system restore out of space?


J

JACK

hi I'm using a compaq pressaro 5000 winxp.

I'm recieving a notice of out of disk space on my recovery
partion drive letter :\d which is currently showing a usage amount of 3.58
gb on a 4.gb ext partiton.

I' looked in M.S./H.S. I' found no info about what program is making all
these backups?system restore?ntbackup?

I' checked the system-restore space-allocation for the drive d: it's too the
max of 12%

the disk cleanup wizard poped up & showed that the recylce bin & the catalog
files were zero bytes,on the more options tab it gave me the option to
delete the old but keep most current restores, delete yese/no ?

will I' loose my computer recovery by using the cleanup wizard?
 
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S

SC Tom

JACK said:
hi I'm using a compaq pressaro 5000 winxp.

I'm recieving a notice of out of disk space on my recovery
partion drive letter :\d which is currently showing a usage amount of
3.58 gb on a 4.gb ext partiton.

I' looked in M.S./H.S. I' found no info about what program is making all
these backups?system restore?ntbackup?

I' checked the system-restore space-allocation for the drive d: it's too
the max of 12%

the disk cleanup wizard poped up & showed that the recylce bin & the
catalog files were zero bytes,on the more options tab it gave me the
option to delete the old but keep most current restores, delete yese/no ?

will I' loose my computer recovery by using the cleanup wizard?

If D: is your Compaq recovery partition, you shouldn't be writing anything
to it, not even Microsoft's System Recovery. Go into your settings and
uncheck the D: drive. All the restore points on that partition only will be
erased, leaving the others alone.

If you've updated your system since buying the PC (such as updating to
service pack 2 or 3), then the recovery partition is going to cause you a
lot of work if you have to use it since it will bring your PC back day one.
You will be better off using an external drive to create system backups
and/or disk images. That way if there is a catastrophic internal disk
failure, you'll lose little, and won't have to reinstall all the service
packs and security updates, not to mention all the programs you've loaded.
 
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T

Twayne

In
JACK said:
hi I'm using a compaq pressaro 5000 winxp.

I'm recieving a notice of out of disk space on my recovery
partion drive letter :\d which is currently showing a usage
amount of 3.58 gb on a 4.gb ext partiton.

Are you trying to save data or files to that folder? If so, DON'T!! It at
least sounds like you are trying to use the computer backup recovery folder
for your own files. Otherwise there should be NOTHING written to it. It
probably isn't even using the NTFS file system.
I' looked in M.S./H.S. I' found no info about what program
is making all these backups?system restore?ntbackup?

If I'm correct that it's your recovery partition, to restore the computer to
factory defaults, then it's being created by the Operating system and you
have no control over iit other than to set the amount of disk space it's
allowed to use.
I' checked the system-restore space-allocation for the
drive d: it's too the max of 12%

the disk cleanup wizard poped up & showed that the recylce
bin & the catalog files were zero bytes,on the more options
tab it gave me the option to delete the old but keep most
current restores, delete yese/no ?
will I' loose my computer recovery by using the cleanup
wizard?

NO. All you'll lose is a few restore points you could use to restore your
operating system. Nothing else unless you've installed programs since the
last restore point; in wich case they may need to be reinstalled.

You appear to be talking about "System Restore Points" accessed in System
Tools. It uses 12% of your disk space total by default but can be set to a
lower number if so desired. That will provide fewer System Restore Points,
but it's often not a big deal; only you can decide whether it's worth it or
not.
System Restore Points has NOTHING TO DO with any data or programs that
you've loaded to use. It holds ONLY restore information for the XP operating
system.

For your next post, you might find reading this useful:


An excerpt:

Before You Ask
Before asking a technical question by e-mail, or in a newsgroup, or on a
website chat board, do the following:

1.. Try to find an answer by searching the archives of the forum you plan
to post to.

2.. Try to find an answer by searching the Web.

3.. Try to find an answer by reading the manual.

4.. Try to find an answer by reading a FAQ.

5.. Try to find an answer by inspection or experimentation.

6.. Try to find an answer by asking a skilled friend.

7.. If you're a programmer, try to find an answer by reading the source
code.

When you ask your question, display the fact that you have done these things
first; this will help establish that you're not being a lazy sponge and
wasting people's time. Better yet, display what you have learned from doing
these things. We like answering questions for people who have demonstrated
they can learn from the answers.

Use tactics like doing a Google search on the text of whatever error message
you get (searching Google groups as well as Web pages). This might well take
you straight to fix documentation or a mailing list thread answering your
question. Even if it doesn't, saying "I googled on the following phrase but
didn't get anything that looked promising" is a good thing to do in e-mail
or news postings requesting help, if only because it records what searches
won't help. It will also help to direct other people with similar problems
to your thread by linking the search terms to what will hopefully be your
problem and resolution thread.

Take your time. Do not expect to be able to solve a complicated problem with
a few seconds of Googling. Read and understand the FAQs, sit back, relax and
give the problem some thought before approaching experts. Trust us, they
will be able to tell from your questions how much reading and thinking you
did, and will be more willing to help if you come prepared. Don't instantly
fire your whole arsenal of questions just because your first search turned
up no answers (or too many).

Prepare your question. Think it through. Hasty-sounding questions get hasty
answers, or none at all. The more you do to demonstrate that having put
thought and effort into solving your problem before seeking help, the more
likely you are to actually get help.

Beware of asking the wrong question. If you ask one that is based on faulty
assumptions, J. Random Hacker is quite likely to reply with a uselessly
literal answer while thinking "Stupid question...", and hoping the
experience of getting what you asked for rather than what you needed will
teach you a lesson.

Never assume you are entitled to an answer. You are not; you aren't, after
all, paying for the service. You will earn an answer, if you earn it, by
asking a substantial, interesting, and thought-provoking question - one that
implicitly contributes to the experience of the community rather than merely
passively demanding knowledge from others.

On the other hand, making it clear that you are able and willing to help in
the process of developing the solution is a very good start. "Would someone
provide a pointer?", "What is my example missing?", and "What site should I
have checked?" are more likely to get answered than "Please post the exact
procedure I should use." because you're making it clear that you're truly
willing to complete the process if someone can just point you in the right
direction.



HTH,



Twayne`
 

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