PC Makers: Hasta La Vista, Baby!


K

kirk jim

Another answer to that URBAN lie-guy.... whats his name.. I forget...

http://www.crn.com/software/198701022


After all the hype surrounding its January launch, Microsoft's new Vista
operating system has yet to brighten the outlook for PC makers and could
even lead to oversupplies for those who had built up inventory.

Top PC makers, such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo, may now have to
resort to sales of lower-margin computers in emerging markets such as China,
Eastern Europe and Latin America for their growth this year.

Featuring high-definition video and audio functions and three-dimensional
graphics, Vista is being billed as a major upgrade of its predecessor,
Windows XP.

But the software, which runs on more memory and superior graphic cards, has
not taken off as fast as some had hoped, leading to concerns of potential
inventory woes for makers of those products, analysts and industry players
said.

"Vista has had no big help," said Acer's president Gianfranco Lanci, adding
that PC makers are really not counting on Vista to drive high demands for
the industry.

Samsung Electronics, the world's top memory chip maker, also said that
demand for DRAM computer memory chips from Vista hasn't materialised as fast
as it had predicted.

"We had expected the 'Vista impact' on DRAM around April, but now we see it
being delayed into the second half," said Hwang Chang-gyu, semiconductor
business president of Samsung Electronics.

But many PC vendors were already skeptical on fresh demand from Vista even
before the product's launch in January, better preparing them for a
potential disappointment, said JP Morgan analyst Charles Guo.

Major PC players like Asustek Computer, also the world's top motherboard
maker, said Vista might have warmed up the market but significant results
have not been seen.

"We aren't seeing any effects yet and compatibility issues will take at
least six months to resolve," said an executive at Asustek, who declined to
be identified.

He added that many corporate customers -- who tend to buy in much larger
volumes than individual consumers and therefore can make a bigger impact --
were staying on the sidelines for now as individuals accounted for new
buying.

"We've carried out numerous surveys recently with IT managers and they've
all said they are not planning to migrate to Vista, and we are not expecting
a major influx anytime soon," said Bryan Ma, an analyst at IDC, expressing a
similar view.

Different forms of Microsoft's various Windows operating systems now run
more than 90 percent of the world's PCs.

Computer makers are now looking to strong buying from emerging markets such
as China, Eastern Europe and Latin America to boost business.

Dell announced earlier this week a super cheap computer costing as little as
2,599 yuan ($336) specifically for China, now the world's second largest PC
market by unit sales.

Growth Driver
"Emerging markets are still a key driver for growth in the PC sector. Global
PC shipments this year should grow by low double digits, in the 10 percent
range," said Acer's Lanci.

The comment by Acer, which is trying to overtake China's Lenovo as the
world's No. 3 PC maker, was in line with the outlook for the broader
industry.

IDC expects worldwide PC shipments to reach about 253 million units this
year, up 11 percent from 228 million in 2006. That 2007 growth rate is up
from the 9.6 percent posted last year.

Vista's newness aside, analysts also say the right computing platform, which
is needed to run the operating system smoothly, is a main factor that will
determine whether the software will be accepted in the near term.

"Intel's main Santa Rosa platform needed to support Vista features won't be
launched until May 10, and in the last five to 10 years, the biggest PC
driver is still price," said JP Morgan analyst Alvin Kwock.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates said last month that Vista has been well
received and that PC vendors have seen a nice lift in their sales.

A week before his comments, CEO Steve Ballmer had said that Vista would only
create a "small surge" in PC sales for its fiscal year starting in July, and
would not spur a big increase in normal growth rates.

"Vista was very popular in the first couple of weeks, but let's not just
focus on that. Dell and Hewlett-Packard don't even advertise much on PCs
with Vista," said JP Morgan's Kwock. (Additional reporting by Sophie Taylor
in Shanghai and So Eui Rhee in Seoul)



By: Sheena Lee

Copyright 2007 Reuters. Click for Restrictions

As per CMP's agreement with Reuters, this story will be removed from this
site after 30 days.
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

Drew

Re-read the frickin article Knothead !!!Not that I am or needed to defend
him but His point of Vista outselling xp in the first whatever WAS right and
nowhere in here does it say otherwise..
 
B

Bill

When I tested the Vista beta last August, I felt that it would not have
much of a positive impact on the market. I thought that it was a lemon
and that the major effect of its introduction would be to open the door
to alternative operating systems that have been languishing in the
wings. On the following week, I removed the Beta and installed
pclinuxos. Several weeks ago, I installed pclinuxos tr3. I now run XP
in a VMWARE window within pclinuxos. To tell the truth, I was getting
bored with XP, and I felt that Vista was not ready for prime time and
that it was so alien to my normal computer experience and so fraught with
bugs, that I didnt want it anywhere near my computer. Today, I learned
how to connect the printer to my VMWARE window, and I doubt that I will
ever run Windows XP, as a separate boot again. I have learned a lot in
the last 6 months. It was worth it. I now have a very stable system and
I can easily do everything I want with my computer. The OS takes full
advantage of my dual core amd-64 4200 cpu and my 2 gigs of memory.
Everything is fast and I do not notice any slow down when using the XP
window. Pclinuxos has three buttons on the taskbar that help you
configure your computer.

1. Configure your computer button set your computer up.
2. Synaptic adds new software and updates existing software.
3. Configure your desktop allows you to set up your desktop anyway that
you like.

Simplicity, easy enough for a beginner.

If you have to learn a new OS, why not learn one that works?
 
G

Guest

Mr "kirk jim",
I feel that you may not be well recieved here. Why?
I built a complete new system,from scratch, to recieve "Windows Vista".
Made sure everything was accepted by Vista. The only thing I fudged on was
the min.-1gig Ram instead of the preferred 2gig.
Vista installed without a problem. Except it didn't want to see the modem.
But I finally got it to. I half way expected it to give me a problem with a
modem because Vista is geared for DSL or more.
In about two weeks and all the updates the system was degrading day by day.
To were the video was 2-D. Error reports all over the place. Until I had to
get a third party disk manager to wipe the drives so I could get XP to
reinstall.
XP works just fine with no glitches.
From what I have experienced with Vista is that it will have to be forced
on to the home PC community. Most home PC owners will not want to shell out
the money for a complete new PC to get Vista. Unless the old one gave up the
ghost. And a new one was the only answer.
 
L

Lang Murphy

kirk jim said:
Another answer to that URBAN lie-guy.... whats his name.. I forget...

http://www.crn.com/software/198701022


After all the hype surrounding its January launch, Microsoft's new Vista
operating system has yet to brighten the outlook for PC makers and could
even lead to oversupplies for those who had built up inventory.

Top PC makers, such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo, may now have to
resort to sales of lower-margin computers in emerging markets such as
China, Eastern Europe and Latin America for their growth this year.

Featuring high-definition video and audio functions and three-dimensional
graphics, Vista is being billed as a major upgrade of its predecessor,
Windows XP.

But the software, which runs on more memory and superior graphic cards,
has not taken off as fast as some had hoped, leading to concerns of
potential inventory woes for makers of those products, analysts and
industry players said.

"Vista has had no big help," said Acer's president Gianfranco Lanci,
adding that PC makers are really not counting on Vista to drive high
demands for the industry.

Samsung Electronics, the world's top memory chip maker, also said that
demand for DRAM computer memory chips from Vista hasn't materialised as
fast as it had predicted.

"We had expected the 'Vista impact' on DRAM around April, but now we see
it being delayed into the second half," said Hwang Chang-gyu,
semiconductor business president of Samsung Electronics.

But many PC vendors were already skeptical on fresh demand from Vista even
before the product's launch in January, better preparing them for a
potential disappointment, said JP Morgan analyst Charles Guo.

Major PC players like Asustek Computer, also the world's top motherboard
maker, said Vista might have warmed up the market but significant results
have not been seen.

"We aren't seeing any effects yet and compatibility issues will take at
least six months to resolve," said an executive at Asustek, who declined
to be identified.

He added that many corporate customers -- who tend to buy in much larger
volumes than individual consumers and therefore can make a bigger
impact -- were staying on the sidelines for now as individuals accounted
for new buying.

"We've carried out numerous surveys recently with IT managers and they've
all said they are not planning to migrate to Vista, and we are not
expecting a major influx anytime soon," said Bryan Ma, an analyst at IDC,
expressing a similar view.

Different forms of Microsoft's various Windows operating systems now run
more than 90 percent of the world's PCs.

Computer makers are now looking to strong buying from emerging markets
such as China, Eastern Europe and Latin America to boost business.

Dell announced earlier this week a super cheap computer costing as little
as 2,599 yuan ($336) specifically for China, now the world's second
largest PC market by unit sales.

Growth Driver
"Emerging markets are still a key driver for growth in the PC sector.
Global PC shipments this year should grow by low double digits, in the 10
percent range," said Acer's Lanci.

The comment by Acer, which is trying to overtake China's Lenovo as the
world's No. 3 PC maker, was in line with the outlook for the broader
industry.

IDC expects worldwide PC shipments to reach about 253 million units this
year, up 11 percent from 228 million in 2006. That 2007 growth rate is up
from the 9.6 percent posted last year.

Vista's newness aside, analysts also say the right computing platform,
which is needed to run the operating system smoothly, is a main factor
that will determine whether the software will be accepted in the near
term.

"Intel's main Santa Rosa platform needed to support Vista features won't
be launched until May 10, and in the last five to 10 years, the biggest PC
driver is still price," said JP Morgan analyst Alvin Kwock.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates said last month that Vista has been well
received and that PC vendors have seen a nice lift in their sales.

A week before his comments, CEO Steve Ballmer had said that Vista would
only create a "small surge" in PC sales for its fiscal year starting in
July, and would not spur a big increase in normal growth rates.

"Vista was very popular in the first couple of weeks, but let's not just
focus on that. Dell and Hewlett-Packard don't even advertise much on PCs
with Vista," said JP Morgan's Kwock. (Additional reporting by Sophie
Taylor in Shanghai and So Eui Rhee in Seoul)



By: Sheena Lee

Copyright 2007 Reuters. Click for Restrictions

As per CMP's agreement with Reuters, this story will be removed from this
site after 30 days.


Yawn... so Acer says compatibility issues will push the acceptance of Vista
out. Wow, big surprise... uh, crappy drivers from hw vendors... yeah, big
surprise. Snore...

Lang
 
M

mikeyhsd

its typical since these companies are pushing bottom line computers as vista ready/capable when they really are not.
so the customers are upset.

according to news reports, vista so far has outsold xp for the same time frame.



(e-mail address removed)



Another answer to that URBAN lie-guy.... whats his name.. I forget...

http://www.crn.com/software/198701022


After all the hype surrounding its January launch, Microsoft's new Vista
operating system has yet to brighten the outlook for PC makers and could
even lead to oversupplies for those who had built up inventory.

Top PC makers, such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo, may now have to
resort to sales of lower-margin computers in emerging markets such as China,
Eastern Europe and Latin America for their growth this year.

Featuring high-definition video and audio functions and three-dimensional
graphics, Vista is being billed as a major upgrade of its predecessor,
Windows XP.

But the software, which runs on more memory and superior graphic cards, has
not taken off as fast as some had hoped, leading to concerns of potential
inventory woes for makers of those products, analysts and industry players
said.

"Vista has had no big help," said Acer's president Gianfranco Lanci, adding
that PC makers are really not counting on Vista to drive high demands for
the industry.

Samsung Electronics, the world's top memory chip maker, also said that
demand for DRAM computer memory chips from Vista hasn't materialised as fast
as it had predicted.

"We had expected the 'Vista impact' on DRAM around April, but now we see it
being delayed into the second half," said Hwang Chang-gyu, semiconductor
business president of Samsung Electronics.

But many PC vendors were already skeptical on fresh demand from Vista even
before the product's launch in January, better preparing them for a
potential disappointment, said JP Morgan analyst Charles Guo.

Major PC players like Asustek Computer, also the world's top motherboard
maker, said Vista might have warmed up the market but significant results
have not been seen.

"We aren't seeing any effects yet and compatibility issues will take at
least six months to resolve," said an executive at Asustek, who declined to
be identified.

He added that many corporate customers -- who tend to buy in much larger
volumes than individual consumers and therefore can make a bigger impact --
were staying on the sidelines for now as individuals accounted for new
buying.

"We've carried out numerous surveys recently with IT managers and they've
all said they are not planning to migrate to Vista, and we are not expecting
a major influx anytime soon," said Bryan Ma, an analyst at IDC, expressing a
similar view.

Different forms of Microsoft's various Windows operating systems now run
more than 90 percent of the world's PCs.

Computer makers are now looking to strong buying from emerging markets such
as China, Eastern Europe and Latin America to boost business.

Dell announced earlier this week a super cheap computer costing as little as
2,599 yuan ($336) specifically for China, now the world's second largest PC
market by unit sales.

Growth Driver
"Emerging markets are still a key driver for growth in the PC sector. Global
PC shipments this year should grow by low double digits, in the 10 percent
range," said Acer's Lanci.

The comment by Acer, which is trying to overtake China's Lenovo as the
world's No. 3 PC maker, was in line with the outlook for the broader
industry.

IDC expects worldwide PC shipments to reach about 253 million units this
year, up 11 percent from 228 million in 2006. That 2007 growth rate is up
from the 9.6 percent posted last year.

Vista's newness aside, analysts also say the right computing platform, which
is needed to run the operating system smoothly, is a main factor that will
determine whether the software will be accepted in the near term.

"Intel's main Santa Rosa platform needed to support Vista features won't be
launched until May 10, and in the last five to 10 years, the biggest PC
driver is still price," said JP Morgan analyst Alvin Kwock.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates said last month that Vista has been well
received and that PC vendors have seen a nice lift in their sales.

A week before his comments, CEO Steve Ballmer had said that Vista would only
create a "small surge" in PC sales for its fiscal year starting in July, and
would not spur a big increase in normal growth rates.

"Vista was very popular in the first couple of weeks, but let's not just
focus on that. Dell and Hewlett-Packard don't even advertise much on PCs
with Vista," said JP Morgan's Kwock. (Additional reporting by Sophie Taylor
in Shanghai and So Eui Rhee in Seoul)



By: Sheena Lee

Copyright 2007 Reuters. Click for Restrictions

As per CMP's agreement with Reuters, this story will be removed from this
site after 30 days.
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Alias

mikeyhsd said:
its typical since these companies are pushing bottom line computers as
vista ready/capable when they really are not.
so the customers are upset.

according to news reports, vista so far has outsold xp for the same time
frame.

Misleading stats. More people use computers now than in 2001.

Alias
 
G

Guest

Bill said:
When I tested the Vista beta last August, I felt that it would not have
much of a positive impact on the market. I thought that it was a lemon
and that the major effect of its introduction would be to open the door
to alternative operating systems that have been languishing in the
wings. On the following week, I removed the Beta and installed
pclinuxos. Several weeks ago, I installed pclinuxos tr3. I now run XP
in a VMWARE window within pclinuxos. To tell the truth, I was getting
bored with XP, and I felt that Vista was not ready for prime time and
that it was so alien to my normal computer experience and so fraught with
bugs, that I didnt want it anywhere near my computer. Today, I learned
how to connect the printer to my VMWARE window, and I doubt that I will
ever run Windows XP, as a separate boot again. I have learned a lot in
the last 6 months. It was worth it. I now have a very stable system and
I can easily do everything I want with my computer. The OS takes full
advantage of my dual core amd-64 4200 cpu and my 2 gigs of memory.
Everything is fast and I do not notice any slow down when using the XP
window. Pclinuxos has three buttons on the taskbar that help you
configure your computer.

So how do games run in that VMWARE WINDOW ox XP?
1. Configure your computer button set your computer up.
2. Synaptic adds new software and updates existing software.
3. Configure your desktop allows you to set up your desktop anyway that
you like.

Simplicity, easy enough for a beginner.

If you have to learn a new OS, why not learn one that works?

If it's so great why do you run XP in a vmware window?
 
S

Shane Nokes

Yes just as misleading as the rumor that linux distros are gaining market
share just because they have a growing number of users ;)
 
J

Justin

Shane Nokes said:
Yes just as misleading as the rumor that linux distros are gaining market
share just because they have a growing number of users ;)

....and supports more hardware....still not enough.
 
B

Bill

My computer belongs to me. I set it up the way that I want. I have
nothing against anyone doing the same with their computer. I merely
offer alternatives. I have never said that I disliked Windows XP. I use
it to check my bank statement, do my taxes, and access the newsgroups
with Xnews. I was dual booting with it. However, I found that linux
could do most of the the work that I want to do on my computer faster,
more efficiently, and with greater security than Windows XP. Why should
I dual boot with XP, if I only use it for a short time each day. With
VMWARE, I have instant access to Windows XP. In fact, I can leave it on
all the time, and it does not slow me down at all. It is just Windows
within a window. When I make it full screen, you can't tell the
difference. I haven't tested it with games yet, though I might in the
future, and if I do, I will let you know. Windows XP runs a lot better
in a window. I have far fewer problems and crashes. Nice, huh?
 
Ad

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A

Adam Albright

My computer belongs to me. I set it up the way that I want.

Which makes perfect sense. Microsoft always had a corporate view that
still lives on today which boiled down, simply translates to we know
what's best for you more than you know yourself. Of course such a
sweeping view is often dead wrong.

This is what got Microsoft in trouble in the first place. In their
arrogance they turned everything 'on' in XP. Like file sharing. A
hacker's dream. They snuck in a hidden server and tried to bury it
deep in the guts of Windows and didn't tell anybody it was there, but
hackers found it and exploited it and still exploit it. Microsoft made
sure that the Registry would log EVERYTHING about what you do with
your computer and remember all about your data that if asked will
blabber all of it through any one of thousands of ports part of the
system which hackers exploit that are open to anybody connected to the
Internet unless you set up a GOOD firewall.

Bill Gates is on record saying he didn't think that the Internet would
be more than a passing fad to Joe Average and according didn't write
Windows to take advantage of it or protect users from it.

The pigeons have come home to roost. Now Microsoft gives us UAC, which
is suppose to "protect" us from some of Windows build in security
failings and with a wink and a nod they admit if asked that Vista
provides no real security at all, just "warns" you and dumps the ball
in the user's count hoping you'll do the right thing once prompted.
 
N

Nina DiBoy

kirk said:
Another answer to that URBAN lie-guy.... whats his name.. I forget...

http://www.crn.com/software/198701022


After all the hype surrounding its January launch, Microsoft's new Vista
operating system has yet to brighten the outlook for PC makers and could
even lead to oversupplies for those who had built up inventory.

Top PC makers, such as Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo, may now have to
resort to sales of lower-margin computers in emerging markets such as China,
Eastern Europe and Latin America for their growth this year.

Featuring high-definition video and audio functions and three-dimensional
graphics, Vista is being billed as a major upgrade of its predecessor,
Windows XP.

But the software, which runs on more memory and superior graphic cards, has
not taken off as fast as some had hoped, leading to concerns of potential
inventory woes for makers of those products, analysts and industry players
said.

"Vista has had no big help," said Acer's president Gianfranco Lanci, adding
that PC makers are really not counting on Vista to drive high demands for
the industry.

Samsung Electronics, the world's top memory chip maker, also said that
demand for DRAM computer memory chips from Vista hasn't materialised as fast
as it had predicted.

"We had expected the 'Vista impact' on DRAM around April, but now we see it
being delayed into the second half," said Hwang Chang-gyu, semiconductor
business president of Samsung Electronics.

But many PC vendors were already skeptical on fresh demand from Vista even
before the product's launch in January, better preparing them for a
potential disappointment, said JP Morgan analyst Charles Guo.

Major PC players like Asustek Computer, also the world's top motherboard
maker, said Vista might have warmed up the market but significant results
have not been seen.

"We aren't seeing any effects yet and compatibility issues will take at
least six months to resolve," said an executive at Asustek, who declined to
be identified.

He added that many corporate customers -- who tend to buy in much larger
volumes than individual consumers and therefore can make a bigger impact --
were staying on the sidelines for now as individuals accounted for new
buying.

"We've carried out numerous surveys recently with IT managers and they've
all said they are not planning to migrate to Vista, and we are not expecting
a major influx anytime soon," said Bryan Ma, an analyst at IDC, expressing a
similar view.

Different forms of Microsoft's various Windows operating systems now run
more than 90 percent of the world's PCs.

Computer makers are now looking to strong buying from emerging markets such
as China, Eastern Europe and Latin America to boost business.

Dell announced earlier this week a super cheap computer costing as little as
2,599 yuan ($336) specifically for China, now the world's second largest PC
market by unit sales.

Growth Driver
"Emerging markets are still a key driver for growth in the PC sector. Global
PC shipments this year should grow by low double digits, in the 10 percent
range," said Acer's Lanci.

The comment by Acer, which is trying to overtake China's Lenovo as the
world's No. 3 PC maker, was in line with the outlook for the broader
industry.

IDC expects worldwide PC shipments to reach about 253 million units this
year, up 11 percent from 228 million in 2006. That 2007 growth rate is up
from the 9.6 percent posted last year.

Vista's newness aside, analysts also say the right computing platform, which
is needed to run the operating system smoothly, is a main factor that will
determine whether the software will be accepted in the near term.

"Intel's main Santa Rosa platform needed to support Vista features won't be
launched until May 10, and in the last five to 10 years, the biggest PC
driver is still price," said JP Morgan analyst Alvin Kwock.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates said last month that Vista has been well
received and that PC vendors have seen a nice lift in their sales.

A week before his comments, CEO Steve Ballmer had said that Vista would only
create a "small surge" in PC sales for its fiscal year starting in July, and
would not spur a big increase in normal growth rates.

"Vista was very popular in the first couple of weeks, but let's not just
focus on that. Dell and Hewlett-Packard don't even advertise much on PCs
with Vista," said JP Morgan's Kwock. (Additional reporting by Sophie Taylor
in Shanghai and So Eui Rhee in Seoul)



By: Sheena Lee

Copyright 2007 Reuters. Click for Restrictions

As per CMP's agreement with Reuters, this story will be removed from this
site after 30 days.

No surprise there. Thanks for sharing the article though, it was an
interesting read.

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"You can get dog shi* for free also!"

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 
Ad

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N

Nina DiBoy

Bill said:
My computer belongs to me. I set it up the way that I want. I have
nothing against anyone doing the same with their computer. I merely
offer alternatives. I have never said that I disliked Windows XP. I use
it to check my bank statement, do my taxes, and access the newsgroups
with Xnews. I was dual booting with it. However, I found that linux
could do most of the the work that I want to do on my computer faster,
more efficiently, and with greater security than Windows XP. Why should
I dual boot with XP, if I only use it for a short time each day. With
VMWARE, I have instant access to Windows XP. In fact, I can leave it on
all the time, and it does not slow me down at all. It is just Windows
within a window. When I make it full screen, you can't tell the
difference. I haven't tested it with games yet, though I might in the
future, and if I do, I will let you know. Windows XP runs a lot better
in a window. I have far fewer problems and crashes. Nice, huh?

When you do test it, please do post back your experiences! Games is one
of the very few things that makes it difficult for me to fully switch to
linux right now. Thanks!

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"You can get dog shi* for free also!"

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 

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