replacing fuser heater element


A

anon

My printer is a Brother HL8V laser. I've got the heater element out of the
fuser assembly - see pics at:
http://home.freeuk.net/tonj/printer/fuser.htm

I had an error on the printer LCD display that said 50 FUSER MALF. I'm
pretty sure this is because the heater element has blown, but before I
splash out money on a new element I'd like to be sure of my facts, and I'd
be grateful for opinions as to whether I'm right or not. I read somewhere
the resistance through a fuser element should be about 5 ohms or so, is this
correct? The one I have is open ciruit, it passes no current at all. Perhaps
the fuser's appearance in the picture may mean something to an experienced
printer repairer...are they supposed to look like this?
 
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N

Nunnayabidniz

My printer is a Brother HL8V laser. I've got the heater element out of the
fuser assembly - see pics at:
http://home.freeuk.net/tonj/printer/fuser.htm

I had an error on the printer LCD display that said 50 FUSER MALF. I'm
pretty sure this is because the heater element has blown, but before I
splash out money on a new element I'd like to be sure of my facts, and I'd
be grateful for opinions as to whether I'm right or not. I read somewhere
the resistance through a fuser element should be about 5 ohms or so, is this
correct? The one I have is open ciruit, it passes no current at all. Perhaps
the fuser's appearance in the picture may mean something to an experienced
printer repairer...are they supposed to look like this?
Ask your question in the comp.sys.hp.hardware newsgroup as in the
pictures, your printer is really an HP Laserjet II with the Brother
name on the front.
 
Q

Quadrajet1

fuser assembly - see pics at:
http://home.freeuk.net/tonj/printer/fuser.htm

I had an error on the printer LCD display that said 50 FUSER MALF. I'm
pretty sure this is because the heater element has blown, but before I
splash out money on a new element I'd like to be sure of my facts, and I'd
be grateful for opinions as to whether I'm right or not. I read somewhere
the resistance through a fuser element should be about 5 ohms or so, is this
correct? The one I have is open ciruit, it passes no current at all. Perhaps
the fuser's appearance in the picture may mean something to an experienced
printer repairer...are they supposed to look like this?
Ask your question in the comp.sys.hp.hardware newsgroup as in the
pictures, your printer is really an HP Laserjet II with the Brother
name on the front. >>


Hmmm, and I always thought this was a PRINTER newgroup. And since you have
a printer question... Yes, the fuser bulb is major league gone. It should be
semi-clear, and yours is blown to smithereens. I have quite a few fusers
around the garage and I'll sell you a good bulb for super cheap plus shipping.
 
W

Warren

My printer is a Brother HL8V laser. I've got the heater element out of the
fuser assembly - see pics at:
http://home.freeuk.net/tonj/printer/fuser.htm

I had an error on the printer LCD display that said 50 FUSER MALF. I'm
pretty sure this is because the heater element has blown, but before I
splash out money on a new element I'd like to be sure of my facts, and I'd
be grateful for opinions as to whether I'm right or not. I read somewhere
the resistance through a fuser element should be about 5 ohms or so, is this
correct? The one I have is open ciruit, it passes no current at all. Perhaps
the fuser's appearance in the picture may mean something to an experienced
printer repairer...are they supposed to look like this?
Be aware that false indications of fuser failure are fairly common.
Since the fuser is a high current device the contacts to it must be
very secure and low resistance, and over time these little plugs can
become loose. Take it apart and put it all back together again, see
if that fixes things (of course test the fuser for continuity when you
get it out).
 
C

Chris Cochran

If the heat lamp in the picture is the questionable one, there's really no
question that it's BLOWN. It's like a light bulb. The glass should be clear
containing what looks like a shiny bass guitar string centered in the middle
of the tube. You need a new heat lamp.

You'll need another one soon if you don't install it properly. The key is:

DO NOT TOUCH THE GLASS PORTION WITH YOUR HANDS (or anything else that could
have an oil or foreign material on it) WHEN INSTALLING THE NEW LAMP. The oil
acts as a heat amplifier and will create a hot spot on the rod. The hot spot
will reduce the resistance of the filament inside and cause it to blow
again.

You can buy that or any other part for your printer from
http://www.bradshawgroup.com. Good luck.

Chris
 
Y

Yianni

If the heat lamp in the picture is the questionable one,
there's really no question that it's BLOWN.
I vote, of course the lamp is definitely blown.

You can buy that or any other part for your printer from
http://www.bradshawgroup.com. Good luck.
Someone could use a conventional halogen lamp for lighting, about 1000W. The
fuser has two thermostats (one for adjusting the correct temperature, and a
second one for safety reason), so the proper wattage is not a rule. The lamp
works in a voltage less than mains, so the lighting effect is less, the
heating effect is the usefull effect. The length of the lamp could be about
the same as the original (a bit shorter is also not a problem).
 
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B

Bob Kos

Yianni said:
Someone could use a conventional halogen lamp for lighting, about 1000W. The
fuser has two thermostats (one for adjusting the correct temperature, and a
second one for safety reason), so the proper wattage is not a rule. The lamp
works in a voltage less than mains, so the lighting effect is less, the
heating effect is the usefull effect. The length of the lamp could be about
the same as the original (a bit shorter is also not a problem).
Thanks for sharing that. I have observed these tubes and wondered if they
could be substituted in a manner as you indicate.
 

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