USB 3.0 what a joke: The ports seem to have died and reverted to USB 2.0.


R

RayLopez99

The ports seem to have died and reverted to USB 2.0. Always happens with USB hubs, they go bad after a couple of years.

Nice while it lasted

RL
 
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P

Paul

RayLopez99 said:
The ports seem to have died and reverted to USB 2.0. Always happens with USB hubs, they go bad after a couple of years.

Nice while it lasted

RL

USB3 and USB2 are two separate interfaces.
Five pins for USB3. Four pins for USB2.

USB3 is one of those low amplitude interfaces.
Should work similar to PCI Express or SATA, as
they all like the low amplitude differential stuff.

PCI Express, at least some chipsets, are poorly
protected against static electricity.

On the other hand, a few manufacturers, they've
managed 5kV or 6kV resistance to ESD on their USB2 ports.
It's possible the USB3 ports are a little bit more
sensitive to static. As long as you stick with
the USB3 ports on the rear of the computer, they
have the best infrastructure for resistance to
ESD events. Front ports tend to be embedded in plastic,
and the discharges end up flowing in the cable
(which you don't want).

But just as likely, your driver has gone missing.
Have a look in Device Manager, for evidence of
a USB3 driver.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extensible_Host_Controller_Interface

"Support for all speeds[edit]

The OHCI and UHCI controllers support only USB 1 speed devices
(1.5 Mbit/s and 12 Mbit/s),

and the EHCI only supports USB 2 devices (480 Mbit/s).

The xHCI architecture was designed to support all USB speeds,
including SuperSpeed (5 Gbit/s) and future speeds, under a
single driver stack."

Sometimes, in the driver files, you'll see those
labels used for the drivers. So you can figure out
what flavor is loaded right now. Since I don't have
any USB3 here, I can't give examples of what's loaded
on my system right now for USB3. With conventional
USB 1.1/USB2 ports, you'll see an entry for
each of them. The "Enhanced" entry is EHCI, and is
for USB2. I don't know what the xHCI would look
like, in terms of labels.

This example, looks like a non-Microsoft driver for USB3.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/satisfacti.../win7-device-manager-USB-3-Renesas_inline.png

For comparison, this picture shows a broken Microsoft-owned
driver on Windows 8. As opposed to a proprietary one.

http://en.community.dell.com/cfs-fi...518/3007.2013_2D00_05_2D00_23_5F00_023418.png

They didn't get any help here, for that
previous picture.

http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/laptop/f/3518/t/19508937.aspx

OSes other than Windows 8, might be relying on the
proprietary driver (Renesas/Etron/Asmedia/etc).

Paul
 
M

Mr. Man-wai Chang

The ports seem to have died and reverted to USB 2.0. Always happens with USB hubs, they go bad after a couple of years.

USB 3.0 has more pins... that's bad I think. :)

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F

Flasherly

ports seem to have died and reverted to USB 2.0. Always happens with
USB hubs, they go bad after a couple of years.
Nice while it lasted

RL

-
I've heard some pretty wild stories about USB3 for a SSD interface.
Outrageous speeds. But it'll revert if not nailed right the first
time within USB3 specifications. Class 10 flashsticks, I get 30Kb/s
@USB2. . .50 to 100Kb/s should be possible to sustain with USB3 and
the right gear. Flashsticks actually heat up at those speeds
(probably cook, too - no reversion necessary).
 
R

RayLopez99


Thanks to all replies. I'm pretty sure after double checking that it's a hardware problem.

See below on some interesting USB bugs, and apparently Win8 fixes USB 3.0 abit.

RL

The Doc
has seen motherboards that
lost track of the boot drive
because a USB drive was
inserted

Maximum PC, Holiday 2013 edition

Missing Boot Sector;
RAID 0?
One day I came home as nor-
mal, started up my comput-
er, and it turned up a black
screen, with nothing on it but
the words "Missing Operat-
ing System." What could
have caused this? I have my
OS (Windows 7) loaded onto
a 120GB SSD. My computer
still recognizes the drive,
however, it can't find the OS.
I doubt it was caused by a
virus (I run MSE every time I
start my system) and I hadn't
downloaded or installed
anything recently. The first
time this happened, I shut
down and disconnected/
reconnected the drive, and it
worked. But that only worked
once. I tried it again the next
day, and I couldn't get it to
start. I have no idea what
could be wrong.
I was going to boot the
installation disc, and run the
"Repair my computer" option.
Would this work, and save
my data? I don't have much
important data on my SSD,
(most is on my HDD) but I still
don't want to lose it.
Also, I'm running out of
room on my SSD, so I bought
an identical SSD to RAID 0
with my current one. Howev-
er, I did not realize how much
trouble it is to move an OS
between drives. What do you
think is the best way to RAID
0 my SSDs while still keeping
my OS the way it is?
—Jackson Gray

The DocTor responDs:
Take the path of the least
resistance. First, disconnect
any external USB storage
devices you have—USB
keys, USB hard drives—any
external devices that may
have confused the boot. If
that doesn’t work, go into
the UEFI/BIOS and check
the boot order to make sure
it hasn’t changed. The Doc
has seen motherboards that
lost track of the boot drive
because a USB drive was
inserted. After that, running
the "Repair my computer"
option from the installation
disc is a good next step; if
you have a problem with your
boot sector, that'll identify
it and hopefully fix it. If not,
it could be a problem with
your SATA connection. Try
replacing the cable with a
different one. Finally, the
worst-case scenario is a
failure of the SSD itself. SSDs
are resistant to vibration and
shock but their long-term
reliability is proving to be the
same as a hard drive. Many
people make the mistake of
believing that SSDs are infal-
lible and forego backups.
Oftentimes, the actual con-
troller on the SSD will fail.
Data can be recovered but it’s
usually left to professional
data-recovery services. Let’s
hope it’s not that and you can
see the drive. If you can't
repair the boot sector using
Windows’ “repair” option, try
booting your computer from
a live CD to see if the drive
itself shows up. If so, copy as
much of the data off of it as
you can.
As for running out of
room, you're probably better
off skipping the RAID and
just adding the new SSD to
your computer as a separate
drive, especially if you're
having problems with your
first one. To get your cur-
rent image onto your RAID,
you'd have to write an image
of your whole disk, includ-
ing boot sectors and hidden
partitions, to an external
drive, set up the RAID, and
write that image back to
the RAIDed drives. Keep in
mind that any problems with
either of the drives renders
your whole RAID a bust, so
the Doc suggests you cut
your losses and just add the
second SSD as a separate
volume, at least until you pin
down the problem with your
first SSD.

The DocTor responDs: As we noted
in our review (http://bit.ly/PCitPe),
"Windows 8 performance is generally the
same as Windows 7, with a performance
edge in anything that uses the Windows
Media Foundation and likely anything
that is heavily multithreaded. USB 3.0 is
also markedly improved." You can see
a more detailed explanation in the link
above. Because Win8 is built on the same
code base as Win7, nearly all hardware
and software that works in Win7 should
work in Win8. We haven't seen too many
instances where something suddenly
stopped working in Win8, but if there are
specific programs and hardware you rely
on, you should check the manufacturer's
website before upgrading.
As for the Maximum PC staff, they're
split down the middle. Three editors
use Win7, and three use Win8, although
two of those use Classic Shell (www.
classicshell.net) to bring back the Start
Menu
 
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P

Paul

RayLopez99 said:
Thanks to all replies. I'm pretty sure after double checking that it's a hardware problem.

See below on some interesting USB bugs, and apparently Win8 fixes USB 3.0 a bit.

RL

You can try booting a recent Linux LiveCD and test USB3 there.

If it's a software problem, the problem could be gone with
a different OS.

With a hardware problem, the problem would still be there.

You can use iotop to measure transfer speeds, and get some
idea which USB standard the Linux LiveCD is using.

Also, take a look in the BIOS, to see if there are
any USB settings that might be flipped.

Paul
 
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