Using a DELL 2600 PowerEdge as a Desktop PC


P

Paul

(e-mail address removed) wrote:

[ Some answers inline... ]
Ok. I booted the DELL 2600 server about 60 times in an attempt to get back to the password screen (or past it).

I went into BIOS and under "Integrated Devices" changed "Embedded RAID Controller" from "Off" to "SCSI".
(The RAID option causes a warning that data will be lost).
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/1IntegratedDevices_zpsc498632d.jpg

So the SCSI setting was probably lost when the battery fell off.
This allows me to boot as far as the Windows 2000 Server splash screen:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/2Win2000Server_zps5bd0f4cc.jpg,
Followed by a "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg
(The blue screen tells me to run CHKDSK /F, but I don't know how to do that).

You would need to slave the SCSI drive to another computer.

Either that, or boot your WinXP installer CD to the recovery console,
and see if the CHKDSK works in there. You may need to press F6 and offer
a driver for the SCSI controller. I've never done that here, as
usually I'm working with IDE drives on the chipset. So look at the
ID of the chip or card controlling your SCSI drive, and locate a
driver for it for WinXP (if using the WinXP disc for the recovery
console).

My SCSI work was mostly with my Macintosh. I've moved a SCSI card into
the PC a couple of times, but that was for usage of an old 9GB drive
as a data drive. Nothing really educational happened there, because
I wasn't trying to boot from it. (I have three or four cheap SCSI
cards here, that are very infrequently used. A 2906 still runs
my SCSI document scanner.)
A weird thing is that three times out of all the times I booted I got
a slightly different BIOS screen that gave me an extra option. ?!? Notice
there is nothing in between "Boot Sequence" and Integrated Devices":
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/4BootSequence_zpsb33cace7.jpg

If there is no hard disk detected, that might account for the BIOS screen.
Some SCSI setups might have a variable timeout setting (or, things
like staggered spin, for SCSI chains full of drives). Maybe it is
a timeout set too low or something.

IBA GE Slot 8388 appears to be a LAN card boot option. You would
think that would appear regularly, unless there is not sufficient
low memory for the INT 0x13 support for LAN boot to load. Depending on
how many SCSI controllers are present, other boot ROMs might not
get to load, making the boot order listing "flaky" in behavior.
When I did get that option, putting "Hard drive C" at the top in "Boot Sequence"
didn't help me get any further into the booting process. And putting either the
Seagate drive or the IBM drive at the top in "Hard-Disk Drive Sequence" didn't either:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...puter/5Hard-DiskDriveSequence_zps8edbbf27.jpg

(The other three hard drives don't show up in BIOS at all, but during
the boot-up sequence it show as each is spun up).

Could be staggered spin. For SCSI, there can be jumper blocks or dip switches
that enable staggered spin. Staggered spin is used to reduce the
strain on the power supply. One disk at a time, takes turns drawing the
2-3 amp spinup current. It reduces the peak current the power supply must
support. You could defeat the staggered spin, if you wanted the drives
to spin up in unison. If the power supply has a reasonably hefty 5V and 12V
current rating, it probably wouldn't be a big deal to spin them all
at once. I spin up five drives regularly here, on a 460W power supply,
without staggered spin or anything of that nature.
I tried every combination I could think of in "PCI IRQ Assignment":
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/6PCIIRQAssignment_zps24dd15fd.jpg
to no avail. And in "PCI-X Slot Information" only slot 6 is occupied, which
is the SCSI card.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...omputer/7PCI-XSlotInformation_zps62a0b031.jpg

It's been a long time since I looked at that stuff. I don't
know if I can help you with IRQ assignments. I seem to remember
needing to do something for Windows 98 with a sound card or
something. For modern OSes, you have "PNP OS" [yes or no] setting,
with [no] being normal for modern OSes. The BIOS then does the
resource assignment. You only need to move IRQ numbers, if
something isn't working right. The defaults would normally
be good enough I would think.

Some servers, you install a separate card in a special slot on
the motherboard, and that card allows remotely administering
the computer. That could be what the console redirection is
about. That allows a large number of servers to be administered
from a central location, hopefully without needing to enter
the server room.

And having your passwords cleared, is a relief.
The DELL 2600 PowerEdge motherboard features are as follows:

*** Six 64-bit PCI/PCI-X slots and one 32-bit slot. Slots accept full-length cards designed for 133 MHz, 100 MHz, 66 MHz, or 33 MHz.
*** An integrated VGA-compatible video subsystem with an ATI RAGE video controller. This video subsystem contains 8 MB of SDRAM video memory (nonupgradable). Maximum resolution is 1600 x 1200 x 16.7 million colors (noninterlaced).
*** An integrated, dual-channel Ultra320 SCSI host adapter.
*** Optional 1 x 2 backplane automatically configures the ID numbers and SCSI termination on individual hard drives, greatly simplifying drive installation.
*** One integrated 10/100/1000 NIC, which provides and Ethernet interface.
*** Embedded systems management circuitry that monitors operation of the system fans as well as critical system voltages and temperatures. The systems management circuitry works in conjunction with your systems management software.
*** Back-panel connectors including video, keyboard, mouse, two serial, one parallel, two USB, one NIC, and one optional embedded remote access Ethernet connector.

The service manual says that the supported operating systems are as follows:

Microsoft Windows 2000 Server family
Windows NT 4.0 Server family
Red Hat Linux 7.3 or later
Novell Netware 6.0

I assume this system came out before Windows XP I just wanted to
confirm that XP can be installed if needed.

Well, look for a WinXP driver for the SCSI controller you're currently
using. Since you also have an "embedded controller", the part number
on that would be another option. Or, use a Promise Ultra133 TX2, an
IDE driver, the Promise driver, a floppy diskette, and use the F6 method
to install a driver via floppy for that.

The RageXL graphics are ancient. ATI may have made drivers for
*server* versions of the OS (since ancient server graphics
like that get reused for a long time). There might not be a
reason to make a WinXP version. ATI would only stop selling
that chip, if the silicon fab could no longer make it. (Any time
a fab gets new lithography equipment, it usually means they can no
longer make the old designs. We "lost" all our chips at work on a
project once, because of that, and had to stop shipping our product.)
Also, If I can get this system up and running correctly would there
be any advantages of adding another processor? There is already a
single VRM chip, whatever that is. But I don't know if another VRM
chip would be needed if a second processor were added to the system.

VRM = voltage regulator module (plugs into ugly looking slot with big pins)
VRD = voltage regulator down (normal for retail motherboards, soldered down)

On old servers, a VRM is required per socket. VRMs are usually relatively
low power, compared to the capabilities of some VRDs now.

On some two socket motherboards, a "terminator adapter" plugs into the
second CPU socket, when no CPU is installed in there. That has something to
do with proper GTL bus termination. Missing that might cause a crash
immediately at boot.

A second CPU isn't going to materially affect your current problems.
And is just a waste of electricity and time :)

So the only thing I'd be concerned about, is whether that
particular motherboard needs a terminator in the second CPU
socket when it's empty or not.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...puter/1Processoramp4RamSticks_zps49f8849a.jpg

Also would there be any advantages to adding two more 1GB memory chips to bring the total to 6GB?

You've got enough RAM for the moment. You can dream about
this other stuff, when the box is running smoothly again.
(Outside of internet, DVD, MP3s, I may want to play around with
ram disks and video editing).

I have to look into a way to reattach the NVRAM battery so I
wouldn't have to keep entering the settings whenever I want to boot up.

You will need to learn to solder.

You could buy a CR2032 (assuming that is what fell out), and buy a pigtailed
version used in a laptop. That way, just cut off the two pin connector on the
end, strip the wires, and solder the wire ends to the two contact where the
socket for the battery used to be.

People have also used regular dry cells, anything that gives the
required 3V, and soldered that into the motherboard. (You would use
a battery holder from Radio Shack to hold the batteries in that case.)

If you want to do a proper repair, you'll need to find a battery
socket which is footprint compatible with the pattern already
present on the motherboard. Abusing a pigtailed battery is just
a lot simpler. If you want to "remove" the battery occasionally,
place a switch from Radio Shack (SPST or SPDT) in series with
one of the legs of the pigtailed battery, so you can interrupt
current flow when needed.
Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

So you were very close to booting :) Now the trick will be,
tracing down which irritating SCSI problem could be causing it.

"INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE Message After Changing a SCSI Adapter Resource"

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302098

"How to troubleshoot 'Stop error code 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE)'
error messages in Windows 2000"

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/822052

"Advanced troubleshooting for 'Stop error code 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE)'
errors in Windows XP" [ WinXP being similar enough to Win2K for debug purposes ]

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;324103

But what are the odds of someone leaving it in need of a CHKDSK run ?
The first procedure is encouraging (effectively resetting a registry
key used to keep track of what booted on the SCSI chain), but it's
pretty stupid in my opinion, when the ARC resource in boot.ini exists
to do something like that. To use the info in the first article,
you'd need a working computer, plug a SCSI controller into the machine,
then use regedit (or equivalent) to edit the registry hive on the
SCSI disk drive and delete the entries.

All these things are fixable. If you have a well equipped lab, that is.

I have some SCSI controllers here, and I could kludge something
together here to be able to read a drive like that from
my current PC. Then run CHKDSK, make a backup or whatever.

Paul
 
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J

jamesjaddah1755

(e-mail address removed) wrote:

[ Some answers inline... ]
Ok. I booted the DELL 2600 server about 60 times in an attempt to get back to the password screen (or past it).

I went into BIOS and under "Integrated Devices" changed "Embedded RAID Controller" from "Off" to "SCSI".
(The RAID option causes a warning that data will be lost).
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/1IntegratedDevices_zpsc498632d.jpg
So the SCSI setting was probably lost when the battery fell off.
This allows me to boot as far as the Windows 2000 Server splash screen:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/2Win2000Server_zps5bd0f4cc.jpg,
Followed by a "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg
(The blue screen tells me to run CHKDSK /F, but I don't know how to do that).
You would need to slave the SCSI drive to another computer.

**** I briefly plugged one of my SCSI controllers into my present and very flaky ITX system, but took it out before booting up. IT started doing weird/er things after that. Like prompting me to correct CPU settings in BIOS. (And something else I can't remember off hand). There is no way any kind of data can be exchanged between a SCSI card and a motherboard when the machine plugged in but not turned on, correct?

*** Either way, I just picked up a DELL 3000 someone threw out with the hopes of getting that going and using it instead of my extremely flaky ITX system to edit the registry on the SCSI drive, provided the onscreen instructions will be straight forward on how to do that. (But the DELL 3000 has it’s own issues I may have to start a thread about). I assume that I'd onlyhave to do this on the main "C" drive in the DELL 2600 as opposed to all four drives, correct? If I can get through that I assume that all I'd need to do then is reinstall the drive into the DELL 2600 and then add the SCSI driver.

Either that, or boot your WinXP installer CD to the recovery console,
and see if the CHKDSK works in there. You may need to press F6 and offer
a driver for the SCSI controller. I've never done that here, as
usually I'm working with IDE drives on the chipset. So look at the
ID of the chip or card controlling your SCSI drive, and locate a
driver for it for WinXP (if using the WinXP disc for the recovery
console).

*** I downloaded some drivers for the SCSI card in the DELL 2600 as well asa spare SCSI card I have just in case. Either way I'm sure it'll be trial and error getting the driver installed. Is this typically done via CD or floppy drive, or do I have a USB option?

-edit-
IBA GE Slot 8388 appears to be a LAN card boot option. You would
think that would appear regularly, unless there is not sufficient
low memory for the INT 0x13 support for LAN boot to load. Depending on
how many SCSI controllers are present, other boot ROMs might not
get to load, making the boot order listing "flaky" in behavior.

*** There is a single SCSI card. Or are you referring to something embedded? I wouldn't think that low memory would be any kind of issue in this system.

-edit-
(The other three hard drives don't show up in BIOS at all, but during
the boot-up sequence it show as each is spun up).
Could be staggered spin. For SCSI, there can be jumper blocks or dip switches
that enable staggered spin. Staggered spin is used to reduce the
strain on the power supply. One disk at a time, takes turns drawing the
2-3 amp spinup current. It reduces the peak current the power supply must
support. You could defeat the staggered spin, if you wanted the drives
to spin up in unison. If the power supply has a reasonably hefty 5V and 12V
current rating, it probably wouldn't be a big deal to spin them all
at once. I spin up five drives regularly here, on a 460W power supply,
without staggered spin or anything of that nature.

*** Well, since as I mentioned they are each spun up one after another I assume that is the "staggered" spin you are referring to.
I tried every combination I could think of in "PCI IRQ Assignment":
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/6PCIIRQAssignment_zps24dd15fd.jpg
to no avail. And in "PCI-X Slot Information" only slot 6 is occupied, which
is the SCSI card.
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...omputer/7PCI-XSlotInformation_zps62a0b031.jpg
It's been a long time since I looked at that stuff. I don't
know if I can help you with IRQ assignments. I seem to remember
needing to do something for Windows 98 with a sound card or
something. For modern OSes, you have "PNP OS" [yes or no] setting,
with [no] being normal for modern OSes. The BIOS then does the
resource assignment. You only need to move IRQ numbers, if
something isn't working right. The defaults would normally
be good enough I would think.

*** Well, since I tried every possible combination I assume that the IRQ couldn't be the problem.
Some servers, you install a separate card in a special slot on
the motherboard, and that card allows remotely administering
the computer. That could be what the console redirection is
about. That allows a large number of servers to be administered
from a central location, hopefully without needing to enter
the server room.

And having your passwords cleared, is a relief.

*** Yes, but I'm in a more difficult situation.

-edit-

Well, look for a WinXP driver for the SCSI controller you're currently
using. Since you also have an "embedded controller", the part number
on that would be another option. Or, use a Promise Ultra133 TX2, an
IDE driver, the Promise driver, a floppy diskette, and use the F6 method
to install a driver via floppy for that.

*** This is the driver page I found for the two SCSI cards I have:
DELL 2600: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/support/scsi/u160/asc-39160/
Spare: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/speed/scsi/windows/ph30s10rc1_exe.htm

*** Here’s another page for the SCSI in the DELL 2600: http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/driverdetails?driverid=5N7Y0


-edit-

A second CPU isn't going to materially affect your current problems.
And is just a waste of electricity and time :)

*** I was just looking ahead to some graphically intensive things I want todo.

So the only thing I'd be concerned about, is whether that
particular motherboard needs a terminator in the second CPU
socket when it's empty or not.

*** Obviously not. (Since I was able to get to the password screen before the CMOS battery came off).
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...puter/1Processoramp4RamSticks_zps49f8849a.jpg

Also would there be any advantages to adding two more 1GB memory chips tobring the total to 6GB?
You've got enough RAM for the moment. You can dream about
this other stuff, when the box is running smoothly again.

*** Just thinking about the ram disks I'll be experimenting with. :)

-edit-

So you were very close to booting :) Now the trick will be,
tracing down which irritating SCSI problem could be causing it.

"INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE Message After Changing a SCSI Adapter Resource"

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/302098

"How to troubleshoot 'Stop error code 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE)'
error messages in Windows 2000"

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/822052

"Advanced troubleshooting for 'Stop error code 0x0000007B (INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE)'
errors in Windows XP" [ WinXP being similar enough to Win2K for debug purposes ]

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;324103

But what are the odds of someone leaving it in need of a CHKDSK run ?
The first procedure is encouraging (effectively resetting a registry
key used to keep track of what booted on the SCSI chain), but it's
pretty stupid in my opinion, when the ARC resource in boot.ini exists
to do something like that. To use the info in the first article,
you'd need a working computer, plug a SCSI controller into the machine,
then use regedit (or equivalent) to edit the registry hive on the
SCSI disk drive and delete the entries.

All these things are fixable. If you have a well equipped lab, that is.

I have some SCSI controllers here, and I could kludge something
together here to be able to read a drive like that from
my current PC. Then run CHKDSK, make a backup or whatever.

Paul

*** I only wish this was as easy as starting from scratch and reformatting the main drive, installing Windows XP, and then adding needed drivers.


Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

**** I briefly plugged one of my SCSI controllers into my present
and very flaky ITX system, but took it out before booting up. IT
started doing weird/er things after that. Like prompting me to
correct CPU settings in BIOS. (And something else I can't remember
off hand). There is no way any kind of data can be exchanged between
a SCSI card and a motherboard when the machine plugged in but not
turned on, correct?

You would hope that slot keying would have prevented
a voltage problem with the card types. Desktops
typically run the PCI slot off 5V, whereas 64 bit (long slot)
PCI can use 3.3V for power. While there are some Adaptec
dual power SCSI cards (universal, can run at either
voltage), some of the others are 3.3V only. The slot
key is supposed to prevent illegal card combinations.
The mini-ITX should have a "key" or bump in the slot,
that prevents card insertion of the wrong types.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PCI_Keying.png

You have to be fairly careful when mixing cards between
servers and desktops, and I would not have even attempted
an insertion.

My SCSI cards here are:

1) Low performance. 40MB/sec or 80MB/sec. No 160MB/sec or
320MB/sec cards, because the slot type on the
edge of the card can't do more than about 110MB/sec
on the card types I use.

2) PCI 32 bit (short slot) 33MHz (desktop clock speed) cards.
My cards won't fit in a server (with the exception of the
lone 32/33 slot some of them have).

While I do have a minimal collection of SCSI cables,
I can't claim to be able to "slave up any SCSI drive on
demand". Back in the day, I was paying $50 to $100 for
some kinds of SCSI cables, which is a deterrent to going crazy
with the stuff. I have a couple teflon ribbons, and
some external cabling for two SCSI enclosures I've got.
Plus a collection of cables for connecting my SCSI scanner
to various hardware (PC or Mac). The scanner was async
SCSI, and transferred at 1 to 2MB/sec.
*** Either way, I just picked up a DELL 3000 someone threw out
with the hopes of getting that going and using it instead of my
extremely flaky ITX system to edit the registry on the SCSI drive,
provided the onscreen instructions will be straight forward on
how to do that. (But the DELL 3000 has it’s own issues I may have
to start a thread about). I assume that I'd only have to do this
on the main "C" drive in the DELL 2600 as opposed to all four drives,
correct? If I can get through that I assume that all I'd need to
do then is reinstall the drive into the DELL 2600 and then add the
SCSI driver.

I've lost track of why we're editing the registry :)

The Registry is only on the C: partition, on the boot drive.

The last thing I remember, is an inaccessible boot volume. We
assume the thing used to work, meaning the Win2K had a driver
for SCSI in it, and it was just a matter of programming the
BIOS correctly, same modes as before, so the Win2K could boot
with the drivers it's got. It's doubtful the person would
have run it (somehow), with not all the drives accessible.

Some of these systems can have a SCSI chain on the motherboard,
which is the "embedded" interface. For example, my first PC compatible
desktop had SCSI (P2B-S), and it had its own SCSI chip soldered
to the motherboard. You can then add SCSI cards to PC slots,
if you want to build additional SCSI chains.

When you first got the machine, I presume the cabling connected
the intended controller card (driver included), to the Windows
boot drive. It wouldn't make a lot of sense, if the machine was
just pulled out of service and sold, to be fouling up the
configuration from a hardware perspective. Usually if a seller
is going to be doing that, they "gut" the hardware and remove
anything of interest. Meaning, there wouldn't have even been a SCSI
PCI-X card in it. Your machine appears to have shipped to
you, ready to go, which is why I'm assuming what it needs
is appropriate BIOS settings.

The CHKDSK idea, was to try to make sure the partitions
are still OK.
*** I downloaded some drivers for the SCSI card in the DELL 2600
as well as a spare SCSI card I have just in case. Either way I'm
sure it'll be trial and error getting the driver installed. Is
this typically done via CD or floppy drive, or do I have a USB option?

On WinXP, you prepare a driver that includes a TXTSETUP.OEM file
plus driver folders, on a floppy. Then, press F6 during the
installation, and WinXP will attempt to access the floppy.

The second alternative, is to slipstream the drivers (TXTSETUP.OEM
and folders), into a new WinXP installer CD. Then you don't
have to press F6, and the installation is as simple as installing
to a desktop IDE ribbon cable drive.

I would do the slipstream myself. That's for cases where
modern machines no longer have a floppy connector, and you
can't buy any USB floppy drives. It's just easier to make
a custom installer CD.

(Second button labeled "Integrate drivers"...)
http://www.nliteos.com/guide/part1.html
*** There is a single SCSI card. Or are you referring to something
embedded? I wouldn't think that low memory would be any kind of issue
in this system.

You would look on the motherboard surface, for a SCSI connector.
I think my P2B-S had a ribbon cable connector for plugging in
a teflon ribbon cable. It would be a different size than an
IDE cable on a desktop. Just going from memory, SCSI was 50 pin
or 68 pin. So a SCSI motherboard connector would be
a bigger one.

My reference to "low memory" is this. When PCs came out, they lived
in a "640KB world". The BIOS still lives in that world, for whatever
the first operating mode of the CPU is. The code switches modes
at some point, and after that, all memory becomes available. Of the
640K, BIOS drivers for plugin cards fit in a subsection of that
memory, perhaps 128KB on a desktop (256KB on a server). If a
computer runs out of that tiny, fixed allocation of memory,
as defined by the architecture, then the last card(s) cannot
load BIOS drivers, and then the card is not a boot candidate.
The code that is loading, is Extended INT 0x13 disk read code,
coming from the BIOS chip soldered to the disk controller card.
Your SCSI card should have a chip with such code in it. If the
128KB low memory region is "full", then the last cards, the BIOS
doesn't bother to load their boot code. The result can be
some drives not showing up as boot options. A tech will
juggle the order of cards in PCI slots, putting the
boot card "closer to the processor", and any data drive
controlling cards further away from the processor, in
an attempt to get the BIOS drivers to load.

Once the OS is loaded, there is plenty of memory,
drivers load for everything, and all disks are
accessible. It's just a short time in the BIOS,
where the BIOS can't boot from stuff where it
can't load the INT 0x13 BIOS driver for it.

I'm not suggesting you start moving cards around,
because I seriously doubt you're running out of
low memory. That kind of thing happens when users
have three or four disk controller cards plugged into
the PCI slots. You have a minimal hardware configuration.
There should be enough "low memory".
*** Well, since as I mentioned they are each spun up one after another
I assume that is the "staggered" spin you are referring to.

It's possible. SCSI drives can have jumper blocks, as well as
a set of DIP switches, and back when I was using SCSI, it was
always a challenge to get a doc with the details. I wouldn't
change anything just yet. You could turn off staggered spin,
but there can be other reasons the drives don't show.

OK, so I mentioned the SCSI controller card has a BIOS chip on it.
It has a driver the BIOS uses to do read operations on the card.

But that BIOS chip also supports a BIOS setup screen. When you
press the appropriate control key sequence early enough in
BIOS post, the SCSI card code loads and a setup screen for
the SCSI card appears. And in that screen, you can see
the other hard drives.

You would need to find a manual for the SCSI controller
card, to figure out what key combination to press. It
might be "<control>-S" for example. Cards can use
different key sequences (like control-I for Intel RAID),
and they use different keys so a user can access the
card of their choice. You can have multiple cards
with private collections of hard drives, so a
few different letters can be "on the go".

OK, on page 24 of this 39160 manual, it says to press <control>-A.
Do that early in POST, and the BIOS screen for the SCSI card
should show up. I can't tell you what will show up there, but
you might see evidence of the staggered drives in there.
So this is something new for you to work on. Blame me
for forgetting this :)

http://download.adaptec.com/pdfs/user_guides/39160_users_reference.pdf
I tried every combination I could think of in "PCI IRQ Assignment":
*** Well, since I tried every possible combination I assume that
the IRQ couldn't be the problem.


*** Yes, but I'm in a more difficult situation.

-edit-


*** This is the driver page I found for the two SCSI cards I have:
DELL 2600: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/support/scsi/u160/asc-39160/
Spare: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/speed/scsi/windows/ph30s10rc1_exe.htm

*** Here’s another page for the SCSI in the DELL 2600:
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/driverdetails?driverid=5N7Y0

If I download the Dell file in your example...

http://downloads.dell.com/scsi-non-raid/R155692.EXE

and open it in 7ZIP, I can see that is a TXTSETUP.OEM style
driver. You copy the seven files to a floppy, if installing
WinXP. Or, you offer the seven files to NLite, when
"integrating drivers". If you make a custom installer
CD using that SCSI driver, then there would be no need
to press F6, or use a floppy.
*** I only wish this was as easy as starting from scratch and reformatting
the main drive, installing Windows XP, and then adding needed drivers.

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

I think "easy", isn't quite the right word for this project.

Working with servers, is a different beast. I learned a bit
about some server stuff, by reading threads over on 2cpu.com
forums. I never posted over there, but did read various
threads from people who run servers (dual CPU systems)
in their home.

I would be hard-pressed to get your system up and running.
And trying to guess what controls to adjust in the BIOS,
when I can't get my hands on the machine, makes it
doubly difficult to suggest what to do.

Paul
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:23:29 AM UTC-5, Paul wrote:
You have to be fairly careful when mixing cards between
servers and desktops, and I would not have even attempted
an insertion.

*** I didn't. The Ultra2 LVD/SE SCSI card I used was from my first pc about15 years ago, which was a SCSI desktop. The SCSI card in the DELL 2600 is an Adaptec 39160 that I've not taken out. (Yet). But I assume that this card is only for the tape drive, since that is the only hardware the card is cabled to.

I've lost track of why we're editing the registry :)

*** To re-cap. Thanks to the CMOS battery holder falling off I lost the settings and as a result I can only get as far as the "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg
(I have to keep switching to the SCSI setting in BIOS "Integrated Devices" on every boot-up just to get that far).

The Registry is only on the C: partition, on the boot drive.

The last thing I remember, is an inaccessible boot volume. We
assume the thing used to work, meaning the Win2K had a driver
for SCSI in it, and it was just a matter of programming the
BIOS correctly, same modes as before, so the Win2K could boot
with the drivers it's got. It's doubtful the person would
have run it (somehow), with not all the drives accessible.

*** There are five SCSI drives total leaving a single empty bay. They can all be easily pulled out of their bays. Nevertheless, the system and all drives where working when I first picked it up.

Some of these systems can have a SCSI chain on the motherboard,
which is the "embedded" interface. For example, my first PC compatible
desktop had SCSI (P2B-S), and it had its own SCSI chip soldered
to the motherboard. You can then add SCSI cards to PC slots,
if you want to build additional SCSI chains.

*** I think I saw "SCSI" silk-screened somewhere on the motherboard somewhere. I do know that there is a 128mb RAID DIMM in a single dedicated socket.Nevertheless, there is the "SCSI backplane daughtercard with a Qlogic controller”. ( http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...omputer/DELLServerMysteryCard_zpse60859d4.jpg ). Si I assume that SCSI is embedded on this motherboard.

When you first got the machine, I presume the cabling connected
the intended controller card (driver included), to the Windows
boot drive. It wouldn't make a lot of sense, if the machine was
just pulled out of service and sold, to be fouling up the
configuration from a hardware perspective. Usually if a seller
is going to be doing that, they "gut" the hardware and remove
anything of interest. Meaning, there wouldn't have even been a SCSI
PCI-X card in it. Your machine appears to have shipped to
you, ready to go, which is why I'm assuming what it needs
is appropriate BIOS settings.

*** Before the battery holder broke of I could only get as far as the Windows 2000 Server password screen, which is why I was attempting to remove thebattery in the first place. And there was no SCSI cabling connected to anyof the five SCSI drives from the SCSI card installed.

The CHKDSK idea, was to try to make sure the partitions
are still OK.

*** I doubt that is an issue.
*** I downloaded some drivers for the SCSI card in the DELL 2600
as well as a spare SCSI card I have just in case. Either way I'm
sure it'll be trial and error getting the driver installed. Is
this typically done via CD or floppy drive, or do I have a USB option?
On WinXP, you prepare a driver that includes a TXTSETUP.OEM file
plus driver folders, on a floppy. Then, press F6 during the
installation, and WinXP will attempt to access the floppy.

*** I'm not sure what you mean by "plus driver folders", but shouldn't I just try to get this working with the already installed Windows 2000 Server?

The second alternative, is to slipstream the drivers (TXTSETUP.OEM
and folders), into a new WinXP installer CD. Then you don't
have to press F6, and the installation is as simple as installing
to a desktop IDE ribbon cable drive.

I would do the slipstream myself. That's for cases where
modern machines no longer have a floppy connector, and you
can't buy any USB floppy drives. It's just easier to make
a custom installer CD.

*** Ok, it has a floppy drive, so I'll go that route. (I can't burn a CD anyway). But again the machine presently has Windows Server 2000 installed. (I want to eventually erase that and install Windows XP.).

*** And where do I get the TXTSETUP.OEM file? And once I put it on a floppydisk, do I press F6 during boot up with Win 2000 still installed or is this something that is done when I am installing Win XP? (Or does all this have to be done by slaving the SCSI boot drive to another system when I attempt to edit the drive's registry? (Provided I can get another system up and running correctly to allow this).

(Second button labeled "Integrate drivers"...)
http://www.nliteos.com/guide/part1.html
*** There is a single SCSI card. Or are you referring to something
embedded? I wouldn't think that low memory would be any kind of issue
in this system.
You would look on the motherboard surface, for a SCSI connector.
I think my P2B-S had a ribbon cable connector for plugging in
a teflon ribbon cable. It would be a different size than an
IDE cable on a desktop. Just going from memory, SCSI was 50 pin
or 68 pin. So a SCSI motherboard connector would be
a bigger one.

*** Outside of all but one PCI slot two memory slots and the VRM connector (for the chip for a 2nd processor), the only slot left unoccupied is something that says "ERA card".

*** The only ribbon cables are that from the SCSI card that is located in the only occupied PCI slot. It is connected to the Tape drive. And there is a 60(?) pin cable that goes from the motherboard to the CD/Floppy drive assembly.
*** Well, since as I mentioned they are each spun up one after another
I assume that is the "staggered" spin you are referring to.
It's possible. SCSI drives can have jumper blocks, as well as
a set of DIP switches, and back when I was using SCSI, it was
always a challenge to get a doc with the details. I wouldn't
change anything just yet. You could turn off staggered spin,
but there can be other reasons the drives don't show.

*** I guess the best thing to do is to first concentrate on getting to the desktop. (With either 2000 or XP installed on the boot drive). And then I'll get to the issue of whether or not the other drives are shown in BIOS. (But again, when booting I watch as each of the five SCSI drives spin up independently. The first is the Seagate as shown here: http://i290.photobucket..com/albums...Computer/InvalidConfiguration_zps068ebb4c.jpg)

OK, on page 24 of this 39160 manual, it says to press <control>-A.
Do that early in POST, and the BIOS screen for the SCSI card
should show up. I can't tell you what will show up there, but
you might see evidence of the staggered drives in there.
So this is something new for you to work on. Blame me
for forgetting this :)

http://download.adaptec.com/pdfs/user_guides/39160_users_reference.pdf

*** I did press CTRL+A and got the following screen:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/SCSISetupUtility_zpseb1a9d95.jpg

*** Of the two options I clicked the one that had the number "68" under "Dev/Func" and got this screen:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...SetupUtility-DeviceProperties_zps3dd59597.jpg

*** I clicked on the highlighted "Device Properties" and got the following:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...etupUtility-SeagateampFujitsu_zps32577e07.jpg

*** But if I instead clicked on the earlier option where the number "69" was located under "Dev/Func":
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...etupUtility-DeviceProperties2_zpsc05561c3.jpg

*** And then clicked "Device Properties" I get what looks like three IBM drive instead of my one IBM and two Hitachi drives:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...ISetupUtility-IBMampHitachix2_zps91fdb9c0.jpg
*** This is the driver page I found for the two SCSI cards I have:
DELL 2600: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/support/scsi/u160/asc-39160/
Spare: http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/speed/scsi/windows/ph30s10rc1_exe.htm

*** Here’s another page for the SCSI in the DELL 2600:
http://www.dell.com/support/drivers/us/en/19/driverdetails?driverid=5N7Y0
If I download the Dell file in your example...

http://downloads.dell.com/scsi-non-raid/R155692.EXE

and open it in 7ZIP, I can see that is a TXTSETUP.OEM style
driver. You copy the seven files to a floppy, if installing
WinXP. Or, you offer the seven files to NLite, when
"integrating drivers". If you make a custom installer
CD using that SCSI driver, then there would be no need
to press F6, or use a floppy.

*** I don't know what NLite is or "what you mean by ""integrating drivers",but to try and simplify things, I need something called “TXTSETUP.OEM”.. Do I need to find the driver for the boot drive?

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul


I don't think this article is exhaustive,
but it mentions a few reasons for that error (0x7B)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324103

A blog page, mentioned a user cloning C:, then attempting
to boot from the clone, and being met with that error.
And the suggestion there, was effectively to review boot.ini
and see if it was correct for the situation or not. The ARC path
may need to be edited.

What I can't come up with a recipe for, is how you go about
analyzing a computer, to figure out the boot process it *used*
to use. If your machine has more than one OS loaded, then
you have to watch for that as an issue. While a particular
SCSI BIOS boot choice may look like it's booting the official
boot volume, it might be picking up a boot off a different disk.
And perhaps the ARC for that different disk, isn't set up right.

If I was working on the machine, I'd need some OS to have
a look around, and understand what is stored on the disks.
To see if that SCSI Boot order needs to be changed. I don't
even know where the SCSI BIOS stores the boot choice, like
in CMOS RAM or somewhere else.

Linux is an example of an OS that might work. It would also
allow you to examine the files on the partition, and get some
idea whether the files are accessible.

I presume with SCSI, more than one field in the ARC in the
boot.ini, is engaged. If you have more than one SCSI chain,
then there could be multiple fields that make
a difference when editing the boot.ini. (The four numbers
in the disk path.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTLDR#boot.ini

In your SCSI pictures, it looks like there are two chains,
and the boot screen is likely the critical one in terms of
selecting one to boot from. If there is only one OS on there,
the boot order should help find it.

Have you ever booted that machine from a CD ? Does that work ?
Maybe a Linux LiveCD would work. The latest Ubuntu probably
wouldn't be any fun. But 11.04, I booted it in a VM and
it still has the menus that make it easier to use.

http://old-releases.ubuntu.com/releases/

Doing System : Administration : Gparted, shows the partitions
on the disks. Without resorting to command line stuff
from the Terminal.

To work on the machine from a Windows CD Recovery Console,
you'd need a driver for SCSI. The CDs do have some stuff
and night pick up your SCSI chains. The same is true of Linux,
the Livecd should have quite a few drivers. Otherwise it would
be pretty useless as a livecd.

The problem with the Recovery Console on a Windows install CD, is
it's going to ask for the Administrator password when "logging in"
to the OS partition. Otherwise, if you could get there, a thing to
repair boot.ini is

bootcfg /rebuild

As you can see here, that option doesn't always work,
which is why at this point I'd still be surveying the machine for
info I could use, as well as editing boot.ini by hand.

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...-bootini/754aed00-f74c-e011-8dfc-68b599b31bf5

It must have a driver for the disk. Which makes it harder to
understand the 0x7B error. The partitions probably aren't
corrupted. And my Linux LiveCD would allow me to have a look
around.

Here's another reference:

http://www.dell.com/support/trouble...IframeView?docid=DSN_356576&doclang=EN#Issue5

"If you have inadvertently erased or tinkered with the boot.ini
file, you may receive stop code 0x7B during the startup process.
Launch the recovery console from the Windows installation disc
and run BOOTCFG /REBUILD"

HTH,
Paul
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

Now that I've recovered from DELL burnout I'm back to this system. Things were becoming confusing it seemed on both sides, so I condensed everything to the important points.

The computer booted as far as the Windows Server 2000 password screen. WhenI attempted to remove the CMOS battery the battery holder came off the motherboard. As a result I got "No Boot Device" when I attempted to boot up because my settings were cleared. Pressing the battery back down during boot-up gave me "Invalid Configuration". So the determination was that I now need SCSI drivers for the SCSI card. (But what about the SCSI hard drives?). The single Adaptec SCSI 39160 SCSI card in the only occupied slot (#6) has asingle (70 pin?) ribbon cable connecting it to the DAT72 Tape Drive. It isNOT connected to anything else.

The DELL PowerEdge Server apparently has SCSI embedded because it has a SCSI backplane daughter-card with Qlogic controller and 5 of the 6 bays have SCSI hard drives.(The manual states that the DELL has an integrated, dual-channel Ultra320 SCSI host adaptor).

And there is a single 60 pin ribbon running from the motherboard to the TEAC CD-224E (CD/Floppy combo).

I have the option of adding 2Gb more memory to the present 4Gb installed, and adding a second processor (along with VRM chip). There is a 128Mb RAID DIMM, and a slot for and "ERA card". But I can't seem to find a model numberfor the motherboard: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/DELL2600Motherboard_zps58be62de.jpg

The PCI slots are as follows:
Two 64-bit/133MHz PCI-X
Four 64-bit/100MHz PCI-X
One 32-bit/33MHz PCI

The hardware is as follows:
* Adaptec 39160 SCSI Card
* TEAC - CD-224E CD/Floppy
* DAT72 - CD72LWH Tape Drive
* Seagate Cheetah: ST336607LC (Boot Drive)
* Fujitsu Limited: MAW3073NC
* Hitachi Ultrastar: IC35L073UCDY10-0
* Hitachi Ultrastar: IC35L073UCDY10-0
* IBM Total Storage: IC35L073UCDY10-0

When booting up the screen will show each drive booting up consecutively and not all at the same time. (But three of those five hard drives don't showup in BIOS at all). ?!?

Anyway, I now have to go into BIOS and under "Integrated Devices" chang "Embedded RAID Controller" from "Off" to "SCSI". (The "RAID" option causes a warning that data will be lost). http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/1IntegratedDevices_zpsc498632d.jpg

This allows me to boot as far as the Windows 2000 Server splash screen: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/2Win2000Server_zps5bd0f4cc.jpg,
Followed by a "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg (The blue screen tells me to run CHKDSK /F, but I'm not worried about that).

I'm going to have to use the floppy drive and F6 to install whatever drivers I need to.

Now, outside of needing drivers for the Adaptec SCSI card, since I want to discard the Windows Server 2000 install on the boot drive and install Windows XP instead, do I need an Windows XP SCSI driver for just the "C" drive or all hard drives?

Btw. I picked up these for when I attempt to add an IDE drive to the final bay:
www.ebay.com/itm/261471967525 (Of course SATA is not an option with this).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
Ad

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P

Paul

Now that I've recovered from DELL burnout I'm back to this system. Things were becoming confusing it seemed on both sides, so I condensed everything to the important points.

The computer booted as far as the Windows Server 2000 password screen. When I attempted to remove the CMOS battery the battery holder came off the motherboard. As a result I got "No Boot Device" when I attempted to boot up because my settings were cleared. Pressing the battery back down during boot-up gave me "Invalid Configuration". So the determination was that I now need SCSI drivers for the SCSI card. (But what about the SCSI hard drives?). The single Adaptec SCSI 39160 SCSI card in the only occupied slot (#6) has a single (70 pin?) ribbon cable connecting it to the DAT72 Tape Drive. It is NOT connected to anything else.

The DELL PowerEdge Server apparently has SCSI embedded because it has a SCSI backplane daughter-card with Qlogic controller and 5 of the 6 bays have SCSI hard drives.(The manual states that the DELL has an integrated, dual-channel Ultra320 SCSI host adaptor).

And there is a single 60 pin ribbon running from the motherboard to the TEAC CD-224E (CD/Floppy combo).

I have the option of adding 2Gb more memory to the present 4Gb installed, and adding a second processor (along with VRM chip). There is a 128Mb RAID DIMM, and a slot for and "ERA card". But I can't seem to find a model number for the motherboard: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/DELL2600Motherboard_zps58be62de.jpg

The PCI slots are as follows:
Two 64-bit/133MHz PCI-X
Four 64-bit/100MHz PCI-X
One 32-bit/33MHz PCI

The hardware is as follows:
* Adaptec 39160 SCSI Card
* TEAC - CD-224E CD/Floppy
* DAT72 - CD72LWH Tape Drive
* Seagate Cheetah: ST336607LC (Boot Drive)
* Fujitsu Limited: MAW3073NC
* Hitachi Ultrastar: IC35L073UCDY10-0
* Hitachi Ultrastar: IC35L073UCDY10-0
* IBM Total Storage: IC35L073UCDY10-0

When booting up the screen will show each drive booting up consecutively and not all at the same time. (But three of those five hard drives don't show up in BIOS at all). ?!?

Anyway, I now have to go into BIOS and under "Integrated Devices" chang "Embedded RAID Controller" from "Off" to "SCSI". (The "RAID" option causes a warning that data will be lost). http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/1IntegratedDevices_zpsc498632d.jpg

This allows me to boot as far as the Windows 2000 Server splash screen: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/2Win2000Server_zps5bd0f4cc.jpg,
Followed by a "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past: http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg (The blue screen tells me to run CHKDSK /F, but I'm not worried about that).

I'm going to have to use the floppy drive and F6 to install whatever drivers I need to.

Now, outside of needing drivers for the Adaptec SCSI card, since I want to discard the Windows Server 2000 install on the boot drive and install Windows XP instead, do I need an Windows XP SCSI driver for just the "C" drive or all hard drives?

Btw. I picked up these for when I attempt to add an IDE drive to the final bay:
www.ebay.com/itm/261471967525 (Of course SATA is not an option with this).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

As discussed before, there are a couple possibilities.

1) The machine has all the drivers it needs. But, the
disk addressing in boot.ini is screwed up (ARC path).
You either need to use repair console, and use whatever
rebuilds a boot.ini for you. Or, you open the boot.ini file
and edit it by hand.

Possible tools:

a) Win2K Server installer CD - the installer CD should
give you a recovery console (MSDOS prompt) to work from.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/317521

bootcfg /rebuild

I've never used Win2K Server, so can't really help
much more than that.

b) Boot with a Windows 7 or Windows 8 DVD, which also
have recovery console. The difference here, is the
"diskpart" utility might be able to enumerate the
drives in the order the hardware sees them in now.
That would give a hint if you wanted to correct the
boot.ini by hand.

c) A Linux LiveCD should be able to probe all the
storage busses as well. But I don't know if the
naming convention they use, would absolutely nail
the Windows order.

If the machine doesn't have the drivers, you look
to see if the Southbridge IDE connector is available.
The OS may be able to boot from that. It would mean
transferring the disk contents with DD via Linux LiveCD,
to a blank IDE drive connected to the ribbon cable.
Other possibilities would be a Macrium backup software
boot CD, or an Acronis backup boot CD, and do the disk
to disk transfer with tools like that (instead of using
Linux Disk Dump).

I think the bootcfg /rebuild is marginally easier.

The Linux LiveCD should also allow you to examine
all the FAT32 and NTFS partitions, so you can be
assured everything you need is still there.

*******

When working with a boot.ini, you want to keep a
backup copy. So if someone wants to know later
"what was the file like originally", you have a copy.

C:
ren boot.ini boot.ini.bak
bootcfg /rebuild

Paul
 
J

jamesjaddah1755

As discussed before, there are a couple possibilities.



1) The machine has all the drivers it needs. But, the

disk addressing in boot.ini is screwed up (ARC path).

You either need to use repair console, and use whatever

rebuilds a boot.ini for you. Or, you open the boot.ini file

and edit it by hand.



Possible tools:



a) Win2K Server installer CD - the installer CD should

give you a recovery console (MSDOS prompt) to work from.



http://support.microsoft.com/kb/317521



bootcfg /rebuild



I've never used Win2K Server, so can't really help

much more than that.



b) Boot with a Windows 7 or Windows 8 DVD, which also

have recovery console. The difference here, is the

"diskpart" utility might be able to enumerate the

drives in the order the hardware sees them in now.

That would give a hint if you wanted to correct the

boot.ini by hand.



c) A Linux LiveCD should be able to probe all the

storage busses as well. But I don't know if the

naming convention they use, would absolutely nail

the Windows order.



If the machine doesn't have the drivers, you look

to see if the Southbridge IDE connector is available.

The OS may be able to boot from that. It would mean

transferring the disk contents with DD via Linux LiveCD,

to a blank IDE drive connected to the ribbon cable.

Other possibilities would be a Macrium backup software

boot CD, or an Acronis backup boot CD, and do the disk

to disk transfer with tools like that (instead of using

Linux Disk Dump).



I think the bootcfg /rebuild is marginally easier.



The Linux LiveCD should also allow you to examine

all the FAT32 and NTFS partitions, so you can be

assured everything you need is still there.



*******



When working with a boot.ini, you want to keep a

backup copy. So if someone wants to know later

"what was the file like originally", you have a copy.



C:

ren boot.ini boot.ini.bak

bootcfg /rebuild



Paul

There is no IDE connector on the motherboard. But I'm trying to figure out why would losing the battery erase the drivers? Is that normal? And if theyare erased I can only assume that all drives, the SCSI card, and the motherboard would need new ones.

What I don't understand is that this machine was originally put together somehow. Why a server can't be made to work using just installation disks with an operating system and necessary drivers is beyond me.

You seem to be saying that Win2K server, Win 7, Win 8, or possibly a Linux Live CD are my only options. I have none of those disks and I'm not a computer expert, so trying to figure out all of the steps in using those is not an option for me. Though you haven't come right out and said it you not mentioning XP seems to indicate that XP is not an option for me. It looks as though this would have to go in the trash like the several other problem computers I just threw out.

Maybe I can just salvage the drives for another SCSI system since I have a couple now that I can plug SCSI cards into, and I assume all I'd need to dois find drivers for the SCSI card and any SCSI drive. (And maybe the latest motherboard drivers).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.
 
P

Paul

There is no IDE connector on the motherboard. But I'm trying to figure out why would losing the battery erase the drivers? Is that normal? And if they are erased I can only assume that all drives, the SCSI card, and the motherboard would need new ones.

What I don't understand is that this machine was originally put together somehow. Why a server can't be made to work using just installation disks with an operating system and necessary drivers is beyond me.

You seem to be saying that Win2K server, Win 7, Win 8, or possibly a Linux Live CD are my only options. I have none of those disks and I'm not a computer expert, so trying to figure out all of the steps in using those is not an option for me. Though you haven't come right out and said it you not mentioning XP seems to indicate that XP is not an option for me. It looks as though this would have to go in the trash like the several other problem computers I just threw out.

Maybe I can just salvage the drives for another SCSI system since I have a couple now that I can plug SCSI cards into, and I assume all I'd need to do is find drivers for the SCSI card and any SCSI drive. (And maybe the latest motherboard drivers).

Thanks.

Darren Harris
Staten Island, New York.

You're forgetting that I'm not an expert either.
I try to pass along the things I've tried, or
more often, the things I've read about.

To maintain a computer, you need a certain amount of
materials. For example, if you pop the hood on your
car, chances are you keep a greasy rag handy, to
wipe off the dipstick. Or wipe the grease off your
hands.

Things like OS disks with recovery console on them,
are like that greasy rag. Sooner or later, you're
going to need them.

You have the option of taking the machine to
Geek Squad, and if they have an OS CD (they will),
they can administer commands to fix "Inaccessible
Boot Volume".

When the BIOS lost its settings, there could now be
different peripheral cards turned on than before. This
can change the "numbering" of disks and SCSI busses
and the like. When I recommend bootcfg /rebuild,
it's in the belief that all the drivers are present,
and just the numbering is screwed up.

That's all I'm suggesting.

I don't have any Win2K Server discs here, and I
don't know where I'd go looking for them.

As a non-expert, I would likely start by finding
something I can boot, to be able to edit content
on the disk. I want to edit that boot.ini. I need
something to use to do that. I have a large collection
(a foot high), of things used to boot computers.
Most of them are crap. Only a few are worth having.
And each repair person has their own favorites, which
support their own approach to problem solving.

*******

Only in a few cases, will I be able to collect enough
information from you, to give a precise recipe that
works every time.

Many other times, I will have some ideas of things
I'd want to look at. A machine that used to run,
and now doesn't run, and all that happened is the
battery flopped on the floor, there aren't really
a lot of possibilities as to what broke. Considering
all the BIOS settings that affect the storage cards,
do you think you could systematically enable and
disable those, until Win2K Server managed to finish
the boot ? That's one approach.

I've actually done that kind of thing with Knoppix LiveCDs.
Knoppix starts booting just fine from the CD. And then
it stops, saying "it can't find the drive". Then, you
have to guess which /dev/sdg2 type device identifier
you can add to the command line, to get the damn thing
to boot. It's taken me a half hour on occasion, to get
that crap to work. So even I, occasionally, succumb to
the brute force solution path. Which is to guess at
a device numbering issue, to get an OS to boot. The boot
process uses BIOS Extended INT 0x13. But the instant
the desktop tries to appear, the OS switches to the
OS driver instead, and that's what is giving the
Inaccessible Boot Device.

The bootcfg /rebuild attempts to use the info the
recovery console can see, to be used to correct the
contents of boot.ini. But you should back up
boot.ini, in case that command screws up.

*******

In terms of whether you should throw away the machine,
that depends on whether it's too hard to maintain or not.
I've had SCSI platforms before - for example, my desktop
used SCSI at work. I've spent half the day trying to
tame the SCSI bus on that damn thing (mixing 16 bit and
8 bit drives, autoterminators, manual terminators), to make
the thing work. It took me a few combinations before I figured
out something that wouldn't "fall over" on me. SCSI is loads
of fun. IDE/SATA is easy by comparison. SCSI is also expensive.
I have some cables here, that were costing me $50 to $100 a piece.
Which makes connecting up a new hard drive, rather expensive.
I have one computer here, that had five or six SCSI drives
on it, using both internal bus and external micro 68 pin cabling.
It was stable, not a lot of drama, but still expensive. External
disk enclosures were expensive, and so were those large round
cables it needed.

Paul
 
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F

Flasherly

I now have to go into BIOS and under "Integrated Devices" chang
"Embedded RAID Controller" from "Off" to "SCSI". (The "RAID" option
causes a warning that data will be lost).
This allows me to boot as far as the Windows 2000 Server splash
screen:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll257/Statenislander/Computer/2Win2000Server_zps5bd0f4cc.jpg,by a "Inaccessible Boot Device" blue screen which I can't get past:
http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/...mputer/3InaccesibleBootDevice_zps9b47479a.jpg
(The blue screen tells me to run CHKDSK /F, but I'm not worried about
that).going to have to use the floppy drive and F6 to install whatever
drivers I need to.outside of needing drivers for the Adaptec SCSI card, since I want to
discard the Windows Server 2000 install on the boot drive and install
Windows XP instead, do I need an Windows XP SCSI driver for just the
"C" drive or all hard drives?

--
Looks like your drivers at the bottom link. The controller card
(Adaptec) drivers take to relate to Windows what's connected, and
Windows takes over from there...XP should show storage media
(HD's/floppies/CD-DVD/whatever is physically attached to the
controller) as available.

Yea...I wouldn't wanna screw with a corporate NT-setup box being
farmed out for peanuts or parts.

(It's like $10 on sale for a decent new PCI SATA controller, dual port
maybe external SATA port out "via pin- internal disable one port," on
NewEgg. Maybe the BIOS will provide for a boot, maybe not. On down
the road, or as long as you're flush with SCSI drives...cool;- if not,
they're not going to be near as easily to replace as P/SATA storage
media & bi-directional converters if need be - $6 shipped in from
China off Ebay, provided the extra room at end-drive connections. Just
saw a sweet little deal on the cutest new Western Digital 320G in 2.5"
formfactor for $29. Great reputation with laptop users, no rebate,
inc/ship -- TigerDirect or Fry, probably.)


http://www.adaptec.com/en-us/support/scsi/u160/asc-39160/

Seagate ST336607LC-REF 36gb u320 10k 80-PIN
by Seagate
Price: $38.12 & FREE Shipping
Internal SCSI
20GB to 36GB
10000 RPM
320 MBps
 

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