TSWEB and RDP


G

Guest

I'm at work, behind a firewall that blocks port 3389 at a minimum, I don't
know if the work firewall is blocking RDP packets completely. I have TSWEB
running on one of two home PCs, and I'd like to remote desktop to the other.
This tests corectly from home, and I can get to the TSWEB machine from here
at work. My TSWEB machine listens for HTTP on port 401
(http://homepc:401/tsweb), and the machine I want to remote to is using
standard 3389. My router is forwarding port 401 to the TSWEB machine, and is
forwarding port 3389 to the remote desktop machine. My questions are below

Am I correct in assuming that the TSWEB machine is not acting as a proxy for
RDP packets? What I was hoping is that the RDP packets would be passed
through with the HTTP traffic, thus avoiding any firewall blocks on RDP
traffic alone, and avoiding port 3389.

If the TSWEB machine is not acting as a proxy, what would be the point of
ever running a TSWEB machine?

Do I need to forward port 3389 to the TSWEB machine as well? Even though I
want to get to a different desktop?

Thanks for any help on this.

John
 
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C

Chris Priede

John said:
Am I correct in assuming that the TSWEB machine is not
acting as a proxy for RDP packets?

You are.
If the TSWEB machine is not acting as a proxy, what would
be the point of ever running a TSWEB machine?

Convenient means of client delivery and connection setup. Prior to XP,
Windows did not come with RDP client included. When logging on remotely
from such an older machine, it is an alternative to searching for,
downloading and installing the full-blown client. It can also be
pre-configured with the connection details, eliminating the need for users
to remember them.

Architecturally, however, it doesn't do anything new. The ActiveX control
is still donwnloaded to and runs on the user's computer. It does not help
get around any connectivity issues between the client and remote host -- as
you've found out.

What you need is something like this:

http://www.http-tunnel.com/html/solutions/http_tunnel/client.asp

As with all such things, circumventing intentional restrictions, use at your
own risk. There's no guarantee it will work in your specific circumstances.
There's also no guarantee the management will appreciate you using it. :)
 
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G

Guest

Thanks Chris, sort of what I expected.


Chris Priede said:
You are.


Convenient means of client delivery and connection setup. Prior to XP,
Windows did not come with RDP client included. When logging on remotely
from such an older machine, it is an alternative to searching for,
downloading and installing the full-blown client. It can also be
pre-configured with the connection details, eliminating the need for users
to remember them.

Architecturally, however, it doesn't do anything new. The ActiveX control
is still donwnloaded to and runs on the user's computer. It does not help
get around any connectivity issues between the client and remote host -- as
you've found out.

What you need is something like this:

http://www.http-tunnel.com/html/solutions/http_tunnel/client.asp

As with all such things, circumventing intentional restrictions, use at your
own risk. There's no guarantee it will work in your specific circumstances.
There's also no guarantee the management will appreciate you using it. :)
 

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