Bolding, Italics, Underlines


P

PSULionRP

I hope I explain this correctly. When I am bolding and italicizing some
words, when I get to the end, I try turning off bolding, <CTRL><B>, and
Italicizing, <CTRL><I>, and it takes off the bolding and italicizing off of
the last word. This also happens if I want to finish the sentence with a
straight period.

Is there any easy way to do this without having to go back over the last
word, highlight it, and Select Bold and Italics???

Just a pain is all when I want to turn it off. More of a pain when I'm
finishing a sentence and I want a straight period without it being bolded,
italicized, or underlined.

Like I said, I hope I explained this ok.

Thanks in advance for your review and hopeful for a reply.

PSULionRP
 
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S

Stefan Blom

You can clear direct font formatting by pressing Ctrl+SpaceBar. Note,
however, that this clears all direct font formatting, such as font name and
size, and restores the settings of the underlying paragraph style.
 
D

DeanH

You can use Find/Replace. If the words are both Italic and Bold, do the
following:
Find What: leave empty, but press Ctrl+B and Ctrl+I, you will see Font:
Bold, Italic appear beneath the Find box.
Replace with: leave empty, but press Ctrl+B - twice, Ctrl+I - twice, you
will see Font: Not Bold, Not Italic
Now Find Next and Replace as required.
If the words have only one format applied, do Bold, Italic, Underline
separately.
Ctrl+U for underline will work in the same way.
Hope this helps
DeanH
 
P

Peter T. Daniels

I think the problem is happening because you have "Smart Word
Selection" (or something like that) turned on in your Options. (Which
version of Word?) It thinks the following punctuation is part of the
word, and we don't want that!

If you need to keep that turned on for convenience in selecting words,
then you should be able to de-bold, etc., the period if you select it
as an individual character and then use the keyboard commands or the
mouse to remove the formatting.

If you happen to have Chinese enabled on your computer, Ctrl-Spacebar
will switch you to Chinese (and this can't be overridden in Windows!).
So use Ctrl-Shift-Z to remove all manual character formatting.
 
P

PSULionRP

Thanks Stefan. That worked but my nervous twitch is going here based on your
"however". Once I hit <CTRL><SPACEBAR> it allowed me to <CTRL><B> without
losing it on the last word and allowed me to continue typing with no
formatting, bold, italics, underline, and kept my formatting, specifically my
font.

I'm just a little nervous by hitting <CTRL><SAPCEBAR> if it's going to mess
things up when I print because otherwise the document looks fine.

Could you maybe explain your "however" in a little more detail???
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

There's also an option, "When selecting, automatically select entire word,"
that can drive you to distraction (and quite possibly cause this problem).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

I think the problem is happening because you have "Smart Word
Selection" (or something like that) turned on in your Options. (Which
version of Word?) It thinks the following punctuation is part of the
word, and we don't want that!

If you need to keep that turned on for convenience in selecting words,
then you should be able to de-bold, etc., the period if you select it
as an individual character and then use the keyboard commands or the
mouse to remove the formatting.

If you happen to have Chinese enabled on your computer, Ctrl-Spacebar
will switch you to Chinese (and this can't be overridden in Windows!).
So use Ctrl-Shift-Z to remove all manual character formatting.
 
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S

Stefan Blom

Direct formatting is formatting applied directly to text, for example when
you format text by selecting it and choosing a font, a font style, etc. for
the selection, as opposed to applying a style.

Direct formatting is OK, of course, if you want to make text bold, italic,
or underline. But changes that should be "global" (such as font changes for
an entire document) is best done by modifying the style.

In Word 2007, you can do the following to change the default font of a
document: Press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S to display the Styles pane. Click the
Manage Styles button. On the Set Defaults tab, specify the desired settings.
If you want to transfer the modifications to the attached document, be sure
to select "New documents based on this template" before clicking OK.
 
S

Stefan Blom

Stefan Blom said:
Direct formatting is formatting applied directly to text, for example when
you format text by selecting it and choosing a font, a font style, etc.
for
the selection, as opposed to applying a style.

Direct formatting is OK, of course, if you want to make text bold, italic,
or underline. But changes that should be "global" (such as font changes
for an entire document) is best done by modifying the style.

Clarification: In Word 2007, those global changes can be done by changing
the default font for the document (or template), as described below. In
earlier versions, you would always modify the Normal style, though.

In Word 2007, you can do the following to change the default font of a
document: Press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S to display the Styles pane. Click the
Manage Styles button. On the Set Defaults tab, specify the desired
settings. If you want to transfer the modifications to the attached
document, be sure to select "New documents based on this template" before
clicking OK.


--
Stefan Blom
Microsoft Word MVP
 
P

Peter T. Daniels

That's what I mean -- maybe it's one of the myriad things that were
pointlessly renamed in W2007.

I once found a page in Help that explained what each of those
peculiarly named Word Options does -- except they didn't bother to do
it for the important ones, the ones hidden under "layout" at the
bottom.
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

You can find a summary of the functions of the Compatibility Options for
Word 2002/2003 (which will cover most of them) at
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=288792. Some of the explanations, though,
are not terribly helpful.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

That's what I mean -- maybe it's one of the myriad things that were
pointlessly renamed in W2007.

I once found a page in Help that explained what each of those
peculiarly named Word Options does -- except they didn't bother to do
it for the important ones, the ones hidden under "layout" at the
bottom.
 
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P

Peter T. Daniels

It wasn't updated for Word2007, so in a few months it'll be even less
useful?

As Seth Myers might say, Repeating the name of an option as an
explanation of that option is not all that helpful Really, Microsoft.
 
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