom's
often repeated views on surge suppressors and power supplies because
their are numerous others more qualified than I am to do that.

Charlie
 
C

Charlie

westom said:
Then you have never worked as a designer.

I have worked with and for designers usually on the "implementing the
design" end (not computer card connector design). I know quite well how
misleading written specifications are sometimes. I'm being kind in
saying misleading for some of them are downright lies to sell the
product. Anyway, the context I was referring to was your assertion
that:

"If reseating a card fixes it, then the card is 100% defective."

This is not so no matter how you look at it. I will grant that you
added:

"Any 'corrosion' that might form in a connector is made completely
irrelevant in design."

I'm still waiting for an explanation of that. Talk of design
specifications is not an explanation. Incidentally, corrosion is not
the only reason a card connection may need to be reseated.
When selling on costs, then specs get *forgotten*.

Exactly, so why do you put so much faith in specs. You must also keep
in mind that the context of this discussion is troubleshooting and
hopefully repairing a person's computer. Not whether or not someone's
design specification says that the connection will always remain
perfect.
... well if your logic was accurate,
then computers are routinely failing also due to resistor failures.
Resistors (like connectors) routinely meet well proven industry
standards.

Analogies are fun but they're rarely very useful. They tend to confuse
things. Yours succeeds admirably if confusion was what you intended.
Then we design so that even least conductive connectors
cause no problems.

Ah, perfection. I love those kinds of designs :)
Well proven standards date back to knowledge numerous decades ago.

Now you switch from design specs to standards. Are you speaking of
standards generated by committee or the de facto standard we see in
personal computers. Try to remember that this is newsgroup for
homebuilt PC hardware and the original poster was seeking information
about a problem with his PC.
Any problem that is fixed by reseating a connection means the problem
remains unsolved. But that reality contradicts popular myths.

You said that before. I disagree.
In another example (and I have too many to post), they kept
reseating connectors. And then the equipment would fail a week or a
month later.

I certainly agree that reseating is not going to cure all or even most
computer problems.
These 'most technically ignorant' even *knew* cleaning
contacts with an eraser fixed the problem - classic junk science
reasoning.

We are not talking about science here. We are talking about proper
troubleshooting/repair techniques. Well at least I am.
We traced failure to its source. In this case, a manufacturing
defect. Manufacturing used a connector designed for a heavier gauge
wire. Same price. Wrong connector. Technicians who routinely *knew
without first learning* would keep reseating connectors rather than
trace that problem to its source. And so the field was full of
defective electronics - because they kept fixing by reseating
connectors. Just another example of the naive blaming only what they
wanted to believe rather than solving a problem. Another example of
techs using classic 'junk science' reasoning. Reseating connectors to
*know* fixes something - only because that is a popular urban myth.

But don't you see. Your story above is the perfect example of how
reseating helped find the problem. It narrowed down the search to the
connector area. If they had used your "read the specs and standards"
method they would have spent huge amounts of time with the design
decisions of the capacitors, resistors, case air flow, hard drive
bearings, affects of cosmic rays on memory chips, etc. etc. And guess
what, even if you did learn all there was to know you would still have
to find out if these specs/standards were adhered to. In other words
test everything. This may make sense to you but not to me.

If reseating a connector fixes a failure, then the original problem
remains unsolved.

Your logic speaks for itself.

Charlie
 
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W

westom

But don't you see. Your story above is the perfect example of how
reseating helped find the problem. It narrowed down the search to the
connector area.

It cost the company maybe $200,000 because the first and every tech
afterwards used a classic myth - reseating connectors - top ignore the
problem. Ignored the problem so long that the junk science created a
$200,000 expense.

Those techs did what many ill trained techs so often do. They
changed things until something worked. They did not find the problem
before fixing it. And they assumed connectors can be fixed by
cleaning or reseating - which only happens when the defect is
elsewhere. IOW they 'fixed symptoms' rather than 'solve the problem'.

You don't grasp the concept. Fixing things comes directly from
concepts taught in junior high science. To have a solution means both
experimental evidence AND fundamental underlying theory. Without
both, that is classic junk science.

In this case, experimental evidence is 'reseating eliminates a
failure'. Specs state that anything that 'reseating' would do must
never happen - in decades. Therefore both requirements for 'solving'
anything did not exist. If reseating fixes something, then electrical
reasons for why must also be explained. Reseating a connector means a
gross design failure or a defect located elsewhere. Reseating is
'curing symptoms'; not solving problems.

If reseating a connector solved that problem, then an integrated
circuit may be defective and getting worse with age. The tech simply
ignored the problem. Often because most techs do not even understand
the electrical concepts of IC operation.

Untrained techs rarely grasp it. That concept is what engineers
must teach their techs. Fixing something by 'reseating' is a classic
junk science solution. A tech that fixes something and does not know
why: well that is why Consumer magazines created trivial problems,
took their machines to certified computer techs, and rarely got the
problem solved. 'Reseating' solutions are common among computer techs
who do not even know how electricity works.

Why? A+ Certified computer techs need no electrical knowledge to
pass the test.

If 'reseating' eliminates a failure, then a problem still exists (is
unsolved). Those techs used junk science reasoning to keep
'reseating'. Therefore all products went out the door with the same
unsolved defect. One with contempt for junk science stumbled on a
$200,000 mistake. A $200,000 mistake because techs were using classic
junk science - 'reseating connectors'. Failure disappeared. But the
problem remained. They violated principles even taught in junior
high science. They cured symptoms; did not solve problems.

Because they kept solving the problem by reseating connectors, then
they created a $200,000 loss. Fixing a computer by reseating
connectors is classic junk science - means the problem remains
undetected and unsolved. An overwhelming majority of computer techs
would cure failures by only reseating or cleaning connector contacts.

Why does reseating temporarily cure a symptom? All connectors are
self-cleaning - as even defined in specifications. If cleaning
contacts eliminates a failure, then problem remains unsolved. Number
one problem - a tech who forgot why those lessons in junior high
science apply - a tech that practices junk science. Reseating
connectors only cures symptoms; does not solve the problem.
 

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