PST nightmare


J

JED

Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e-mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED
 
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Advertisements

R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just open the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
 
G

Guest

Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie
-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just open the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e- mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED

.
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing up data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie
-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just open the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e- mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED

.
 
G

Guest

Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing up data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie
-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just
open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e- mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.

.
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Importing and exporting just introduces two more opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing up data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
message
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.

.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

JED

Oh, I see. Believe it or not, this is all new to me. I'll
give that a go and see what happens. Does transferring
one pst file to another overwrite data to prevent
duplications? If I crashed (which I have done before) how
would I get the data back into outlook?

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Importing and exporting just introduces two more opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing
up
data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I
have
a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
message
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my
contacts
as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.



.

.
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Well that depends on what you mean by "transferring." The worst thing you
can do is simply try to overwrite one PST file with another.

To use another PST file (such as one from an earlier installation) and set
it to be the default for your current installation of Outlook, you will
first need to know the location and name of the PST file you'd like to use
as your new default. Then use the following directions, depending on version
and mode of Outlook:

98/2000 Corporate Mode: (With Outlook closed)
- Control Panel > Mail applet
- Remove the current Personal Folder service
- Readd the service, directing it to the new PST file location
- Restart Outlook

98/ 2000 Internet Mail Only mode:
- File menu > Open > Personal Folders file > migrate to the new PST file
location to open it
- Right-click on the root of the new set of folders in the folder pane (View
Folder List)
- Choose Properties
- Check the "Deliver POP mail" box
- Quit & restart Outlook
- Now you can Close the PST file that you were previously using (R-click on
that pst folder while in Folder View and select "Close <foldername>
Folders"). If you have any information in your former PST that you'd like to
transfer to your new default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the
other before you close the old one.


Outlook 2002/2003:
- Go to Tools > Options > Mail Setup > Data Files > Add...
- Add the PST you'd like as your new default, then Close > OK to exit the
Options dialog
- Go to Tools > E-mail Accounts > View or change existing e-mail accounts
- Select the PST you just added in the "Deliver New e-mail to the following
location" dropdown (it will most likely appear just below the current
default Personal Folders file) > Finish
- Exit and Restart Outlook
- You can now close the previous default PST (R-click on that pst folder
while in Folder View and select "Close <foldername> Folders"). If you have
any information in your former PST that you'd like to transfer to your new
default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the other before you close
the old one.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
JED said:
Oh, I see. Believe it or not, this is all new to me. I'll
give that a go and see what happens. Does transferring
one pst file to another overwrite data to prevent
duplications? If I crashed (which I have done before) how
would I get the data back into outlook?

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Importing and exporting just introduces two more opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly
which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing up
data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a
different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another
Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and
copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back
into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop
then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have
a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just
open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
message
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts
as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst
file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.



.

.
 
J

JED

Hi Russ,

First off, I'm really grateful for the help you are
giving.

I am working with OL 2000 Internet Only. I understand now
how to make a previous pst file the default. It took a
while!

What is the best way to back up a pst file? I presume it
is always up-to-date in the root directory so would it be
acceptable to simply drag it to a CD from that location
and burn it?

I have also heard that Microsoft have a back up utility
that I could download from the internet. Would this be
useful?

Final question, why does Outlook have the facility to
export and import pst files if it is such a nightmare?

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Well that depends on what you mean by "transferring." The worst thing you
can do is simply try to overwrite one PST file with another.

To use another PST file (such as one from an earlier installation) and set
it to be the default for your current installation of Outlook, you will
first need to know the location and name of the PST file you'd like to use
as your new default. Then use the following directions, depending on version
and mode of Outlook:

98/2000 Corporate Mode: (With Outlook closed)
- Control Panel > Mail applet
- Remove the current Personal Folder service
- Readd the service, directing it to the new PST file location
- Restart Outlook

98/ 2000 Internet Mail Only mode:
- File menu > Open > Personal Folders file > migrate to the new PST file
location to open it
- Right-click on the root of the new set of folders in the folder pane (View
- Choose Properties
- Check the "Deliver POP mail" box
- Quit & restart Outlook
- Now you can Close the PST file that you were previously using (R-click on
that pst folder while in Folder View and select "Close
Folders"). If you have any information in your former PST that you'd like to
transfer to your new default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the
other before you close the old one.


Outlook 2002/2003:
- Go to Tools > Options > Mail Setup > Data Files > Add...
- Add the PST you'd like as your new default, then Close
OK to exit the
Options dialog
- Go to Tools > E-mail Accounts > View or change existing e-mail accounts
- Select the PST you just added in the "Deliver New e- mail to the following
location" dropdown (it will most likely appear just below the current
default Personal Folders file) > Finish
- Exit and Restart Outlook
- You can now close the previous default PST (R-click on that pst folder
while in Folder View and select "Close <foldername> Folders"). If you have
any information in your former PST that you'd like to transfer to your new
default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the other before you close
the old one.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Oh, I see. Believe it or not, this is all new to me. I'll
give that a go and see what happens. Does transferring
one pst file to another overwrite data to prevent
duplications? If I crashed (which I have done before) how
would I get the data back into outlook?

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Importing and exporting just introduces two more opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me
through
how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly
which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for
backing
up
data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a
different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another
Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and
copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first
exported
my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back
into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I
thought I
was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop
then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I have
a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this, you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just
open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
wrote
in
message
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my contacts
as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst
file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.



.



.

.
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

The most reliable way to back up a PST file is just to copy it to the
location of your choice periodically. I have never had the occasion to use
Microsoft's backup utility, since the former method is so easy and reliable
that it's all I've ever used.

Importing and Exporting are primarily for exporting your Outlook Data to
other file types. While it can be used to create other PST files as well,
it's just not as reliable nor does it preserve as much information as simply
copying the entire PST file. I've just seen too many posts from users who
have unpleasant surprises after exporting and importing PST files.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
JED said:
Hi Russ,

First off, I'm really grateful for the help you are
giving.

I am working with OL 2000 Internet Only. I understand now
how to make a previous pst file the default. It took a
while!

What is the best way to back up a pst file? I presume it
is always up-to-date in the root directory so would it be
acceptable to simply drag it to a CD from that location
and burn it?

I have also heard that Microsoft have a back up utility
that I could download from the internet. Would this be
useful?

Final question, why does Outlook have the facility to
export and import pst files if it is such a nightmare?

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Well that depends on what you mean by "transferring." The worst thing you
can do is simply try to overwrite one PST file with another.

To use another PST file (such as one from an earlier installation) and set
it to be the default for your current installation of Outlook, you will
first need to know the location and name of the PST file you'd like to use
as your new default. Then use the following directions, depending on version
and mode of Outlook:

98/2000 Corporate Mode: (With Outlook closed)
- Control Panel > Mail applet
- Remove the current Personal Folder service
- Readd the service, directing it to the new PST file location
- Restart Outlook

98/ 2000 Internet Mail Only mode:
- File menu > Open > Personal Folders file > migrate to the new PST file
location to open it
- Right-click on the root of the new set of folders in the folder pane (View
- Choose Properties
- Check the "Deliver POP mail" box
- Quit & restart Outlook
- Now you can Close the PST file that you were previously using (R-click on
that pst folder while in Folder View and select "Close
Folders"). If you have any information in your former PST that you'd like to
transfer to your new default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the
other before you close the old one.


Outlook 2002/2003:
- Go to Tools > Options > Mail Setup > Data Files > Add...
- Add the PST you'd like as your new default, then Close
OK to exit the
Options dialog
- Go to Tools > E-mail Accounts > View or change existing e-mail accounts
- Select the PST you just added in the "Deliver New e- mail to the following
location" dropdown (it will most likely appear just below the current
default Personal Folders file) > Finish
- Exit and Restart Outlook
- You can now close the previous default PST (R-click on that pst folder
while in Folder View and select "Close <foldername> Folders"). If you have
any information in your former PST that you'd like to transfer to your new
default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the other before you close
the old one.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Oh, I see. Believe it or not, this is all new to me. I'll
give that a go and see what happens. Does transferring
one pst file to another overwrite data to prevent
duplications? If I crashed (which I have done before) how
would I get the data back into outlook?

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Importing and exporting just introduces two more
opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the
number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file
to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to
open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to
transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through
how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly
which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing
up
data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a
different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another
Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and
copy the information
you need.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well... I'm exporting purely as a way of backing up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported
my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back
into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-import my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared
also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL
the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I
was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop
then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I
have
a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this,
you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything
out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from
one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just
open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
in
message
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my
contacts
as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as a pst
file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my
old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.



.



.

.
 
J

JED

Great. Thanks again. Have a good Chrsitmas

Jackie
-----Original Message-----
The most reliable way to back up a PST file is just to copy it to the
location of your choice periodically. I have never had the occasion to use
Microsoft's backup utility, since the former method is so easy and reliable
that it's all I've ever used.

Importing and Exporting are primarily for exporting your Outlook Data to
other file types. While it can be used to create other PST files as well,
it's just not as reliable nor does it preserve as much information as simply
copying the entire PST file. I've just seen too many posts from users who
have unpleasant surprises after exporting and importing PST files.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ,

First off, I'm really grateful for the help you are
giving.

I am working with OL 2000 Internet Only. I understand now
how to make a previous pst file the default. It took a
while!

What is the best way to back up a pst file? I presume it
is always up-to-date in the root directory so would it be
acceptable to simply drag it to a CD from that location
and burn it?

I have also heard that Microsoft have a back up utility
that I could download from the internet. Would this be
useful?

Final question, why does Outlook have the facility to
export and import pst files if it is such a nightmare?

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Well that depends on what you mean by "transferring." The worst thing you
can do is simply try to overwrite one PST file with another.

To use another PST file (such as one from an earlier installation) and set
it to be the default for your current installation of Outlook, you will
first need to know the location and name of the PST
file
you'd like to use
as your new default. Then use the following
directions,
depending on version
and mode of Outlook:

98/2000 Corporate Mode: (With Outlook closed)
- Control Panel > Mail applet
- Remove the current Personal Folder service
- Readd the service, directing it to the new PST file location
- Restart Outlook

98/ 2000 Internet Mail Only mode:
- File menu > Open > Personal Folders file > migrate
to
the new PST file
location to open it
- Right-click on the root of the new set of folders in the folder pane (View
Folder List)
- Choose Properties
- Check the "Deliver POP mail" box
- Quit & restart Outlook
- Now you can Close the PST file that you were previously using (R-click on
that pst folder while in Folder View and select "Close
Folders"). If you have any information in your former PST that you'd like to
transfer to your new default PST, you can drag and
drop
from one to the
other before you close the old one.


Outlook 2002/2003:
- Go to Tools > Options > Mail Setup > Data Files > Add...
- Add the PST you'd like as your new default, then Close
OK to exit the
Options dialog
- Go to Tools > E-mail Accounts > View or change existing e-mail accounts
- Select the PST you just added in the "Deliver New e- mail to the following
location" dropdown (it will most likely appear just below the current
default Personal Folders file) > Finish
- Exit and Restart Outlook
- You can now close the previous default PST (R-click
on
that pst folder
while in Folder View and select "Close <foldername> Folders"). If you have
any information in your former PST that you'd like to transfer to your new
default PST, you can drag and drop from one to the
other
before you close
the old one.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Oh, I see. Believe it or not, this is all new to me. I'll
give that a go and see what happens. Does transferring
one pst file to another overwrite data to prevent
duplications? If I crashed (which I have done
before)
how
would I get the data back into outlook?

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Importing and exporting just introduces two more
opportunities for data
corruption and preserves less information. Look at the
number of users who
post here with problems after importing and exporting.

You can easily transfer Outlook data from one PST file
to another by simply
using Outlook's File > Open > Outlook Data File.. to
open a PST in Outlook.
Then you can use the "Copy to Folder..." command to
transfer data from one
PST to another.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Hi Russ

I don't doubt you but what makes importing/exporting a
poor choice? In any case, if opening the pst file and
copying is the best option, could you talk me through
how
this is done. I'm still not clear.

Many thanks

Jackie


-----Original Message-----
Still no way to tell since you did not specify exactly
which of the PST
files you actually imported.

Importing and Exporting is a poor choice for backing
up
data. That option is
used only if you need to transfer your data to a
different format for a
different program. If you are transferring to another
Outlook installation,
just open the PST file in the other installation and
copy the information
you need.
backing
up
contacts and e-mails.

I go through the usual import export feature/to a
file/pst file/destination folder. I first exported
my
Contacts folder (plus sub folders) then I went back
into
Export Import to export my Inbox, having previously
archived old e-mails. When I tried to re-
import
my
contacts folder, all the old e-mails reappeared
also. I
presume this means that any pst file includes ALL
the
folders in Outlook and not just the one I thought I
was
exporting/importing?

When you say transfer directly, what do you actually
mean? I used to drag them onto a file on the desktop
then
zip them for backup but this just took forever (I
have
a
lot of e-mail folders).

Jackie

-----Original Message-----
Since we weren't watching while you did this,
you'll
need to list the
precise steps you used for us to figure anything
out.
While you're at it, if you are transferring from
one
installation of Outlook
to another, why use export and import at all? Just
open
the PST file in
Outlook and transfer what you want directly. That
removes two opportunities
to corrupt your data.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
in
message
[email protected]
Okay, I'm going bonkers. I've exported my
contacts
as a
pst file. I've also exported my e-mails as
a
pst
file.
Why can't I import my contacts without all my
old e-
mails
tagging along!

Please help, someone.

JED


.



.



.



.

.
 
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G

Guest

I have done backup for my Outlook 2002 on my home computer (W-XP) onto a CD-RW. I have tried to back up all my personal folders using the backup, export, drag and drop methods. I can see Outlook pst. files appearing on the disc, however I cannot open any of these files to confirm that indeed the data is backed up. I get the message "Open with..." and it is recommended that I go to the website to get a program to open these files. Of course it is a MS web page and there are no specific instructions on how to open. Do I have a corrupt Outlook or why won't my computer open it? Any help is greatly appreciated.
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

You can't open PST files on a CD.
They must be on a hard drive and you must first remove their read only
attribute before you can open them with Outlook.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
TG said:
I have done backup for my Outlook 2002 on my home computer (W-XP) onto a
CD-RW. I have tried to back up all my personal folders using the backup,
export, drag and drop methods. I can see Outlook pst. files appearing on
the disc, however I cannot open any of these files to confirm that indeed
the data is backed up. I get the message "Open with..." and it is
recommended that I go to the website to get a program to open these files.
Of course it is a MS web page and there are no specific instructions on how
to open. Do I have a corrupt Outlook or why won't my computer open it? Any
help is greatly appreciated.
 
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S

Sue Mosher [MVP]

Also, once you've done what Russ suggests, you need to use Outlook's File |
Open | Outlook Data File command to open the file. YOu can't open it from
Explorer.
--
Sue Mosher, Outlook MVP
Author of
Microsoft Outlook Programming - Jumpstart for
Administrators, Power Users, and Developers



TG said:
I have done backup for my Outlook 2002 on my home computer (W-XP) onto a
CD-RW. I have tried to back up all my personal folders using the backup,
export, drag and drop methods. I can see Outlook pst. files appearing on
the disc, however I cannot open any of these files to confirm that indeed
the data is backed up. I get the message "Open with..." and it is
recommended that I go to the website to get a program to open these files.
Of course it is a MS web page and there are no specific instructions on how
to open. Do I have a corrupt Outlook or why won't my computer open it? Any
help is greatly appreciated.
 

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