Wall mounted computer


S

Seymore4Head

I was reading Reddit last night and saw where some guy had mounted a
computer on the wall. I don't remember if the one he had was water
cooled or not, but after looking at it, I had a question.
http://imgur.com/a/x75U2#0 (different one)
If you have to connect the memory and the video card to the
motherboard with ribbon cable, wouldn't that degrade the speed?
 
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F

Flasherly

If you have to connect the memory and the video card to the
motherboard with ribbon cable, wouldn't that degrade the speed?

Copyrighting the wheel is no longer possible, although they're still
working feverishly on the right to be dimwitted. Nice try, but for
your information, stating memory 'and the video card' is redundant,
since any idiot knows video cards are already populated with memory.

http://www.amazon.com/BestDealUSA-Ribbon-Extension-Extender-Adapter/dp/B006DQRUZ8

--
Labor analysis costs for my technical proficiency-

Correct answers are $75.
Answers are on special this week for $25.
Dumb looks are still free only if you hurry while they last.
 
F

Flasherly

Good quality, product made right/works. For those who are unsure of how
it works, this cable will allow one to use almost ANY PCIE card with the
larger PCIE slot male plug; however, it will reduce the speed of the
device to 1X. Also, cards will not work that require more power than a
1X slot unless they have a separate power connector.

I'm adaptable. Do I have any other choice?

If I want, for instance, to keep my high-quality ASUS Xonar
soundboards, their laser/optical connections for uncompromising
signals to my amps, decent quality WWW mic'ed telephony -- anything
but some junk chipped onto a MB make (once you've used those Xonars
it's hard, so hard to go back).

....Maybe a USB3 adaptor, maybe a controller. . .I'm saying, plenty of
neat stuff for PCI slots, I guess, still remaining on Newegg.

MB manufacturers, on the other hand -- especially in budget builds,
say for convenience, MBs that cost less than $300 -- they've all but
cut out PCI slots for an option, just maybe, with 1 or 2 Mini X1 PCI
2.2 risers still to show for a reminder of PCI's sake and custom
building.

Answer me this: Do starving men turn up their noses when facing down a
nice bowl of doggy food?

I think not.
 
L

larrymoencurly

On Fri, 03 Oct 2014 18:55:01 -0400, Al Drake <[email protected]>

If I want, for instance, to keep my high-quality ASUS Xonar
soundboards, their laser/optical connections for uncompromising
signals to my amps,

I'm not familiar with that sound card or any optical audio
transmission except TOSlink, but if the transmission is digital,
the quality can't be improved with optical instead of electrical,
while analog optical should be worse than wires, except through
the core of a nuclear reactor.
 
P

Paul

Seymore4Head said:
I was reading Reddit last night and saw where some guy had mounted a
computer on the wall. I don't remember if the one he had was water
cooled or not, but after looking at it, I had a question.
http://imgur.com/a/x75U2#0 (different one)
If you have to connect the memory and the video card to the
motherboard with ribbon cable, wouldn't that degrade the speed?

I'm surprised a person who has gone to the trouble
of doing this, isn't proudly providing benchmarks.

PCI Express is full duplex, and uses regular ACKs or
even piggyback ACKs. Burst transfers would be relatively
unaffected by increased path length. The jitter budget
is likely worse. Issuing single commands is likely slower
(because you're waiting for an answer to come back).
And the user is not likely to notice, since there was
already a lot of "slop" in PCI Express. You may have been
told you had a 4GB/sec bus, when in fact due to limited
buffer size in the chipset, the transfers were already at
slightly less than 2GB/sec. Review sites don't seem to have
any tools for benching this stuff. They're missing out
on a lot of fun, by not testing for that (variation between
the various companies, when it comes to PCI Express stuff).

For the memory, you'd have to change the "time of flight"
parameter on the memory controller. The first cycle latency
is likely different. Transaction rate (megatransfers per second)
would be lower. And again, you'd need a benchmark to measure it,
as casual observation, you might not be able to see it.

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

aOn Fri, 3 Oct 2014 20:01:56 -0700 (PDT), (e-mail address removed)
wrote:
I'm not familiar with that sound card or any optical audio
transmission except TOSlink, but if the transmission is digital,
the quality can't be improved with optical instead of electrical,
while analog optical should be worse than wires, except through
the core of a nuclear reactor.


That's right, only I hitched up to S/PDIF: Technological terminology
for saying the exact same thing. I wasn't aware that that particular
signal could be anything but fundamentally digitally encased in
transmission standards for binary processing prior to decoding for
analog purposes. It's path is to run off the Xonar soundboard and into
a Behringer pro-rackmount preprocessing unit;- the Behringer is then
acting effectively for a pre-amp, and its XLR outputs I drop down to
the actual amp, a racked ART unit's 1/4" phone input connectors.

All well within tamed domestic specifications: two SS amps and four
monitors in a stereo array from a mixer, both amps slightly below 200
watts. Haven't quite graduated to a CROWN or such, and haven't a clue
if I'll ever reach a warm from valved amps. (My four valved amps,
they're all mono and instrument amps, nowhere near audiophile gear.)

The Xonar, for your information, presently is "king of the hill" (or
near to) among a regard given it from audiophile types in the sound
community forums. Only gripe I have short of a continued enjoyment
and satisfaction it's provided me, is the software sound-volume
adjustments suck big, fat platypus eggs. <Sigh...> What I could do
with a genuinely thoughtful, engineered and precision volume
adjustment for both front/rear channels when [using those two signal
sets for] "dialing-in" a mixed balance between two discretely mixed
amplifier/speaker sets.
 
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L

larrymoencurly

aOn Fri, 3 Oct 2014 20:01:56 -0700 (PDT), (e-mail address removed)
wrote:
I'm not familiar with that sound card or any optical audio
transmission except TOSlink, but if the transmission is digital,
the quality can't be improved with optical instead of electrical,
while analog optical should be worse than wires, except through
the core of a nuclear reactor.

That's right, only I hitched up to S/PDIF: Technological terminology
for saying the exact same thing. I wasn't aware that that particular
signal could be anything but fundamentally digitally encased in
transmission standards for binary processing prior to decoding for
analog purposes. It's path is to run off the Xonar soundboard and into
a Behringer pro-rackmount preprocessing unit;- the Behringer is then
acting effectively for a pre-amp, and its XLR outputs I drop down to
the actual amp, a racked ART unit's 1/4" phone input connectors.

All well within tamed domestic specifications: two SS amps and four
monitors in a stereo array from a mixer, both amps slightly below 200
watts. Haven't quite graduated to a CROWN or such, and haven't a clue
if I'll ever reach a warm from valved amps. (My four valved amps,
they're all mono and instrument amps, nowhere near audiophile gear.)

The Xonar, for your information, presently is "king of the hill" (or
near to) among a regard given it from audiophile types in the sound
community forums. Only gripe I have short of a continued enjoyment
and satisfaction it's provided me, is the software sound-volume
adjustments suck big, fat platypus eggs. <Sigh...> What I could do
with a genuinely thoughtful, engineered and precision volume
adjustment for both front/rear channels when [using those two signal
sets for] "dialing-in" a mixed balance between two discretely mixed
amplifier/speaker sets.

I have no digital audio processing, except for what's on my
motherboards, a PCI audio card (used because a motherboard's audio
blew out when my Antec power supply's +5Vstandby line put out 13V),
and my cheap Onkyo receivers. But on the analog side outside the
computer, it seems that speakers matter much more than any electronics.
 
F

Flasherly

But on the analog side outside the
computer, it seems that speakers matter much more than any electronics.

Took awhile for a steal on those. Around Christmas sales a couple
years ago, MusiciansFriend.com had a couple of 4watt impedance Alesis
studio monitors. I sold a speaker brand pair I'd bought/was using for
$25 just to get rid of them that fast.

Reviews were even worse. Speaker reviews are like guppies in a fish
bowl - the multiply far too fast for me. I wanted more: the real deal
- profession studio engineers. Eventually I found the guy and pulled
up a speckle of that murky fishbowl - a person working in a studio
environment and his impression of working with the Alesis.

People want to hear what they want to hear, and he's the sparkle to
turn the bowl into a revolving glitter dome I wanted;- and, yes, the
amplifiers and Behringer preprocessor do matter.

http://artproaudio.com/art_products/studio_amplifiers/product/sla1/

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DEQ2496

(My Carver amp and Polk Audio Studio Reference Series speakers -- the
other half of what's paired out of that mixer for various a wet/dry
signal mixing -- they're both treasures for being 30- or 40-year-old
equipment that's well regarded and in demand.)
 
L

larrymoencurly

Took awhile for a steal on those. Around Christmas sales a couple
years ago, MusiciansFriend.com had a couple of 4watt impedance Alesis
studio monitors. I sold a speaker brand pair I'd bought/was using for
$25 just to get rid of them that fast.

Reviews were even worse. Speaker reviews are like guppies in a fish
bowl - the multiply far too fast for me. I wanted more: the real deal
- profession studio engineers. Eventually I found the guy and pulled
up a speckle of that murky fishbowl - a person working in a studio
environment and his impression of working with the Alesis.

People want to hear what they want to hear, and he's the sparkle to
turn the bowl into a revolving glitter dome I wanted;- and, yes, the
amplifiers and Behringer preprocessor do matter.

http://artproaudio.com/art_products/studio_amplifiers/product/sla1/

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DEQ2496

(My Carver amp and Polk Audio Studio Reference Series speakers -- the
other half of what's paired out of that mixer for various a wet/dry
signal mixing -- they're both treasures for being 30- or 40-year-old
equipment that's well regarded and in demand.)

It seems like that was the golden age of audio amplifiers, and
sites like DIYaudio.com frequently mention amps from that period,
including Carver's. I use a 75W/channel @8 ohms Leach amp built
from an article published in Audio magazine article from the era.
It was well reviewed but also very rugged and stable. I was really
happy that it didn't blow up when I first plugged it in because a
friend of mine told me that an amp he built from another magazine's
plans oscillated and shorted all its power transistors in the first
few seconds. His amp was not Ampzilla, which I wanted to build but
couldn't afford.

That Behringer equalizer's "feedback destroyer" seems like a handy
feature to have. My equalizer is just an analog unit, from another
1970s magazine article, only the dB scale is way off because I was
supposed to use "W" taper slide pots but couldn't find anything like
them so used linear pots instead.
 
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F

Flasherly

It seems like that was the golden age of audio amplifiers, and
sites like DIYaudio.com frequently mention amps from that period,
including Carver's. I use a 75W/channel @8 ohms Leach amp built
from an article published in Audio magazine article from the era.
It was well reviewed but also very rugged and stable. I was really
happy that it didn't blow up when I first plugged it in because a
friend of mine told me that an amp he built from another magazine's
plans oscillated and shorted all its power transistors in the first
few seconds. His amp was not Ampzilla, which I wanted to build but
couldn't afford.

That Behringer equalizer's "feedback destroyer" seems like a handy
feature to have. My equalizer is just an analog unit, from another
1970s magazine article, only the dB scale is way off because I was
supposed to use "W" taper slide pots but couldn't find anything like
them so used linear pots instead.

Sounds like you know what you're doing, and then some. Never heard of
a W measure on pots, but imagine it's a logarithmic/linear thing if
the decibel "action" is out of whack;- I'd sooner have that then
unbalanced channels, which drives me nuts (I've a power meter for
measuring them, can see source signal output and wattage movements
from what the speakers are being fed).

Feedback monitoring, as well as a chipped routine for running through
a noise generator and microphone loop, optimizing the equalization
according to some preset Behringer engineers determined. Couple of
other things such as stage (speaker distances) delay timings that set
it apart from most EQ boxes.

I've never used either the above features, although may, especially
the feedback;- the room's acoustics analyzer is totally useless the
way my walls are setup: one speaker's firing into a void (my dining
room), where the other is directly reflected back from a partial wall
behind the couch). "Sweet spot" doesn't really apply as much as
moving lots of air.

I also got mine when it was $200 (its went up $100 since then).

For everything I really don't know, didn't at the time of combining
both old technology (carver) alongside new (the art amp) -- it all was
haphazard and just sort of fell into place. All that started by
recording a friend's vocals and culminated with this...

http://www.amazon.com/PreSonus-Audi..._sbs_pc_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0JA23J55XCZB3MEEA12S

A couple very decent dub-overs while using the PreSonus (I made him
buy that for himself);- For me, (aside from delivering what I told him
I would - highend recordings by studying and transposing what he
already knew, told me what do from old analogue gear), I learned
recording, getting a tasty taste for what others are doing with
computers, sound equipment options, are about in revolutionizing home
recording.

What you see is what you get. In my case it happened, falling into
place piecemeal without any integral planning. I'm suitably amazed,
though. Been a "music lover" all my life.

Wouldn't mind someday getting up to your speed with a push-pull Class
B kit. Aroundabout 80-watts in a 4 6L6 or EL84 configuration might
make up for lower output from a Class A amp. Dunno. I'm not that
sophisticated or experienced with circuitry principles and design.
Least to mention anything in that quality, elegant gear, "newly
engineered," at the bare minimum beginning out of Hong Kong from
Chinese/Ebay kits;- a bare minimum -- at my total -system- outlay for
the price I piecemeal built this new solid-state setup -- considering
the power I want, (I am not buying speakers again for efficiency
matching), easily could be double the price. A lot of money for
gambling with both operator expertise, at such levels of equipment,
and quality issues, somewhat, off the Pacific Rim.

Big dreams for diminishing returns, really, at some point, being
basically satisfied with what I have in solid state. I've never even
heard/listened to a valved setup, except for the valved amps I use
both for nylon classical and electric guitars. (Even though I do
pretty much detest playing an instrument through solid state;- In any
proper musicological dictionary that is what is called a Tone Whore.)
 

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