Reburbished drive is BETTER than the NEW ONE?? wtf


C

Crackles McFarly

I had one of those Seagate 7200.10 320GB drive made in CHINA, it made
that horrible CHIRP and other noises. I had it replaced, seagate sent
me a 'refurbished' drive from SNIGAPORE and it works VERY WELL.
Even benchmarks are 5%-10% BETTER!!???

Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.

I think it's the fact that mine is now from SINGAPORE and not China. I
heard some terrible stories about the drives made in China too.


Oh well, I guess?
 
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M

MCheu

Crackles said:
I had one of those Seagate 7200.10 320GB drive made in CHINA, it made
that horrible CHIRP and other noises. I had it replaced, seagate sent
me a 'refurbished' drive from SNIGAPORE and it works VERY WELL.
Even benchmarks are 5%-10% BETTER!!???

Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.

I think it's the fact that mine is now from SINGAPORE and not China. I
heard some terrible stories about the drives made in China too.


Oh well, I guess?

It's not particularly surprising, or even unusual.

1. Refurbished hard drives aren't repaired. They're just tested.
Typically, the testing is the same as for a new drive, or slightly more
stringent, as this same drive passed QC the first time it left the
factory. That means that either the refurb had nothing wrong with it
when it got returned, or the QC tests aren't good enough to catch
whatever was wrong with it. Either way, that means that aside from the
way shorter warranty, the refurb is as good as the new one -- which
isn't necessarily saying much.

2. Typically RMA policy for all the major manufacturers is to send out
the same model or a newer one that's as close in specs as the original,
if they don't have one in stock. When there's a shortage or issue with
a particular model, it's not unheard of for a company to send out a
better model.

3. Consider that the one you returned wasn't running at 100%. Before it
went down for the count, the problems were probably affecting its
performance. If the replacement *is* working properly, you're comparing
a drive working to spec, vs one that was having to compensate for bad
reads and writes.
 
I

isaac4all

hi
seagate SNIGAPORE is better than see gate CHINA.
when we shop for Seagate hard drive, we do not purchase any other
seagate hard drive that is not made in SNIGAPORE because accounding to
our study seagate SNIGAPORE is more reliable and does not get damaged
has made in china does. we have used a seagate hard drive made in
SNIGAPORE for 6 years 3 monrh now without any problems. wither the
hard drive is refurbished or not made in SNIGAPORE is far better than
made in china


isaac okoye
information rules the world
www.finditall100free.ds4a.com/Shopping.htm
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

Crackles McFarly said:
I had one of those Seagate 7200.10 320GB drive made in CHINA, it made
that horrible CHIRP and other noises. I had it replaced, seagate sent
me a 'refurbished' drive from SNIGAPORE and it works VERY WELL.
Even benchmarks are 5%-10% BETTER!!???
Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.

Oh, and why is that.
I think it's the fact that mine is now from SINGAPORE and not China.

Of course, that's it. How clever of you.

Obviously the fact that the refurbished drive was tested extensively
before it was given the green flag and the "new one" wasn't has got
nothing to do with it.
I heard some terrible stories about the drives made in China too.

And they are all true.
That's why all the major manufacturers make their drives there.
Oh well, I guess?

Guessing makes your head hurt.
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

MCheu said:
It's not particularly surprising, or even unusual.
1. Refurbished hard drives aren't repaired.

Oh? You're saying that they lie?
(Not to say that refurbished necessarily means 'repaired').
They're just tested.

They're that too.
Typically, the testing is the same as for a new drive,

Not very likely.
or slightly more stringent,
as this same drive passed QC the first time it left the factory.
That means that either the refurb had nothing wrong with it
when it got returned, or the QC tests aren't good enough to catch
whatever was wrong with it.
Either way, that means that aside from the way shorter warranty,

Actually, the warranty period is exactly the same as for the one
that you returned. It's transferred to the refurbished drive.
the refurb is as good as the new one --

Hopefully not.
which isn't necessarily saying much.
Exactly.


2. Typically RMA policy for all the major manufacturers is to send out
the same model or a newer one that's as close in specs as the original, if
they don't have one in stock. When there's a shortage or issue with a par-
ticular model, it's not unheard of for a company to send out a better model.
 
F

Frank McCoy

In alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt Crackles McFarly
I had one of those Seagate 7200.10 320GB drive made in CHINA, it made
that horrible CHIRP and other noises. I had it replaced, seagate sent
me a 'refurbished' drive from SNIGAPORE and it works VERY WELL.
Even benchmarks are 5%-10% BETTER!!???

Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.
No, not really.
I think it's the fact that mine is now from SINGAPORE and not China. I
heard some terrible stories about the drives made in China too.
Different factories just *do* things differently, in spite of the
company trying their damndest to make them run exactly alike.

Reminds me of the old story about moving the vacuum-tube business to
Russia ... Some tubes just would NOT work until they sent over the whole
team from the original company and got the line running right.

The specifications and even components just are NOT the drive.
 
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B

businessman

hi
seagate SNIGAPORE is better than see gate CHINA.
when we shop for Seagate hard drive, we do not purchase any other
seagate hard drive that is not made in SNIGAPORE because accounding to
our study seagate SNIGAPORE is more reliable and does not get damaged
has made in china does. we have used a seagate hard drive made in
SNIGAPORE for 6 years 3 monrh now without any problems. wither the
hard drive is refurbished or not made in SNIGAPORE is far better than
made in china


isaac okoye
information rules the world
www.finditall100free.ds4a.com/Shopping.htm

Almost everything made in china is garbage these days.
 
K

kony

I had one of those Seagate 7200.10 320GB drive made in CHINA, it made
that horrible CHIRP and other noises. I had it replaced, seagate sent
me a 'refurbished' drive from SNIGAPORE and it works VERY WELL.
Even benchmarks are 5%-10% BETTER!!???

Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.

I think it's the fact that mine is now from SINGAPORE and not China. I
heard some terrible stories about the drives made in China too.


Oh well, I guess?


You have a sample size of one each. Realize what that
means.
 
F

Franc Zabkar

Actually, the warranty period is exactly the same as for the one
that you returned. It's transferred to the refurbished drive.

In 2003 or 2004 I purchased a Seagate ST3120026A drive with either a 2
or 3 year warranty which would have expired in Aug 2006. About a year
later (Jan 2005) I received an identical replacement with a 5 year
warranty that expires in Dec 2009, ie the new warranty is for the full
5 years, not 5 - 1.

Has Seagate's policy changed since then?

- Franc Zabkar
 
B

Bob M

isaac4all said:
hi
seagate SNIGAPORE is better than see gate CHINA.
when we shop for Seagate hard drive, we do not purchase any other
seagate hard drive that is not made in SNIGAPORE because accounding to
our study seagate SNIGAPORE is more reliable and does not get damaged
has made in china does. we have used a seagate hard drive made in
SNIGAPORE for 6 years 3 monrh now without any problems. wither the
hard drive is refurbished or not made in SNIGAPORE is far better than
made in china


isaac okoye
information rules the world
www.finditall100free.ds4a.com/Shopping.htm

Well now that you have fixed your hard drive problems you should
concentrate on your broken keyboard.
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

In 2003 or 2004 I purchased a Seagate ST3120026A drive with either a 2
or 3 year warranty which would have expired in Aug 2006.

You make little sense.
About a year later (Jan 2005) I received an identical replacement with
a 5 year warranty that expires in Dec 2009, ie the new warranty is for
the full 5 years,
not 5 - 1.

What's with the minus 1? You had 19 months of warranty left.
That should have been the new warranty on your replacement drive.
Otherwise you would be able to extend your warranty forever, every
time you break your drive and send it in for warranty.
Has Seagate's policy changed since then?
(what makes you think that that was policy?)

You mean, did Seagate give you a lifelong warranty on your drives?
What do you think. I think you got extremely lucky.
 
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F

Franc Zabkar

1. Refurbished hard drives aren't repaired. They're just tested.
Typically, the testing is the same as for a new drive, or slightly more
stringent, as this same drive passed QC the first time it left the
factory. That means that either the refurb had nothing wrong with it
when it got returned, or the QC tests aren't good enough to catch
whatever was wrong with it. Either way, that means that aside from the
way shorter warranty, ...

I'd confirm the warranty status of the replacement drive here:
http://support.seagate.com/customer/warranty_validation.jsp
... the refurb is as good as the new one

- Franc Zabkar
 
F

Franc Zabkar

You make little sense.

It means that I can't remember whether I bought the drive in 2003 or
2004. Neither can I remember whether the warranty was for 2 or 3
years. But I know for certain that the warranty was valid until Aug
2006 (it's on my RMA), and I know that I had the drive for about a
year.
What's with the minus 1? You had 19 months of warranty left.
That should have been the new warranty on your replacement drive.
Otherwise you would be able to extend your warranty forever, every
time you break your drive and send it in for warranty.

That's what happened. As I plainly stated, my new drive came with a
full 5 year warranty. Seagate's warranty URL confirms this:

http://support.seagate.com/customer/warranty_validation.jsp
(what makes you think that that was policy?)

You mean, did Seagate give you a lifelong warranty on your drives?

Such a practice is not uncommon in retail, especially when a product
is exchanged, rather than repaired.

For example, I recently had a DVD recorder fail after about 10 months
(actually it failed much earlier, but I persisted with it until then).
I eventually returned it to the store (Aldi) and was given a full
refund even though I asked for it to be repaired. In fact I would have
repaired it myself if they'd have reimbursed me for the parts (a $50
IDE DVD burner). Anyway with the refund I was able to purchase a newer
model from the same store for the same price ... with a full warranty.
What do you think. I think you got extremely lucky.

Maybe, but that's what happened. I don't make the rules.

- Franc Zabkar
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

Franc Zabkar said:
It means that I can't remember whether I bought the drive in 2003 or
2004.

You mean whether it was end 2003 or early 2004.
Neither can I remember whether the warranty was for 2 or 3 years.

Usually 3. Either that or 1 year. Which probably means that your's
was on the shelves for 3-4 months since manufacturing Aug 2003.
But I know for certain that the warranty was valid until Aug 2006
(it's on my RMA),
and I know that I had the drive for about a year.

So it's rather clear when you bought it (give or take a few months).
That's what happened.
As I plainly stated, my new drive came with a full 5 year warranty.

Yes, I got that. Now for *my* question, what's with the minus 1.

Did I say that I didn't believe you?
Such a practice is not uncommon in retail,

AFAICT Seagate don't have a WebShop.
especially when a product is exchanged, rather than repaired.

At which time it's not uncommon that you are asked to make payment
for the time that you were able to use it (using depreciation rules).
For example, I recently had a DVD recorder fail after about 10 months
(actually it failed much earlier, but I persisted with it until then).
I eventually returned it to the store (Aldi) and was given a full
refund even though I asked for it to be repaired. In fact I would have
repaired it myself if they'd have reimbursed me for the parts (a $50
IDE DVD burner). Anyway with the refund I was able to purchase a newer
model from the same store for the same price ... with a full warranty.

Aldi eh, such a common example of a computer store, what can I say ....
you're totally right.
Maybe, but that's what happened.
I don't make the rules.

Yup, I believe that is what 'being lucky' means.
 
F

Franc Zabkar

You mean whether it was end 2003 or early 2004.


Usually 3. Either that or 1 year. Which probably means that your's
was on the shelves for 3-4 months since manufacturing Aug 2003.

Yeah, IIRC there was a period where most HD manufacturers (except
Samsung?) dropped their warranties to 1 year.
So it's rather clear when you bought it (give or take a few months).

I would have expected that the new warranty would have been reduced by
a year or so. Whether this amounted to 3-1 or 5-1 is moot. The fact is
that the new warranty wasn't reduced at all, instead it was increased.

I don't care why it happened this way, it just did. End of story.
Yes, I got that. Now for *my* question, what's with the minus 1.

Why are you being deliberately obtuse?
Did I say that I didn't believe you?

Did I say that you said that I didn't believe you?
AFAICT Seagate don't have a WebShop.

Your point being ???
At which time it's not uncommon that you are asked to make payment
for the time that you were able to use it (using depreciation rules).

I don't recall this ever happening to me.
Aldi eh, such a common example of a computer store, ...

I didn't buy a computer from them. In any case it's irrelevant to the
point I was making, but you knew that.
what can I say ....
you're totally right.

Of course.
Yup, I believe that is what 'being lucky' means.

I'd be interested to know if the OP also "got lucky". Then again,
maybe we just get better service down under.

- Franc Zabkar
 
F

Folkert Rienstra

Franc Zabkar said:
Yeah, IIRC there was a period where most HD manufacturers (except
Samsung?) dropped their warranties to 1 year.


I would have expected that the new warranty would have been reduced by
a year or so. Whether this amounted to 3-1 or 5-1 is moot. The fact is
that the new warranty wasn't reduced at all, instead it was increased.

I don't care why it happened this way, it just did. End of story.


Why are you being deliberately obtuse?

Why are you being deliberately dense. Oh wait, you're Australian.
Did I say that you said that I didn't believe you?

Did you? What do *you* think that you said that I didn't say.
here's a hint: It must be a few lines up from here somewhere.
Your point being ???

They are no retailers. They only cover the warranty.
I don't recall this ever happening to me.


I didn't buy a computer from them.
In any case it's irrelevant to the point I was making, but you knew that.


Of course.


I'd be interested to know if the OP also "got lucky".
Then again, maybe we just get better service

Or maybe Seagate's local service department consists of people every bit
as smart as yourself.
down under.

Ah, that explains a few things.
 
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K

kony

I'd be interested to know if the OP also "got lucky". Then again,
maybe we just get better service down under.

- Franc Zabkar

Since the online warranty checker is only using data based
on manufacture date to determine the beginning of the
warranty period, and since they aren't manually updating
this per drive to note which particular drive was sent to
which customer and how long that particular customer's
remaining warranty period should be, it will not show the
warranty period Seagate intended to provide which is the
remainder of the original warranty period.


http://www.seagate.com/www/en-us/support/warranty_&_returns_assistance/warranty_statements/

Quote:

"Seagate warrants that repaired or replaced
products are covered for the greater of either
the remainder of the original product warranty
or 90 days."

Technically, you aren't supposed to have 5 years on the
replacement. Actually, if you sent in the drive after your
original warranty period was supposed to expire, whether it
was accepted for replacement or not would depend on whether
they use the same mechanism to check the warranty period
that is provided online, or whether they use a different one
tied to the customer. It seems quite likely your warranty
would not be extended beyond the original 5 years if you
were required to send in the original receipt or were asked
when it was purchased.
 
F

Franc Zabkar

It seems quite likely your warranty
would not be extended beyond the original 5 years if you
were required to send in the original receipt or were asked
when it was purchased.

In the past I have returned probably 50 drives from different
manufacturers (Fujitsu, Maxtor, Seagate, Quantum) and have never had
to provide proof of purchase, nor did I have any because I wasn't the
original purchaser. The manufacture date, or a facsimile of the
drive's label, was deemed sufficient in all cases. Furthermore, in one
particular case, a replacement Maxtor drive failed a second time and
was in turn replaced by a current model of double the capacity.

IIRC there were major revisions to warranty *periods* at about the
time that I bought my Seagate drive. That's why I asked whether it may
have also been subject to different warranty *conditions*.

- Franc Zabkar
 
F

Franc Zabkar

It seems quite likely your warranty
would not be extended beyond the original 5 years if you
were required to send in the original receipt or were asked
when it was purchased.

I should add that about 10 years ago (?) Seagate were offering
extended warranties up to 5 years. IIRC the cost was about 1% of the
purchase price for each additional year. I supplied several such
drives to a corporate client and I bought one for myself. Although no
drives failed, I seem to recall that I validated the extended warranty
in later years via Seagate's web site.

- Franc Zabkar
 
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A

Aidan Karley

Seems odd that a REFURBISHED drive would work so much better than a
new one.
In addition to the points others have made about testing, and
the original device being not-100% good, there's also at least the
opportunity for the manufacturers to re-flash the firmware code on the
device with the most-recently de-bugged version. In most cases, that
would probably involve improvements internally which don't change the
external interfaces of the device.

("drive" changed to "device" while composing. Fro obvious reasons.)
 

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