Any way to save newsletter so it will be read properly on other computers?


M

MaryL

As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to the
church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are thinking of
sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save expense (postage
and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety of clipart, photos,
borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too much," but I don't
include everything in every newsletter, and many people have thanked me for
the changes I have made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a
page when I e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends
messages to me in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often
change it to single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts back to
1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am wondering if
there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way that it will be seen
properly on a variety of computers if we use e-mail for the congregation.
In other words, I want to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly,
photos remain in place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over
the types of settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
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M

macropod

Hi Mary,

The best way to ensure you document retains its intended formatting is to convert it to the PDF file format (there's an MS Add-In to
do this with Word 2007). With or without Word 2007, you can also do the conversion with Adobe Acrobat Professional and a wide range
of other PDF distillers.
 
M

MaryL

Ah! That's a good idea. I do have Word 2007 (running under Vista Home
Premium). I have not previously used any any Add-Inst. How/where do I
locate the process for doing that?

Thanks,
MaryL


macropod said:
Hi Mary,

The best way to ensure you document retains its intended formatting is to
convert it to the PDF file format (there's an MS Add-In to do this with
Word 2007). With or without Word 2007, you can also do the conversion with
Adobe Acrobat Professional and a wide range of other PDF distillers.

--
Cheers
macropod
[MVP - Microsoft Word]


MaryL said:
As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to the
church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are thinking of
sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save expense
(postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety of clipart,
photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too much," but
I don't include everything in every newsletter, and many people have
thanked me for the changes I have made. The problem is that some items
do not "hold" on a page when I e-mail them to our secretary. In fact,
one person sends messages to me in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15
spacing. I often change it to single-spacing to fit properly within
certain areas of the newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it
sometimes reverts back to 1.15. That is easily set back to
single-spacing, but I am wondering if there is any way to save the
newsletter in such a way that it will be seen properly on a variety of
computers if we use e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want
to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in
place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of
settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
S

Steve Hayes

As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to the
church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are thinking of
sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save expense (postage
and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety of clipart, photos,
borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too much," but I don't
include everything in every newsletter, and many people have thanked me for
the changes I have made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a
page when I e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends
messages to me in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often
change it to single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts back to
1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am wondering if
there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way that it will be seen
properly on a variety of computers if we use e-mail for the congregation.
In other words, I want to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly,
photos remain in place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over
the types of settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Send it as a PDF file.

There are several programs (some free) such as PDFCreator, PDFfactory etc
which will take output from the printer port and create a PDF file from it.
 
J

JoAnn Paules

Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that "fancy
fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to show up on your
recipients' computers.
 
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J

Jason

Also, are PDF larger in size?
JoAnn Paules said:
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to show
up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


MaryL said:
As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to the
church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are thinking
of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save expense
(postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety of clipart,
photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too much," but
I don't include everything in every newsletter, and many people have
thanked me for the changes I have made. The problem is that some items
do not "hold" on a page when I e-mail them to our secretary. In fact,
one person sends messages to me in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15
spacing. I often change it to single-spacing to fit properly within
certain areas of the newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it
sometimes reverts back to 1.15. That is easily set back to
single-spacing, but I am wondering if there is any way to save the
newsletter in such a way that it will be seen properly on a variety of
computers if we use e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want
to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in
place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of
settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
T

Terry Farrell

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so that
it display identically on all computers (which is the point of this thread).

Terry

Jason said:
Also, are PDF larger in size?
JoAnn Paules said:
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to show
up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


MaryL said:
As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save
expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety of
clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too
much," but I don't include everything in every newsletter, and many
people have thanked me for the changes I have made. The problem is that
some items do not "hold" on a page when I e-mail them to our secretary.
In fact, one person sends messages to me in Calibri. It is always set
with 1.15 spacing. I often change it to single-spacing to fit properly
within certain areas of the newsletter--but when our secretary receives,
it sometimes reverts back to 1.15. That is easily set back to
single-spacing, but I am wondering if there is any way to save the
newsletter in such a way that it will be seen properly on a variety of
computers if we use e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want
to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in
place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of
settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
D

Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com

Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Terry Farrell said:
Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of this
thread).

Terry

Jason said:
Also, are PDF larger in size?
JoAnn Paules said:
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to show
up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to save
expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a variety
of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That sounds like
"too much," but I don't include everything in every newsletter, and
many people have thanked me for the changes I have made. The problem
is that some items do not "hold" on a page when I e-mail them to our
secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to me in Calibri. It is
always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it to single-spacing to
fit properly within certain areas of the newsletter--but when our
secretary receives, it sometimes reverts back to 1.15. That is easily
set back to single-spacing, but I am wondering if there is any way to
save the newsletter in such a way that it will be seen properly on a
variety of computers if we use e-mail for the congregation. In other
words, I want to make sure that page breaks are viewed properly, photos
remain in place, etc. Obviously, we will not have any control over the
types of settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times New
Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003 doc is
usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48 KB, but I'm
not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would probably be
smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB .doc
file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com said:
Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Terry Farrell said:
Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of this
thread).

Terry

Jason said:
Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
M

MaryL

The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally run
about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column settings
(3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line for following
pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve several photos and the
page for birthdays). There is always some clipart, and the last page
(birthdays) has a decorative border around it. I use Times New Roman for
most of the newsletter, but I use different fonts for certain parts. For
example the person who sends in information for youth groups likes to have
me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for that portion. We also include
information for another small church, and I use different font for entries
from that church. There is a scanned picture (from an original pen-and-ink
drawing) of the church at the top of each newsletter, and that contributes
to the size. My concern with size is that some people in the congregation
probably still have dial-up while others have cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that. However, I
also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded fonts in
PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times
New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003
doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48 KB,
but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would
probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com said:
Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Terry Farrell said:
Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to
me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it
to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
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T

Terry Farrell

The size of your documents is almost certainly due to the photographs. After
you have installed all the pictures you are using in the Newsletter, if you
right-click a picture and select Properties, one of the option is COMPRESS
ALL which reduces the size of the picture suitable for displaying on screen.
That should have a dramatic affect on the file size.

Terry Farrell

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally run
about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line for
following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve several
photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some clipart, and the
last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around it. I use Times New
Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use different fonts for certain
parts. For example the person who sends in information for youth groups
likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for that portion. We
also include information for another small church, and I use different
font for entries from that church. There is a scanned picture (from an
original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church at the top of each newsletter,
and that contributes to the size. My concern with size is that some
people in the congregation probably still have dial-up while others have
cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that. However,
I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded fonts in
PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing that in
Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times
New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003
doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48
KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would
probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com said:
Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to
me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it
to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

Wrt embedding fonts, it appears that the PDF add-in has two quality
settings: Standard, which embeds fonts, and "Minimum size," which doesn't.
For Standard, the Options offers an option to create bitmaps from fonts that
can't be embedded. What I'm not sure of is whether you also need to choose
the embedding options for the document within Word Options (where you can
choose not to embed "common system fonts"). Anyone who has Office would have
Comic Sans, which might even be a "common system font." Naturally Word 2007
Help has nothing to say on the subject of "font embedding" (not that Word
2003 has much more), but the setting is in the Save portion of Word Options.

I would advise experimenting with the various settings. If you imagine that
most members will be just viewing the newsletters and not printing them, I
would suggest using the "Minimum size" setting and embedding fonts anyway.
Better still, if your church has a Web site, (some) members might prefer
just to get an email with a link to the newsletter posted online.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally run
about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line for
following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve several
photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some clipart, and the
last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around it. I use Times New
Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use different fonts for certain
parts. For example the person who sends in information for youth groups
likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for that portion. We
also include information for another small church, and I use different
font for entries from that church. There is a scanned picture (from an
original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church at the top of each newsletter,
and that contributes to the size. My concern with size is that some
people in the congregation probably still have dial-up while others have
cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that. However,
I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded fonts in
PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing that in
Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times
New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003
doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48
KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would
probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com said:
Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to
me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it
to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
M

MaryL

We want to try e-mail for people who have that capability. However, we have
a number of people in the congregation (especially among the elderly) who do
not use computers. So, we will need to use snail mail for them even if we
send most through e-mail. What would that process do to the documents that
we print in the "traditional" manner? Would it degrade the images?

Thanks,
MaryL


Terry Farrell said:
The size of your documents is almost certainly due to the photographs.
After you have installed all the pictures you are using in the Newsletter,
if you right-click a picture and select Properties, one of the option is
COMPRESS ALL which reduces the size of the picture suitable for displaying
on screen. That should have a dramatic affect on the file size.

Terry Farrell

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally run
about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line
for following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve
several photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some
clipart, and the last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around it.
I use Times New Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use different
fonts for certain parts. For example the person who sends in information
for youth groups likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for
that portion. We also include information for another small church, and
I use different font for entries from that church. There is a scanned
picture (from an original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church at the top
of each newsletter, and that contributes to the size. My concern with
size is that some people in the congregation probably still have dial-up
while others have cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that.
However, I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded
fonts in PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing
that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times
New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003
doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48
KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would
probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com" <[email protected]>
wrote in message Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file
so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when
I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to
me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it
to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
M

MaryL

A major problem is that I don't have any way to "test" e-mail on the various
computers involved. We have all levels of computer literacy/capability
among those who would receive the newsletters--all the way from the former
chair of the University computer department to the other extreme of people
who would just throw up their hands in frustration if everything is not
perfect as soon as they click on the document (with far more in that
category)...and those who have no computers at all and therefore would need
to continue receiving a print copy.

MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
Wrt embedding fonts, it appears that the PDF add-in has two quality
settings: Standard, which embeds fonts, and "Minimum size," which doesn't.
For Standard, the Options offers an option to create bitmaps from fonts
that can't be embedded. What I'm not sure of is whether you also need to
choose the embedding options for the document within Word Options (where
you can choose not to embed "common system fonts"). Anyone who has Office
would have Comic Sans, which might even be a "common system font."
Naturally Word 2007 Help has nothing to say on the subject of "font
embedding" (not that Word 2003 has much more), but the setting is in the
Save portion of Word Options.

I would advise experimenting with the various settings. If you imagine
that most members will be just viewing the newsletters and not printing
them, I would suggest using the "Minimum size" setting and embedding fonts
anyway. Better still, if your church has a Web site, (some) members might
prefer just to get an email with a link to the newsletter posted online.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally run
about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line
for following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve
several photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some
clipart, and the last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around it.
I use Times New Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use different
fonts for certain parts. For example the person who sends in information
for youth groups likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for
that portion. We also include information for another small church, and
I use different font for entries from that church. There is a scanned
picture (from an original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church at the top
of each newsletter, and that contributes to the size. My concern with
size is that some people in the congregation probably still have dial-up
while others have cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that.
However, I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded
fonts in PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing
that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only Times
New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The Word 2003
doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is usually 40-48
KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007 .docx file would
probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com" <[email protected]>
wrote in message Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file
so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when
I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages to
me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change it
to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
G

Graham Mayor

Given that the image resolution of most personal printers is quite low, you
may not notice the difference. The only way to establish that is to try it
with your illustrations.

--
<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>><<>
Graham Mayor - Word MVP

My web site www.gmayor.com

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>><<>

We want to try e-mail for people who have that capability. However,
we have a number of people in the congregation (especially among the
elderly) who do not use computers. So, we will need to use snail
mail for them even if we send most through e-mail. What would that
process do to the documents that we print in the "traditional"
manner? Would it degrade the images?
Thanks,
MaryL


Terry Farrell said:
The size of your documents is almost certainly due to the
photographs. After you have installed all the pictures you are using
in the Newsletter, if you right-click a picture and select
Properties, one of the option is COMPRESS ALL which reduces the size
of the picture suitable for displaying on screen. That should have a
dramatic affect on the file size. Terry Farrell

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They
generally run about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters
involve column settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns
with a dividing line for following pages, then page to 1 "column"
for pages that involve several photos and the page for birthdays). There
is always some clipart, and the last page (birthdays) has a
decorative border around it. I use Times New Roman for most of the
newsletter, but I use different fonts for certain parts. For
example the person who sends in information for youth groups likes
to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly large) for that portion. We
also include information for another small church, and I use
different font for entries from that church. There is a scanned
picture (from an original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church at the
top of each newsletter, and that contributes to the size. My
concern with size is that some people in the congregation probably
still have dial-up while others have cable broadband. I haven't
downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that.
However, I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have
embedded fonts in PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions
yet on doing that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells
and whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter,
anyway) are omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file
size will inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only
Times New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics.
The Word 2003 doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File
Size) is usually 40-48 KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH,
a Word 2007 .docx file would probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a
10,437 KB .doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts
embedded). --
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com"
Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the
PDF Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself
of my services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via
message
Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF
file so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point
of this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell
you that "fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if
you want them to show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


message As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and
e-mail it to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation
by e-mail to save expense (postage and paper) and also trees.
However, I use a variety of clipart, photos, borders, text
boxes, and fonts. That sounds like "too much," but I don't
include everything in every newsletter, and many people have
thanked me for the changes I have made. The problem is that
some items do not "hold" on a page when I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends
messages to me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often
change it to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes
reverts back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such
a way that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers
if we use e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want
to make sure that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of
settings that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

Terry Farrell

I agree with Graham. Unless you are outsourcing your printing so that they
are printed on a quality off-set printing press, the compressed images will
probably be satisfactory - though not quite to the standard of
non-compressed images.

If that compresses then too much, then the alternative (which is they way I
normally work) is to edit the pictures first in a graphics editor. I can
highly recommend the free-to-download IrfanView. This tiny little editor is
really easy to use. Just open your picture and then select Image |
Resize/Resample. In this dialog you can choose the exact size you want the
picture in your newsletter and you can select the quality by entering the
DPI (dots per inch) you want. For normal work like a Newsletter that is
going to be printed on a standard Inkjet or colour laser, then around 150
dpi is generally sufficient.

Save the picture as a jpeg (if not already one) and then use Insert |
Picture | From File... to place it in your Newsletter.

To give you an idea of the difference this makes, if I take an original
digital photograph that is just over 3 MB, after reducing it to 4" x 2.5" at
144 dpi, it is only 244 kb, a reduction factor of 12. This will make the
document considerably smaller whether you send it as a doc or PDF.

Terry

MaryL said:
We want to try e-mail for people who have that capability. However, we
have a number of people in the congregation (especially among the elderly)
who do not use computers. So, we will need to use snail mail for them
even if we send most through e-mail. What would that process do to the
documents that we print in the "traditional" manner? Would it degrade the
images?

Thanks,
MaryL


Terry Farrell said:
The size of your documents is almost certainly due to the photographs.
After you have installed all the pictures you are using in the
Newsletter, if you right-click a picture and select Properties, one of
the option is COMPRESS ALL which reduces the size of the picture suitable
for displaying on screen. That should have a dramatic affect on the file
size.

Terry Farrell

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally
run about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line
for following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve
several photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some
clipart, and the last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around
it. I use Times New Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use
different fonts for certain parts. For example the person who sends in
information for youth groups likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly
large) for that portion. We also include information for another small
church, and I use different font for entries from that church. There is
a scanned picture (from an original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church
at the top of each newsletter, and that contributes to the size. My
concern with size is that some people in the congregation probably still
have dial-up while others have cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that.
However, I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded
fonts in PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing
that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only
Times New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The
Word 2003 doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is
usually 40-48 KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007
.docx file would probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com"
<[email protected]>
wrote in message Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file
so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you
that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when
I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages
to me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change
it to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
T

Terry Farrell

I think that once you have controlled the size of your documents, PDF is the
way to go. For those who are going to receive the documents on their
computers, then compressing the pictures (using Word's Compress All feature)
is perfect, as screen resolution is only 96 dpi. Save that as PDF and send
to them as attachments to an email.

For those without a computer or email, then you may want to choose a
slightly higher resolution - but try it and see how it prints.

Terry Farrell

MaryL said:
A major problem is that I don't have any way to "test" e-mail on the
various computers involved. We have all levels of computer
literacy/capability among those who would receive the newsletters--all the
way from the former chair of the University computer department to the
other extreme of people who would just throw up their hands in frustration
if everything is not perfect as soon as they click on the document (with
far more in that category)...and those who have no computers at all and
therefore would need to continue receiving a print copy.

MaryL


Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
Wrt embedding fonts, it appears that the PDF add-in has two quality
settings: Standard, which embeds fonts, and "Minimum size," which
doesn't. For Standard, the Options offers an option to create bitmaps
from fonts that can't be embedded. What I'm not sure of is whether you
also need to choose the embedding options for the document within Word
Options (where you can choose not to embed "common system fonts"). Anyone
who has Office would have Comic Sans, which might even be a "common
system font." Naturally Word 2007 Help has nothing to say on the subject
of "font embedding" (not that Word 2003 has much more), but the setting
is in the Save portion of Word Options.

I would advise experimenting with the various settings. If you imagine
that most members will be just viewing the newsletters and not printing
them, I would suggest using the "Minimum size" setting and embedding
fonts anyway. Better still, if your church has a Web site, (some) members
might prefer just to get an email with a link to the newsletter posted
online.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

MaryL said:
The newsletters are often approximately 4 MB in size. They generally
run about 9-10 pages in length. All of the newsletters involve column
settings (3 columns for the first page, 2 columns with a dividing line
for following pages, then page to 1 "column" for pages that involve
several photos and the page for birthdays). There is always some
clipart, and the last page (birthdays) has a decorative border around
it. I use Times New Roman for most of the newsletter, but I use
different fonts for certain parts. For example the person who sends in
information for youth groups likes to have me use Comic Sans MS (fairly
large) for that portion. We also include information for another small
church, and I use different font for entries from that church. There is
a scanned picture (from an original pen-and-ink drawing) of the church
at the top of each newsletter, and that contributes to the size. My
concern with size is that some people in the congregation probably still
have dial-up while others have cable broadband.

I haven't downloaded the PDF plug-in yet, but I plan to do that.
However, I also do not know how to embed fonts in Word. I have embedded
fonts in PowerPoint, but I haven't found the instructions yet on doing
that in Word.

Thanks,
MaryL


If you choose "Smallest File Size" for the PDF, some of the bells and
whistles (which probably aren't necessary in a newsletter, anyway) are
omitted, but if some fonts must be embedded, then file size will
inevitably
increase at least a little.

For example, I create a one-page newsletter each week. It has only
Times New Roman and Arial fonts and a couple of simple graphics. The
Word 2003 doc is usually 58-62 KB; the PDF (Smallest File Size) is
usually 40-48 KB, but I'm not embedding any fonts. OTOH, a Word 2007
.docx file would probably be smaller than the PDF.

A 200-page book that I typeset (with a couple of photos) is a 10,437 KB
.doc file and a 7,264 KB PDF (Press Quality, with fonts embedded).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Doug Robbins - Word MVP on news.microsoft.com"
<[email protected]>
wrote in message Hi Terry,

That is not always the case. It depends upon the settings in the PDF
Printer Properties dialog.

--
Hope this helps.

Please reply to the newsgroup unless you wish to avail yourself of my
services on a paid consulting basis.

Doug Robbins - Word MVP, originally posted via msnews.microsoft.com

Yes. That's because all information has to be embedded in a PDF file
so
that it display identically on all computers (which is the point of
this
thread).

Terry

Also, are PDF larger in size?
Others have told you to use .pdf files but they didn't tell you
that
"fancy fonts" need to be embedded (if possible) if you want them to
show up on your recipients' computers.

--

JoAnn Paules
MVP Microsoft [Publisher]
Tech Editor for "Microsoft Publisher 2007 For Dummies"


As some of you know, I prepare our church newsletter and e-mail it
to
the church. It is then printed and sent out by U.S. Mail. We are
thinking of sending it to members of the congregation by e-mail to
save expense (postage and paper) and also trees. However, I use a
variety of clipart, photos, borders, text boxes, and fonts. That
sounds like "too much," but I don't include everything in every
newsletter, and many people have thanked me for the changes I have
made. The problem is that some items do not "hold" on a page when
I
e-mail them to our secretary. In fact, one person sends messages
to me
in Calibri. It is always set with 1.15 spacing. I often change
it to
single-spacing to fit properly within certain areas of the
newsletter--but when our secretary receives, it sometimes reverts
back
to 1.15. That is easily set back to single-spacing, but I am
wondering if there is any way to save the newsletter in such a way
that it will be seen properly on a variety of computers if we use
e-mail for the congregation. In other words, I want to make sure
that
page breaks are viewed properly, photos remain in place, etc.
Obviously, we will not have any control over the types of settings
that various recipients use.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
MaryL
 
M

MaryL

Thanks for the help, everyone. The suggestion for using PDF turned out to
be an excellent idea. The download worked smoothly, and it only takes about
two seconds to "save as" to PDF. That even solves another issue that I have
been considering--that is, how to make this file more functional for those
with some vision problelms. By using, PDF, they can easily click on the
arrow at the top of the screen to enlarge everything, yet all of the
original boxes and other settings are retained.

The one remaining problem (not as important) is that the file size is now
truly massive! I haven't tried compressing, as someone on the NG suggested,
because this newsletter does not contain any photos. And, despite that, it
is extremely large, and I do have a fear that the size may cause a problem
for some people. The original size of the newsletter is 2.80 MB. The
size when sized to PDF becomes 840 KB.

MaryL
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

So the PDF is at least smaller than the .doc file. That size won't be much
of a burden on those with broadband but will definitely be a large lump for
dial-up. I would suggest offering members the option of getting a link (to
the file online) rather than an attachment. It will still take (almost) as
long to download, but they will be able to choose the time to do it instead
of having it unpredictably gumming up their email. I remember how much I
hated that when I was on dial-up, and I'm still not crazy about it--because
you have no idea what it is you're investing so much download time on until
it actually arrives (and then it's usually a PPT of cute baby animals or
scenic landscapes, accompanied by kitschy music and typo-ridden captions,
from my cousin!).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org
 

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