ADV-NEWS, Dell may offer Linux as alternative to Windows, OpenOffice as an alternative to M$ Office

  • Thread starter Cymbal Man Freq.
  • Start date

C

Cymbal Man Freq.

Dell may offer Linux as alternative to Windows
1 hour, 7 minutes ago


BOSTON (Reuters) - Dell Inc. is considering offering the Linux operating
system as an alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows on its personal
computers, a Dell spokesman said on Tuesday.

The PC maker said it received more than 100,000 customer requests for Linux in a
"suggestion box" posted on Dell's Web site less than three weeks ago.

"We are listening to what customers are saying about Linux and taking it into
consideration," said Dell spokesman David Lord. "We are going forward. Let's
say, 'Certainly stay tuned."'

Linux is an open-source operating system that is generally available for free
and can be used to run most computers, including Dell's PCs.

Dell does not break out how much it charges for Windows when it calculates the
cost of a computer system, but a basic upgrade version of the software generally
retails for $99.

The only operating system that Dell currently offers on its PCs is Windows, with
one exception, Lord said. It sells high-end Linux desktops designed specifically
for use in oil and gas exploration, he said.

Making Linux available on other Dell PCs has been the top request since the Web
site was launched on February 16, according to data posted on the site, as of
Tuesday evening.

The second most popular request was that Dell offer another popular free
software title, OpenOffice, which competes with Microsoft Office programs
including Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
 
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D

Dustin Harper

A lot of reasons why they won't let it happen is because of the piracy. With
a lot of the software piracy, it'd be easy to save a couple hundred bucks,
use a copy of Vista or XP that you already have on one PC and install it on
the two new ones you just ordered with Linux. Or all out hacked copy. It's
been done before.

That's the main reason. The other is because they can't support Linux. It
would take a lot more resources and too much money. People would want to
save a buck and get Linux, yet have -zero- knowledge about it and spend
hours on the phone with Dell, or some other tech support.

It would make the Linux marketshare jump, force a lot of users to learn
Linux (and probably stick with it), and force more innovation in the OS
manufacturer market. It happened with video cards: NVIDIA vs. 3dFX, then
stagnent for a bit, the NVIDIA vs. ATI and we had some major improvements.
Same with AMD vs. Intel. We need the competition. It's good for the
consumer.

Wish it would happen on one hand, not so much on the other.
 
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J

john

Dustin Harper said:
A lot of reasons why they won't let it happen is because of the piracy.
With a lot of the software piracy, it'd be easy to save a couple hundred
bucks, use a copy of Vista or XP that you already have on one PC and
install it on the two new ones you just ordered with Linux. Or all out
hacked copy. It's been done before.

Who is "they?" Microsoft or Dell?
If MS, you're saying the Microsoft "won't let it happen" because they feel
that their OS will wind up in the hard drive eventually anyway?
And the point of that is? That we should all pay a MS licensing fee for
all PC's regardless of whether or not any MS OS is actually on it?

After having sat in a dark basement, handcuffed to a chair under a single
dim light bulb, and having been horsewhipped with a rubber hose for the last
19 hours by Bill G's henchmen, I can honestly say....
Yea, I'll go along with that...
Yea, that's the ticket...

That's the main reason. The other is because they can't support Linux. It
would take a lot more resources and too much money. People would want to
save a buck and get Linux, yet have -zero- knowledge about it and spend
hours on the phone with Dell, or some other tech support.

Anyone who has EVER attempted to acquire ANY kind of technical or customer
support from Dell (and probably many others) already knows that they are not
very concerned with either.... Why not throw another OS into the mix?
They're just route all THOSE calls to some other non-English speaking script
reader in India. If you ever actually do muster enough patience and sheer
willpower to hold out hoping to speak to a human being, it won't matter
anyway - How can you tell if the person on the other end is talking about
Windows, Linux or blueberry muffin recipes?
 

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