Cross over cable


G

Guest

I wil be getting broadband shortley and would like to network my two home
PCs together using a crossover cable. I no this is not the best way to share
internet connection but cannot afford to get router just yet, can anyone tell
me what problems I might have when setting this up. One PC has Windows XP
(this one willhave the modem connected to it) and the other PC in Windows
Media Center 2004
 
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L

Linda Callard

Tony said:
I wil be getting broadband shortley and would like to network my two home
PCs together using a crossover cable. I no this is not the best way to
share
internet connection but cannot afford to get router just yet, can anyone
tell
me what problems I might have when setting this up. One PC has Windows XP
(this one willhave the modem connected to it) and the other PC in Windows
Media Center 2004
Our experience with a crossover cable when we first networked was very
positive. No problems at all. You might consider getting a crimping tool
and making your own. In the long run, with the various cables that you will
require, it will work out to be cheaper. With respect to the router, they
always seem to be on sale at Best Buy, Future Shop, and Radio Shack. We
bought a D-Link for C$20 (after rebates) that has served us very well.
Routers do not have to be expensive, and they add an extra measure of
protection with broadband. If you can, get the router now.
 
G

Guest

Thanks Linda, I have actually alreadynetworked the two PC's together using
the crossover cable and can access each PC, my concern was(based on what
other people have told me) would internet access be ok. I had been told that
acees over crossovert cable is a lot slower.
 
C

Chuck

Our experience with a crossover cable when we first networked was very
positive. No problems at all. You might consider getting a crimping tool
and making your own. In the long run, with the various cables that you will
require, it will work out to be cheaper. With respect to the router, they
always seem to be on sale at Best Buy, Future Shop, and Radio Shack. We
bought a D-Link for C$20 (after rebates) that has served us very well.
Routers do not have to be expensive, and they add an extra measure of
protection with broadband. If you can, get the router now.
Linda,

With all due respect, making your own cable is not good advice. The cost of a
quality crimping tool far exceeds the savings you might make by buying bulk
cable, if you're making just one cable. A pre made, certified, Ethernet cable
is almost always the better buy in the long run. There are far too many ways to
screw up when making a cable - and the time involved in identifying a problem
caused by a bad cable can be frustrating.

Even in cases where you do save money by making your own cables, I'd advise
having at least two pre made, certified, cables available for diagnosing
connectivity issues.

You are right about the router issue though. If you can afford to have two
computers, you can afford to buy a router to connect them. The only case, where
a router is not a good purchase, is where your internet service will not work
with a router, such as non PPP compatible dialup, or an ISP Provided USB modem.
 
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C

Chuck

Thanks Linda, I have actually alreadynetworked the two PC's together using
the crossover cable and can access each PC, my concern was(based on what
other people have told me) would internet access be ok. I had been told that
acees over crossovert cable is a lot slower.
Tony,

Internet access shared using a cross-over cable won't necessarily be slower, by
itself. Most LAN cables are capable of 100M bits / second traffic; internet
service (from your ISP) has a long way to go to where LAN speeds will be a
factor here.

However, the disadvantages of using a software solution (such as ICS) to share
internet service (with or without a cross-over cable) include resource
utilisation problems, which can be similar in effect to slower LAN speed.

To expand upon that, the advantages of using a router to share internet service:
1) Convenience: When you use ICS to share internet service, the ICS server
will have to be online when you need to access the internet from an ICS client.
With a NAT router, you can turn off any computer without affecting internet
service to the other computers.
2) Resource Utilisation: The current level of trash "hostile" traffic from
infected computers will tax the network, and the processor, when not filtered by
a NAT router.
3) Security: Filtering hostile traffic with a NAT router is far preferable to
allowing hostile traffic to reach your computer, and filtering it there.
 

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