I need your advice - new build: fans and lights, "no signal", nopost beep


T

ToolPackinMama

* ABIT AX78 AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD Motherboard
* AMD Phenom 8450 Toliman 2.1GHz Socket AM2+ 95W Triple-Core Processor
Model HD8450WCGHBOX - Retail
* BFG Tech BFGE88512GTSE GeForce 8800GTS (G92) 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI
Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card
* Patriot Extreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066
(PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
* Seagate Barracuda ES.2 ST3250310NS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive
* Antec Earthwatts 500 PSU
* DVD-WR
* FDD

(USB KB and mouse.)

I try to boot and all fans and lights come on. Post code on MB is "FF",
which as far as I know means fully functional. Monitor says "No
signal". No post beep, no drives responding.

I have tried reseating the RAM, and the video card. I have tried
substituting an old ATI PCI-E video card. The CRT monitor is known to
be good and is connected properly.

What should I be looking at here?
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Doe

ToolPackinMama said:
Monitor says "No signal". No post beep, no drives responding.

I have tried reseating the RAM, and the video card. I have tried
substituting an old ATI PCI-E video card. The CRT monitor is
known to be good and is connected properly.

What should I be looking at here?

Is there a BIOS setting for initializing monitor types (like the old
PCI/AGP)?

The monitor cable?
 
D

Dave

ToolPackinMama said:
* ABIT AX78 AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD Motherboard
* AMD Phenom 8450 Toliman 2.1GHz Socket AM2+ 95W Triple-Core Processor
Model HD8450WCGHBOX - Retail
* BFG Tech BFGE88512GTSE GeForce 8800GTS (G92) 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI
Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card
* Patriot Extreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066
(PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
* Seagate Barracuda ES.2 ST3250310NS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard
Drive
* Antec Earthwatts 500 PSU
* DVD-WR
* FDD

(USB KB and mouse.)

I try to boot and all fans and lights come on. Post code on MB is "FF",
which as far as I know means fully functional. Monitor says "No signal".
No post beep, no drives responding.

I have tried reseating the RAM, and the video card. I have tried
substituting an old ATI PCI-E video card. The CRT monitor is known to be
good and is connected properly.

What should I be looking at here?

Bad power supply, bad motherboard, or bad CPU or improperly installed CPU.
In that specific order.

Fans and lights will come on when the power supply is active. But to boot,
several things need to happen after that point. Power supply needs to send
power ok to CPU through mainboard. CPU then needs to start POST, from
mainboard BIOS. If initial POST passes OK, then video card is initialized.
Then you start getting video and POST continues. If POST finishes with no
errors, your CPU looks for an operating system, usually from the optical
drive or hard drive (whatever the boot sequence is in BIOS setup menus)

No POST beep would mean that POST is not running, or your mainboard speaker
is disconnected. Did you hook up a speaker? Does your mainboard have a
built-in speaker?

Stupid question but...is your FDD light stuck on? If so, disconnect your
floppy drive (both cables) then try to boot again.

But with JUST the information you posted so far, I'd say bad power supply,
or you missed a connection between mainboard and power supply. There should
be two connections between power supply and mainboard. Not knowing that
specific mainboard, I'm GUESSING you need a 24-pin connection AND an 8-pin
connection to the mainboard from the power supply. -Dave
 
J

John Doe

Dave said:
Is there a jumper for that? He's not getting to the BIOS setup
screens with no video.

No she isn't... good point.
I guess that also rules out trying to flash the BIOS.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

ToolPackinMama

Dave said:
But with JUST the information you posted so far, I'd say bad power
supply,

New power supply

or you missed a connection between mainboard and power supply.

Nope
There should be two connections between power supply and mainboard. Not
knowing that specific mainboard, I'm GUESSING you need a 24-pin
connection AND an 8-pin connection to the mainboard from the power
supply.

Yes and both are properly connected
 
M

Mike Tomlinson

ToolPackinMama said:
I try to boot and all fans and lights come on. Post code on MB is "FF",
which as far as I know means fully functional.

Does this go through a sequence of other numbers before reaching FF? If
not (it goes straight to FF and stays there as soon as you power up),
the CPU is not running.

Possibilities: pretty much anything. Take the machine down to bare
bones (mobo, cpu, one video card, one memory stick). If it still won't
boot, take the memory out and power up - does it beep? If not, CPU or
mobo are faulty.

One last thought - the "clear CMOS" jumper isn't in the clear position?
 
P

Paul

ToolPackinMama said:
No video. No workee.

Is the ATX12V 2x2 power connector installed ? In section 1.6 of
the manual, there is a picture of how a 2x2 should look, when plugged
into the 2x4. Verify your yellow wires (+12V) are oriented the
same way as the picture in the manual. (I'm using the downloadable
manual from the web site.)

You cannot get a POST beep unless the processor is powered.

Also, the PCI Port 80 POST display (two digit display), will rest
at 0xFF or 0x00 at powerup (hardware-wise, it has to have
some known initial value). If the processor is not functional,
the code will stay at that value. So rather than "FF" meaning
Fully Functional, it means Function Frozen :)

In the distant past, when an couple models of Antec supply,
were connected to a number of different Asus motherboards,
the Vcore regulator would shut down, due to a timing problem.
I didn't get a full explanation at the time, as to what
the exact reason was. But it almost seemed the Vcore was
shutting down on overcurrent, because it was taking so long
for the 12V rail to reach full voltage. So that is another
failure mechanism, only with no feedback other than that a
different brand of ATX supply would work OK.

There is also a small possibility of a bad processor. In
which case, swapping something like a Sempron or other
lightweight substitute, might identify what is broken.

Pulling the RAM, may give the BIOS a chance to start. I think
I've had one motherboard that was silenced, by a stick of
RAM that was bad below 640K. You'd get a beep code
with no RAM present, and the POST display may advance past 0xFF.
That tells you the processor is running.

In the reviews here, someone installed a 9850 and the board
worked OK. Someone else installed an X2 6400+ and the Vcore
regulator went up in smoke (see ref to "PWM"). There was an
article on Anandtech, where they ruined a few AM2 boards before
figuring out the boards were limited to 95W processors. There
is no CPU Support chart that I could find on the Abit site,
so no way to see what the manufacturer claims. The short form
spec on the Abit site suggests the board takes Phenoms, but
whether it takes the top end ones, is something you normally
resolve by looking at their detailed "tested" list.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...&SelectedRating=-1&VideoOnlyMark=False&Page=1

(There is a manual link on this page.)
http://www.abit.com.tw/page/en/motherboard/motherboard_detail.php?pMODEL_NAME=AX78&fMTYPE=Socket AM2

ftp://ftp.abit.com.tw/pub/download//manual/english/ax78_v100.zip

After that nasty incident, Asus responded by boasting about
the newer boards they made, rated at 140W. Since many
manufacturers made substandard boards in the same "wave"
of product releases, I have to conclude AMD told them to
do it (make lightweight Vcore regulators). Later
boards corrected this stupid idea. This is Asus cleaning
up their act.

http://event.asus.com/mb/140w/

When you find an AM2+ board, with 4 phases, the actual phase
configuration is 3+1. On an AM2+, like a Phenom, the core
is powered by three phases, and the memory controller interface is
powered by the remaining phase. It means effectively, that
most of the power is coming from three phases, which is why
these things can fry. (Yes, there is a regulator next to the RAM,
but that powers the RAM sticks. The memory controller on the
processor, has its own supply, and the phase is located
in the Vcore area on the motherboard.)

http://c1.neweggimages.com/NeweggImage/productimage/13-127-046-05.jpg

As far as i know, Abit (UAbit) is stopping motherboard production
at the end of the calendar year. Based on the comments in that
Newegg listing, parts of the company were already broken
(poor tech support, no rebate delivered). So the writing is
on the wall. You could well be looking at the purchase of
another board, if it turns out to be a motherboard problem.
UAbit will still be around, just not making motherboards.
While there is a promise of warranty support for three years,
if you cannot get through to them, that would be hard to arrange
(some companies do stuff like that, "pull a paper bag over their
heads" so they cannot hear from users).

http://channel.hexus.net/content/item.php?item=15225

Good luck,
Paul
 
D

Dave

ToolPackinMama said:
New power supply

DOA? Pretty common, unfortunately. I wouldn't rule out the power supply
until you try a different one that is "known good", and at least 500W, with
the proper connectors (no adapter required).

I'm still leaning toward the power supply. Next suspect would be the
mainboard. But power supply is more likely. -Dave
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

Dave

Possibilities: pretty much anything. Take the machine down to bare
bones (mobo, cpu, one video card, one memory stick). If it still won't
boot, take the memory out and power up - does it beep? If not, CPU or
mobo are faulty.

Or power supply is bad. (more likely)

One last thought - the "clear CMOS" jumper isn't in the clear position?

Good one. -Dave
 
M

Matt

ToolPackinMama said:
* ABIT AX78 AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD Motherboard
* AMD Phenom 8450 Toliman 2.1GHz Socket AM2+ 95W Triple-Core Processor
Model HD8450WCGHBOX - Retail
* BFG Tech BFGE88512GTSE GeForce 8800GTS (G92) 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI
Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card
* Patriot Extreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066
(PC2 8500) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory
* Seagate Barracuda ES.2 ST3250310NS 250GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive
* Antec Earthwatts 500 PSU
* DVD-WR
* FDD

(USB KB and mouse.)

I try to boot and all fans and lights come on. Post code on MB is "FF",
which as far as I know means fully functional. Monitor says "No
signal". No post beep, no drives responding.


May be a dumb question, but how are you getting this "FF" code if the
monitor is not getting a signal and you are getting no beeps?
 
D

Dave

May be a dumb question, but how are you getting this "FF" code if the
monitor is not getting a signal and you are getting no beeps?

LED POST display indicator mounted on motherboard. If motherboard has
power, the display should show something. Doesn't mean the motherboard is
good. -Dave
 
M

Matt

Dave said:
LED POST display indicator mounted on motherboard. If motherboard has
power, the display should show something. Doesn't mean the motherboard
is good. -Dave


Ah, thanks. That doesn't seem to be common on the motherboards I've
considered lately. Maybe it's some kind of add on.

BTW, thanks for the lead on the GA-EP45-UD3R motherboard. Guessing from
the number and positiveness of its newegg reviews in the past two weeks,
it is going to be a best seller.
 
Ad

Advertisements

W

westom1

New power supply

Does not matter. It is a power supply 'system' - not just a power
supply. Whereas people such as Paul provided useful information,
still, until you establish the integrity of that power supply
'system', everything else is wasted effort.

Fans can spin and lights light - and the supply 'system' can still
be completely defective. Only way to know is a 3.5 digit multimeter
(or else $thousands in other test equipment). In your case, the most
important numbers from a less than 2 minute procedure are on any one
purple, red, orange, and yellow wires from the power supply. These
numbers must exceed 3.23, 4.87, and 11.7. Posting those numbers here
may result in further useful information.

Do you want more 'it could be this or could be that' answers?
Useful answers would say ‘this is the problem' or 'that is completely
good; move on to other suspects. After all this, you still do not
even know what is good. That means no useful labor has been
performed.

Even 'new' says nothing about your existing supply. A supply that
works in one system can be defective in another. Worse, a defective
supply can also boot a computer. It is a 'system' - not just the
supply. Above is how to make progress and get the knowledgeable to
provide more useful replies. Until the supply system is known
'definitively good', then testing and diagnosising other parts is
complicated or futile. Verify a power 'system' integrity before
moving on to other suspects. Currently, you don't know of anything
that is defintively good. By now, you should have some items on that
list to have accomplished anything. Get the meter.
 
D

Dave

New power supply
Does not matter. It is a power supply 'system' - not just a power
supply. Whereas people such as Paul provided useful information,
still, until you establish the integrity of that power supply
'system', everything else is wasted effort.
Fans can spin and lights light - and the supply 'system' can still
be completely defective. Only way to know is a 3.5 digit multimeter
(or else $thousands in other test equipment). In your case, the most
important numbers from a less than 2 minute procedure are on any one
purple, red, orange, and yellow wires from the power supply. These
numbers must exceed 3.23, 4.87, and 11.7. Posting those numbers here
may result in further useful information.


Just keep in mind (and this is why I advise people NOT to test with a
multimeter/voltmeter) that 90% or more of DEFECTIVE power supplies will test
GOOD with a multimeter. That's because a (GOOD!) power supply doesn't just
provide stable DC voltage for a fraction of a second...or a few seconds, or
even a few MINUTES. So any reading you take with a multimeter will only
tell you that the power supply is not dead. Which is something the OP
already knows. That is, the OP already knows that the power supply isn't
totally dead. But the OP doesn't know that the power supply is good. And,
if the OP checks the outputs of the power supply with a multimeter, then the
OP can NOT conclude (based on the readings on the multimeter) that the power
supply is good.

Without buying thousands of dollars of test equipment (referenced earlier),
the best way to test a suspect power supply is to replace it with a known
good power supply. Using a multimeter before swapping the power supply is
like driving from San Diego to Las Vegas by way of Dallas. You likely won't
learn anything, and you are wasting time. -Dave
 
T

ToolPackinMama

Mike said:
Does this go through a sequence of other numbers before reaching FF? If
not (it goes straight to FF and stays there as soon as you power up),
the CPU is not running.

OK I did install the CPU double triple extra carefully, because I don't
ever want to be guilty of not seating/installing it properly. I used
the included heatsink/fan which comes with heatsink goo already on it.

The CPU was firmly, properly in place and latched down... I CHECKED, I'M
VERY CAREFUL...the heatsink/fan installed without any complications.

Later, after I read some comments here, I pulled the machine apart and
when I went to lift the heatsink off, the CPU came with it. It came
away easily, I wasn't violent. Stuck fast together - and the ZIF latch
is still down in locked position.

I thought "Oh! That can't be good!"
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

ToolPackinMama

Paul said:
Is the ATX12V 2x2 power connector installed ? In section 1.6 of
the manual, there is a picture of how a 2x2 should look, when plugged
into the 2x4. Verify your yellow wires (+12V) are oriented the
same way as the picture in the manual. (I'm using the downloadable
manual from the web site.)

You cannot get a POST beep unless the processor is powered.

OK, I thought not. That is all very helpful.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top