Windows XP will not boot after updating


G

Guest

Hi there,

I'm running a dual-boot system with XP 64-bit on a 40 GB hard drive and XP
Pro with integrated Service Pack 2 on a separate 160 GB hard drive. I
recently just installed Windows XP Pro on my 160 GB hard drive after doing a
zero-fill on it. Things were going fine until last night when I went to the
Windows Update site and checked of all of the updates that I wanted. (Some of
the extras included Media Player 11 and .NET Framework 3.0) After the Windows
had finished updating, it prompted for a restart, which I allowed. I haven't
seen Windows since then. When the computer tries to boot, the internal
speaker gives off a long beep, and the moniter doesn't even register a
signal. After the beep ends, the computer simply sits there without any hard
drive activity. Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

You are hearing what is called a 'beep code" from the motherboard. Some part
of the hardware is not functioning. Goggle for your motherboard beep codes.
One long beep is probably the video card, keyboard, or ram.
 
S

smlunatick

Hi there,

I'm running a dual-boot system with XP 64-bit on a 40 GB hard drive and XP
Pro with integrated Service Pack 2 on a separate 160 GB hard drive. I
recently just installed Windows XP Pro on my 160 GB hard drive after doing a
zero-fill on it. Things were going fine until last night when I went to the
Windows Update site and checked of all of the updates that I wanted. (Some of
the extras included Media Player 11 and .NET Framework 3.0) After the Windows
had finished updating, it prompted for a restart, which I allowed. I haven't
seen Windows since then. When the computer tries to boot, the internal
speaker gives off a long beep, and the moniter doesn't even register a
signal. After the beep ends, the computer simply sits there without any hard
drive activity. Any help/suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks


Can you boot into a "safe mode" in Windows XP Pro? One update you
might have gotten was a video card driver. Windows Update versions of
most drivers can cause problems, as you describe.
 
G

Guest

Thanks for the ideas, I've been messing around with it for most of this
morning and got it back to normal, that is, until I plug in the Ethernet
cable that I use for internet. It's happened twice - the first time
everything worked until I restarted the computer, then once again got the
same "beep code." The second time, I had the Ehternet cable plugged in before
I had started the computer. Everything had worked fine before, but once
again...

Both times I had used the same Ethernet jack on my motherboard. So, I've got
a few more questions:
1) Would I be able to circumvent this problem if I was to try the second
jack? and
2) Would I be able to circumvent this problem by buying a PCI Wireless
Adapter? (Something I was preparing to do soon anyways) and lastly,
3) How would I go about fixing the jack that's been causing the problem
(assuming it's just one of the jacks)

Again, thanks for all the help
 
G

Guest

Sometimes the motherboard has jumpers that you can cross to cut out some
things. The RJ-45 jacks are going to have that actually written on the board
where the pins for the jumper are, if they exist.
 
S

smlunatick

Thanks for the ideas, I've been messing around with it for most of this
morning and got it back to normal, that is, until I plug in the Ethernet
cable that I use for internet. It's happened twice - the first time
everything worked until I restarted the computer, then once again got the
same "beep code." The second time, I had the Ehternet cable plugged in before
I had started the computer. Everything had worked fine before, but once
again...

Both times I had used the same Ethernet jack on my motherboard. So, I've got
a few more questions:
1) Would I be able to circumvent this problem if I was to try the second
jack? and
2) Would I be able to circumvent this problem by buying a PCI Wireless
Adapter? (Something I was preparing to do soon anyways) and lastly,
3) How would I go about fixing the jack that's been causing the problem
(assuming it's just one of the jacks)

Again, thanks for all the help






- Show quoted text -

A few things you can try:

1) BIOS/CMOS update. See if any possible updates fix these type of
problems.
2) Try a different Ethernet cable.
3) Try a PCI wired adapter. This should confirm that the old network
adapter has a physical problem. If this work, then the older Ethernet
port is "physically" broken and would likely require "costly" repairs,
if the motherboard is not under warranty.
 
Ad

Advertisements

S

smlunatick

Thanks for the ideas, I've been messing around with it for most of this
morning and got it back to normal, that is, until I plug in the Ethernet
cable that I use for internet. It's happened twice - the first time
everything worked until I restarted the computer, then once again got the
same "beep code." The second time, I had the Ehternet cable plugged in before
I had started the computer. Everything had worked fine before, but once
again...

Both times I had used the same Ethernet jack on my motherboard. So, I've got
a few more questions:
1) Would I be able to circumvent this problem if I was to try the second
jack? and
2) Would I be able to circumvent this problem by buying a PCI Wireless
Adapter? (Something I was preparing to do soon anyways) and lastly,
3) How would I go about fixing the jack that's been causing the problem
(assuming it's just one of the jacks)

Again, thanks for all the help






- Show quoted text -

You still would require a wired Ethernet adapter to:

1) Configure/control the wireless network router settings (WEP/WPA
keys.)
2) Update the wireless network router firmware.
 
G

Guest

Am I right in assuming that since the router is connected to another
computer, that all I would need in the 'broken' computer is just the PCI
Wireless card?

Unfortunately, I've had this MOBO for about 3 years now, so the warranties
have all expired. If I get a positive response to the above idea, then it'll
be a good enough fix until I decide to build another computer.
 
G

Guest

Am I right in assuming that since the router is connected to another
computer, that all I would need in the 'broken' computer is just the PCI
Wireless card?

Unfortunately, I've had this MOBO for about 3 years now, so the warranties
have all expired. If I get a positive response to the above idea, then it'll
be a good enough fix until I decide to build another computer.
 
S

smlunatick

Am I right in assuming that since the router is connected to another
computer, that all I would need in the 'broken' computer is just the PCI
Wireless card?

Unfortunately, I've had this MOBO for about 3 years now, so the warranties
have all expired. If I get a positive response to the above idea, then it'll
be a good enough fix until I decide to build another computer.





- Show quoted text -

I guess YES. Any wireless adapter can help you (in a pinch) to re-
connect the "defective" PC. However, my experience with wireless
adapters are that the signals keep disconnecting all the time. I
would not rely on wireless adapters if this PC has "important" data
that you use across the network.
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

Alright. This is just my personal computer - absolutely no important data
whatsoever. I would simply prefer to have an internet connection on it is all.

Again, thanks for all of the help
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top