Boot selector


J

JIMMIE

I would like to be able to select which hard drive I boot from with
out going into BIOS. I have a key switch I can install on the computer
that would allow me to change the jumper connections on the drives for
master /slave. The roles of both drives would be change with the
position of the switch. Would this work?

Jimmie
 
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J

Jan Alter

JIMMIE said:
I would like to be able to select which hard drive I boot from with
out going into BIOS. I have a key switch I can install on the computer
that would allow me to change the jumper connections on the drives for
master /slave. The roles of both drives would be change with the
position of the switch. Would this work?

Jimmie

I think it would. I have done it using a removable hard drive caddy. Setting
up the bios to to look for the caddy drive first and then second the
internal drive worked. With the computer off I would use the key to turn it
on and then press the power button of the computer. The bios was set to look
for the caddy removeable hard drive first and the internal drive second so
it would start from the removeable drive. When I wanted to start from the
internal drive I would shut off the computer turn the key off and then
restart the computer. Now it would start from the internal drive. The only
problem with this set up is that one would not have access to the removeable
drive (since the power was off) when starting the system from the internal
drive using the key on/off method. Using the bios to control this gives one
the versatility to access both. It is not a good idea using IDE drives to
even consider turning on the key of the removeable caddy after the machine
is running.
There are software boot menus than can easily be installed to allow you
selection of hard drives instead of resetting the bios each time. Can't
think of their names but I used to use them as well. Try googling or wait
and someone will supply you with those options.
 
P

Peter

(e-mail address removed)>, (e-mail address removed)
says...
I would like to be able to select which hard drive I boot from with
out going into BIOS. I have a key switch I can install on the computer
that would allow me to change the jumper connections on the drives for
master /slave. The roles of both drives would be change with the
position of the switch. Would this work?

Jimmie

What motherboard do you have? Yours may allow you to do this anyway,
just by pressing the appropriate key when the computer starts a boot
option menu can often be selected allowing you to select which device to
boot from, be that USB, CD/DVD or any HD that is attached.
 
J

JIMMIE

I think it would. I have done it using a removable hard drive caddy. Setting
up the bios to to look for the caddy drive first and then second the
internal drive worked. With the computer off I would use the key to turn it
on and then press the power button of the computer. The bios was set to look
for the caddy removeable hard drive first  and the internal drive second so
it would start from the removeable drive. When I wanted to start from the
internal drive I would shut off the computer turn the key off and then
restart the computer. Now it would start from the internal drive. The only
problem with this set up is that one would not have access to the removeable
drive (since the power was off) when starting the system from the internal
drive using the key on/off method. Using the bios to control this gives one
the versatility to access both. It is not a good idea using IDE drives to
even consider turning on the key of the removeable caddy after the machine
is running.
   There are software boot menus than can easily be installed to allow you
selection of hard drives instead of resetting the bios each time. Can't
think of their names but I used to use them as well. Try googling or wait
and someone will supply you with those options.

Jan I tested unpluging powe r from the primary drive and it did boot
from the alternate drive. In this case the D: drive. This is too cool
windows doesnt even care that it was installed twice. Now I dont have
to worry about finding that my daughter has installed 5 tool bars on
my computer. She can trash her harddrive and I dont care. IF hers get
bad enough off I can just reformat and reinstall
the operating system.

Jimmie
 
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J

Jan Alter

I think it would. I have done it using a removable hard drive caddy.
Setting
up the bios to to look for the caddy drive first and then second the
internal drive worked. With the computer off I would use the key to turn
it
on and then press the power button of the computer. The bios was set to
look
for the caddy removeable hard drive first and the internal drive second so
it would start from the removeable drive. When I wanted to start from the
internal drive I would shut off the computer turn the key off and then
restart the computer. Now it would start from the internal drive. The only
problem with this set up is that one would not have access to the
removeable
drive (since the power was off) when starting the system from the internal
drive using the key on/off method. Using the bios to control this gives
one
the versatility to access both. It is not a good idea using IDE drives to
even consider turning on the key of the removeable caddy after the machine
is running.
There are software boot menus than can easily be installed to allow you
selection of hard drives instead of resetting the bios each time. Can't
think of their names but I used to use them as well. Try googling or wait
and someone will supply you with those options.

Jan I tested unpluging powe r from the primary drive and it did boot
from the alternate drive. In this case the D: drive. This is too cool
windows doesnt even care that it was installed twice. Now I dont have
to worry about finding that my daughter has installed 5 tool bars on
my computer. She can trash her harddrive and I dont care. IF hers get
bad enough off I can just reformat and reinstall
the operating system.

Jimmie


Well I guess it's a Happy New Year.
 

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