p4/3ghz


F

Flasherly

Getting summertime, I guess. 85 ambient and with an encode load -this
is with fair to good cooling - hit 135F. Wow. I feel clammy now.
Can't wait until it hits August, and I'm not even running A/C yet.

A early pseudo/dual-core, on not actual dual cores but enhanced
pipelining (hyperthreading), which tricks most diagnostics to
reporting back two cores.

More than probably a 478 as that limits median fan options to
yesterday's cup fans as smaller setups - none of the monster heatpipe
setups of today I got for $20 cheap for S775 boards, which barely fit
into a generic case adhering to standards.

Still, I'd imagine it's hard to keep it under 120F in this class of
pentiums 95watts and dual core AMDs without getting out of the more
common CPU coolers and into some more expensive/demanding coolers.
Like a self-contained $59 water cooler I saw yesterday on sale from
$89.

Still haven't kicked in an actual P4 dual core near my feet, 2.6ghz,
big fan and all on a new(er) MB. Backup sys or plain lazy. You tell
me, but hopefully should be a tad cooler little runnerarounder.
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul

Flasherly said:
Getting summertime, I guess. 85 ambient and with an encode load -this
is with fair to good cooling - hit 135F. Wow. I feel clammy now.
Can't wait until it hits August, and I'm not even running A/C yet.

A early pseudo/dual-core, on not actual dual cores but enhanced
pipelining (hyperthreading), which tricks most diagnostics to
reporting back two cores.

More than probably a 478 as that limits median fan options to
yesterday's cup fans as smaller setups - none of the monster heatpipe
setups of today I got for $20 cheap for S775 boards, which barely fit
into a generic case adhering to standards.

Still, I'd imagine it's hard to keep it under 120F in this class of
pentiums 95watts and dual core AMDs without getting out of the more
common CPU coolers and into some more expensive/demanding coolers.
Like a self-contained $59 water cooler I saw yesterday on sale from
$89.

Still haven't kicked in an actual P4 dual core near my feet, 2.6ghz,
big fan and all on a new(er) MB. Backup sys or plain lazy. You tell
me, but hopefully should be a tad cooler little runnerarounder.
Build yourself a Haswell, when they become available this summer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haswell_(microarchitecture)

If you scroll down to the table, there is a dual core 4570T that
will draw 35W. It's listed as LGA1150. You don't want one listed
as BGA, because those are permanently soldered to their motherboard.
The ones that are LGA1150, you can upgrade later by removing them
from the LGA1150 socket.

Paul
 
M

Mike Tomlinson

Flasherly said:
Still, I'd imagine it's hard to keep it under 120F in this class of
pentiums 95watts and dual core AMDs without getting out of the more
common CPU coolers and into some more expensive/demanding coolers.
The fancy coolers are a waste of money, they do nothing to remove the
heat from the case.

Use the stock cooler and arrange for good airflow through the PC chassis
instead - normally this means a front intake fan and a rear exhaust fan
in addition to the one in the PSU - treat that one as PSU cooling,
rather than chassis cooling.

You might find just adding a rear fan is enough - if not, augment it
with a front fan as well.

They don't even need to be particularly fast spinning - the idea is to
get a constant stream of air flowing through the case to carry away
heat.
 
F

Flasherly

Build yourself a Haswell, when they become available this summer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haswell_(microarchitecture)

If you scroll down to the table, there is a dual core 4570T that
will draw 35W. It's listed as LGA1150. You don't want one listed
as BGA, because those are permanently soldered to their motherboard.
The ones that are LGA1150, you can upgrade later by removing them
from the LGA1150 socket.

Paul
I've had a 35-watter, AMD something or other, lowend, or similar
Celeron D. These P4s do surprising a hair better, and will actually
decode video streams and simultaneous process audio with a level of
complexity the others above could quite reach. I quite actually
dropping money into computers a long time ago. Dollar cost averaging
is about the best I'm good for. These Pentiums may as well have been
given to me. The only thing I'm spending real money on is a good MBs
and good storage. No way to skimp on that. AMD dual core, should
blow away that P4 for-real dually, but neither one cost me more than
$10 or $15. Even at $50 for a damn good new MB, it's all chump change
these days. A IBM 8086 for the very first computer users cost them
$6000 - in today's money, that equates at least to one whizbang
flatscreen for $20,000.

Small wonder, at those prices to build a computer, they're trying to
reinvent the computer motif through handheld satellite subscription
streams? They're making Windows 8 now so it won't even run Intel OP
codes -- you have to go the Microsoft Program Store.
 
Ad

Advertisements

F

Flasherly

The fancy coolers are a waste of money, they do nothing to remove the
heat from the case.

Use the stock cooler and arrange for good airflow through the PC chassis
instead - normally this means a front intake fan and a rear exhaust fan
in addition to the one in the PSU - treat that one as PSU cooling,
rather than chassis cooling.

You might find just adding a rear fan is enough - if not, augment it
with a front fan as well.

They don't even need to be particularly fast spinning - the idea is to
get a constant stream of air flowing through the case to carry away
heat.
Case fans, true, are another matter: a trade-off to cooling, how much,
quickly hotter air is moved out of the case, and dust factoring how
filthy things can indeed get;- then, again, modern case designs for
larger and slower fans are a big improvement in efficiency.

A stock included CPU heatsink/fan, or it's counterpart in a low-priced
unit, I'd suppose at the minimum of effectiveness corresponds to
ambient temperatures, or closely, efficiently in matching the CPU to
ambience without a load. The CPU processing load, (making more
demands and heating it up), then becomes for a factor of central focus
to how good, at added expense a better fan unit advertises itself
[under loads].

Without the processing load my case fan(s) combined with the CPU
cooler are roughly at parity. The HDs' temperatures are the same as
the CPU, which can vary somewhat from the ambient temperatures ranging
from the low 70's to 85 degrees -- they'll all remain steady reading
between 90's, rising to ambient increases for 100 to 105 degrees. I
also double-stack HDs when possible, leave an empty bay between them,
and the case fans are oriented to air IN at the HDs for a sharp right
angle to OUT at the side;- the back for an extra OUT fan I elected to
not mount because of a window behind and next to the computer, blinds
and curtains, and accumulative filth that quickly gathers.

This is a 95-watt single-core P4 3Ghz, which I'll eventually replace
with a similar 95-watt but dual-core P4 2.6Ghz. Sockets 478 to 775,
respectively. For the 775, I so happened to run into a monster
heatpipe setup cheap ($20 - couple bucks more than a stock Intel
replacement). Discounting the dual-cores, if I run the 755 CPU with a
hard enough load to roughly draw both at comparable full power loads,
and, if that CPU fan is all it's cracked up to be (a massive
CoolerMaster), their should be significance.

Say 20 degrees cooler, for the massive CoolerMaster, off of the 135
degrees I mentioned prior in the 478 setup and this smaller
ThermalTake CPU fan, for 115 degrees, in sum and for tops for extreme
loads. A projection of reason. (Of course that may prove not to be the
case and I conceivably could be running 125 or higher. Won't know
until I break it in.)

Only thing different from before with these particular boards are the
MB chipsets, to include onboard video, which on their own right also
run at higher temperatures than earlier MBs. Roughly along with the
CPU, though independently in an expected sense closer and up to 130+
degrees on a regular basis. (I'm running an AGP x8 slotted video board
in this. Oldies but goodies: last of the ATI 9800 series.)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

P4/E S-478 3Ghz ... multicore? 2
Overheating Pentium 4 3ghz 5
Motherboard for P4. 77
P4 upgrade 4
Prefered P4 Motherboard? 3
Overheating problem P4. 2
P4-~3G no fan? 3
P4 3.2 TEMPS? 5

Top