why 80gb hd is only 74,4?


Z

zero

Buyed a 80gb hd, but only shows 74,4 why?
Is there a way to recover those "lost" mb?
(hd is still empty)
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John John

zero said:
Buyed a 80gb hd, but only shows 74,4 why?
Is there a way to recover those "lost" mb?
(hd is still empty)
Look for a post by Patti MacLeod less than 12 hours ago, she explains it.

RE: Hard drize size is incorrectly displayed.

Bottom line is that the size of your disk is correctly shown, you have
no missing or "lost" disk space.

John
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

zero said:
Buyed a 80gb hd, but only shows 74,4 why?
Is there a way to recover those "lost" mb?
(hd is still empty)

There are no "lost" MB and there is nothing to recover. What you bought was
a 74.4MB drive, incorrectly described as an 80MB drive.

All hard drive manufacturers do this. They define 1GB as 1,000,000,000
bytes, while the rest of the computer world, including Windows, defines it
as 2 to the 30th power (1,073,741,824) bytes. So an 80 billion byte drive is
actually about 74.4GB.

Some people point out that the official international standard defines the
"G" of GB as one billion, not 1,073,741,824. Correct though they are, using
the binary value of GB is so well established in the computer world that I
consider using the decimal value of a billion to be deceptive marketing.
 
E

Enkidu

There are no "lost" MB and there is nothing to recover. What you
bought was a 74.4MB drive, incorrectly described as an 80MB drive.

All hard drive manufacturers do this. They define 1GB as
1,000,000,000 bytes, while the rest of the computer world, including
Windows, defines it as 2 to the 30th power (1,073,741,824) bytes. So
an 80 billion byte drive is actually about 74.4GB.

Some people point out that the official international standard
defines the "G" of GB as one billion, not 1,073,741,824. Correct
though they are, using the binary value of GB is so well established
in the computer world that I consider using the decimal value of a
billion to be deceptive marketing.
I disagree. Deceptive it may be. Incorrect it isn't. But this is a
philosophical point, not technical one, isn't it?

Cheers,

Cliff
 
B

Boris

There are no "lost" MB and there is nothing to recover. What you bought was
a 74.4MB drive, incorrectly described as an 80MB drive.

All hard drive manufacturers do this. They define 1GB as 1,000,000,000
bytes, while the rest of the computer world, including Windows, defines it
as 2 to the 30th power (1,073,741,824) bytes. So an 80 billion byte drive is
actually about 74.4GB.

Some people point out that the official international standard defines the
"G" of GB as one billion, not 1,073,741,824. Correct though they are, using
the binary value of GB is so well established in the computer world that I
consider using the decimal value of a billion to be deceptive marketing.
So the larger the advertised drive, the bigger the difference between
it's binary size and it's decimal size. Regardless, it holds the same
amount of data. But I agree, drives should be advertised as binary
size, or they should at least have an asterisk on the box (or add)
that indicates how the operating system will report it. For instance:
80 GB decimal; 74.4 GB binary

I think it's very deceptive, and, of course, intentional.
 
C

C A Upsdell

There are no "lost" MB and there is nothing to recover. What you bought was
a 74.4MB drive, incorrectly described as an 80MB drive.

All hard drive manufacturers do this. They define 1GB as 1,000,000,000
bytes, while the rest of the computer world, including Windows, defines it
as 2 to the 30th power (1,073,741,824) bytes. So an 80 billion byte drive is
actually about 74.4GB.

Some people point out that the official international standard defines the
"G" of GB as one billion, not 1,073,741,824. Correct though they are, using
the binary value of GB is so well established in the computer world that I
consider using the decimal value of a billion to be deceptive marketing.
Ah, deceptive. Years ago, back in the 70's, I worked with a company
that sold computers which had very little RAM, and my company's
marketing people wanted to (re)define a byte to be 4 bits so that they
could boast double the amount of RAM.
 
J

Jim

So the larger the advertised drive, the bigger the difference between
it's binary size and it's decimal size. Regardless, it holds the same
amount of data. But I agree, drives should be advertised as binary
size, or they should at least have an asterisk on the box (or add)
that indicates how the operating system will report it. For instance:
80 GB decimal; 74.4 GB binary

I think it's very deceptive, and, of course, intentional.
Want to buy my used car? ;-)
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

Ken Blake, MVP

C said:
Ah, deceptive. Years ago, back in the 70's, I worked with a company
that sold computers which had very little RAM, and my company's
marketing people wanted to (re)define a byte to be 4 bits so that they
could boast double the amount of RAM.

I used to always cite the actual size of the monitor screen as opposed to
the claimed size. but now that LCDs have largely replaced CRTs, that's a
much less common issue.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top