Basic nameserver setup WIN2003


B

Ben

Hi Guys,

I've hosting my company websites on a dedicated server for the last couple
of years, with the DNS being managed by our ISP. I want to move the primary
DNS in house, and have been reading up on this, but I'm now more confused
than when I started. I will ist what I have done so far and hopefully
someone can let me know if what I have done is correct:

1. I have registered a new domain (newdomain.com) for this purpose and have
set up nameservers with the registrar (ns1.newdomain.com with the static IP
of our server).

2. The internal computer name has always remained as what the isp set up
(p3-01982), and our default website has always been accessabily at
http://p3-01982.myisp.com. I have changed the computer name to "ns1" and the
primary DNS suffix to "newdomain.com".

3. In the DNS manager I have created a new forward lookup zone for
"newdomain.com". It has been given 3 default records by the wizard:
Name Type Data
(same as parent folder) SOA [1],
ns1.newdomain.com.,hostmaster.newdomain.com
(same as parent folder) NS ns1.newdomain.com
ns1 A ip.ad.dr.ess

4. I have added another record which was intended to allocate newdomain.com
to the default website:
www A ip.ad.dr.ess

when doing this I got an error message saying the PTR cannot be found.

5. I have setup host headers in IIS for the default site for the domains
newdomain.com and www.newdomain.com

This is as far as I've got. Have I done anything wrong so far ? I have some
more questions:

6. The server can now be accessed through both ns1.newdomain.com and the isp
domain, will this always be the case ? Is there any way I can stop access
through the ISP domain or will they have that permantly setup on their
servers ?

7. Does the computer name have to match the name of the nameserver ?

8. The default site is accessiblie at http://www.newdomain.com but not
http://newdomain.com ? The host headers are setup so am I missing a DNS
record

9. Do I need a CNAME record ?

Thanks very much for any advice anyone can give.

Regards
Ben

P.S. Please reply to group so everyone can get the benefit of your reply.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

Jeff Cochran

Hi Guys,

I've hosting my company websites on a dedicated server for the last couple
of years, with the DNS being managed by our ISP. I want to move the primary
DNS in house, and have been reading up on this, but I'm now more confused
than when I started. I will ist what I have done so far and hopefully
someone can let me know if what I have done is correct:

1. I have registered a new domain (newdomain.com) for this purpose and have
set up nameservers with the registrar (ns1.newdomain.com with the static IP
of our server).

2. The internal computer name has always remained as what the isp set up
(p3-01982), and our default website has always been accessabily at
http://p3-01982.myisp.com. I have changed the computer name to "ns1" and the
primary DNS suffix to "newdomain.com".

3. In the DNS manager I have created a new forward lookup zone for
"newdomain.com". It has been given 3 default records by the wizard:
Name Type Data
(same as parent folder) SOA [1],
ns1.newdomain.com.,hostmaster.newdomain.com
(same as parent folder) NS ns1.newdomain.com
ns1 A ip.ad.dr.ess

4. I have added another record which was intended to allocate newdomain.com
to the default website:
www A ip.ad.dr.ess

when doing this I got an error message saying the PTR cannot be found.

5. I have setup host headers in IIS for the default site for the domains
newdomain.com and www.newdomain.com

This is as far as I've got. Have I done anything wrong so far ?

I wouldn't have changed the system name, but it's not necessarily
wrong.
I have some
more questions:

6. The server can now be accessed through both ns1.newdomain.com and the isp
domain, will this always be the case ? Is there any way I can stop access
through the ISP domain or will they have that permantly setup on their
servers ?

It will work that way until they remove the record in their DNS.
Which they may or may not do if they host the system for you.
7. Does the computer name have to match the name of the nameserver ?
No.

8. The default site is accessiblie at http://www.newdomain.com but not
http://newdomain.com ? The host headers are setup so am I missing a DNS
record

You need a blank host for the domain pointing to your web server's IP.
9. Do I need a CNAME record ?

No. CNAME records are for convenience and management, and it's
permissible to use plain old A records. In general, if you had five
different names you wanted your server known by, you might use an A
record for one name and CNAME alias the rest to that first name. Then
you only need to update the IP for that first record if the IP
changes.

Jeff
 
B

Ben

Ben said:
Hi Guys,

I've hosting my company websites on a dedicated server for the last couple
of years, with the DNS being managed by our ISP. I want to move the primary
DNS in house, and have been reading up on this, but I'm now more confused
than when I started. I will ist what I have done so far and hopefully
someone can let me know if what I have done is correct:

<snip>

I realise my post was quite long, but any advice for even just one or two
questions would be very appreciated.

Ben
 
K

Kevin D. Goodknecht [MVP]

In Ben <[email protected]> posted a question
Then Kevin replied below:
:
: I realise my post was quite long, but any advice for even just one or
: two questions would be very appreciated.
:
: Ben
Jeff Cochran answered your post here is a cut of his post if you have any
further questions let us know.
Hi Guys,

I've hosting my company websites on a dedicated server for the last couple
of years, with the DNS being managed by our ISP. I want to move the primary
DNS in house, and have been reading up on this, but I'm now more confused
than when I started. I will ist what I have done so far and hopefully
someone can let me know if what I have done is correct:

1. I have registered a new domain (newdomain.com) for this purpose and have
set up nameservers with the registrar (ns1.newdomain.com with the static IP
of our server).

2. The internal computer name has always remained as what the isp set up
(p3-01982), and our default website has always been accessabily at
http://p3-01982.myisp.com. I have changed the computer name to "ns1" and the
primary DNS suffix to "newdomain.com".

3. In the DNS manager I have created a new forward lookup zone for
"newdomain.com". It has been given 3 default records by the wizard:
Name Type Data
(same as parent folder) SOA [1],
ns1.newdomain.com.,hostmaster.newdomain.com
(same as parent folder) NS ns1.newdomain.com
ns1 A ip.ad.dr.ess

4. I have added another record which was intended to allocate newdomain.com
to the default website:
www A ip.ad.dr.ess

when doing this I got an error message saying the PTR cannot be found.

Do not create the associated PTRs unles the public IP is delegated to your
DNS it won't queried, and it will only conflict with the rest of the
Netblock you do not have.
5. I have setup host headers in IIS for the default site for the domains
newdomain.com and www.newdomain.com

This is as far as I've got. Have I done anything wrong so far ?

I wouldn't have changed the system name, but it's not necessarily
wrong.
I have some
more questions:

6. The server can now be accessed through both ns1.newdomain.com and the isp
domain, will this always be the case ? Is there any way I can stop access
through the ISP domain or will they have that permantly setup on their
servers ?

It will work that way until they remove the record in their DNS.
Which they may or may not do if they host the system for you.
7. Does the computer name have to match the name of the nameserver ?
No.

8. The default site is accessiblie at http://www.newdomain.com but not
http://newdomain.com ? The host headers are setup so am I missing a DNS
record

You need a blank host for the domain pointing to your web server's IP.
9. Do I need a CNAME record ?

No. CNAME records are for convenience and management, and it's
permissible to use plain old A records. In general, if you had five
different names you wanted your server known by, you might use an A
record for one name and CNAME alias the rest to that first name. Then
you only need to update the IP for that first record if the IP
changes.

Jeff
 
B

Blick

Kevin said:
In Ben <[email protected]> posted a question
Then Kevin replied below:
:
: I realise my post was quite long, but any advice for even just one or
: two questions would be very appreciated.
:
: Ben
Jeff Cochran answered your post here is a cut of his post if you have any
further questions let us know.
Hi Guys,

I've hosting my company websites on a dedicated server for the last couple
of years, with the DNS being managed by our ISP. I want to move the primary
DNS in house, and have been reading up on this, but I'm now more confused
than when I started. I will ist what I have done so far and hopefully
someone can let me know if what I have done is correct:

1. I have registered a new domain (newdomain.com) for this purpose and have
set up nameservers with the registrar (ns1.newdomain.com with the static IP
of our server).

2. The internal computer name has always remained as what the isp set up
(p3-01982), and our default website has always been accessabily at
http://p3-01982.myisp.com. I have changed the computer name to "ns1" and
the

primary DNS suffix to "newdomain.com".

3. In the DNS manager I have created a new forward lookup zone for
"newdomain.com". It has been given 3 default records by the wizard:
Name Type Data
(same as parent folder) SOA [1],
ns1.newdomain.com.,hostmaster.newdomain.com
(same as parent folder) NS ns1.newdomain.com
ns1 A ip.ad.dr.ess

4. I have added another record which was intended to allocate newdomain.com
to the default website:
www A ip.ad.dr.ess

when doing this I got an error message saying the PTR cannot be found.


Do not create the associated PTRs unles the public IP is delegated to your
DNS it won't queried, and it will only conflict with the rest of the
Netblock you do not have.

5. I have setup host headers in IIS for the default site for the domains
newdomain.com and www.newdomain.com

This is as far as I've got. Have I done anything wrong so far ?


I wouldn't have changed the system name, but it's not necessarily
wrong.

I have some
more questions:

6. The server can now be accessed through both ns1.newdomain.com and the
isp

domain, will this always be the case ? Is there any way I can stop access
through the ISP domain or will they have that permantly setup on their
servers ?


It will work that way until they remove the record in their DNS.
Which they may or may not do if they host the system for you.

7. Does the computer name have to match the name of the nameserver ?

No.


8. The default site is accessiblie at http://www.newdomain.com but not
http://newdomain.com ? The host headers are setup so am I missing a DNS
record


You need a blank host for the domain pointing to your web server's IP.

9. Do I need a CNAME record ?


No. CNAME records are for convenience and management, and it's
permissible to use plain old A records. In general, if you had five
different names you wanted your server known by, you might use an A
record for one name and CNAME alias the rest to that first name. Then
you only need to update the IP for that first record if the IP
changes.

Jeff
That's true you don't *need* a CNAME, but you can use one, if you'd like.
You can do it this way:

(same as parent folder) A ip.ad.dr.ess
www CNAME newdomain.com.

Regardless, if you still get problems, you should probably add *another*
host header, anyway: www.newdomain.com and newdomain.com should be
listed as host headers.

(You might try only this first, but I see nothing wrong with using a
CNAME either.)
 
A

Ace Fekay [MVP]

In
That's true you don't *need* a CNAME, but you can use one, if you'd
like. You can do it this way:

(same as parent folder) A ip.ad.dr.ess
www CNAME newdomain.com.

Regardless, if you still get problems, you should probably add
*another* host header, anyway: www.newdomain.com and newdomain.com
should be
listed as host headers.

(You might try only this first, but I see nothing wrong with using a
CNAME either.)

Just don't use a CNAME for an MX record.

--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies to the newsgroup so all can benefit.
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2000, MCSE+I, MCSA, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Active Directory
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top