New SATA Install


C

Craig Coope

I've had my old SATA HDD fail so I've been using my IDE instead. I've
kept the failing drive in my PC as it still kinda worked and I was
able to transfer my files off it. I've just got my new SATA drive -
Samsung 1TB and done a straight swap with the failing drive.

Now when the PC boots I get a "Hardware BIOS Initiate Failed, Press
"G" to continue" message and the drive doesn't show in BIOS or
Windows. I've tried changing the SATA cable but no luck.

Any ideas? My PC is 5 years old...is there any reason why the nee
drive won't work when it's SATA like the old?

Thanks.
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

DL

Does your bios support 1tb drives?
Does your sata controler support sata 2 or 3?
Is there a jumper on your new sata to force sata 1?
 
R

R. McCarty

5 years old ? - is the SATA controller motherboard based or is it a
PCI or PCIe add-in card ?

If I understand your post XP was originally on the SATA and the
IDE was an additional physical drive. How did you switch over to
the IDE drive ( Image or alternate XP install ? ). When you changed
the SATA drive you copied the original SATA drive contents to the
new SATA. In it's current configuration is the IDE drive still in the
hardware profile ?
 
T

Terry R.

The date and time was Friday, April 17, 2009 4:30:56 AM, and on a whim,
R. McCarty pounded out on the keyboard:
5 years old ? - is the SATA controller motherboard based or is it a
PCI or PCIe add-in card ?

If I understand your post XP was originally on the SATA and the
IDE was an additional physical drive. How did you switch over to
the IDE drive ( Image or alternate XP install ? ). When you changed
the SATA drive you copied the original SATA drive contents to the
new SATA. In it's current configuration is the IDE drive still in the
hardware profile ?

If it's 5 years old, I see it the other way, IDE was the boot drive,
SATA was added. And it doesn't sound like he's copied anything to the
new drive yet.


Terry R.
 
T

Terry R.

The date and time was Friday, April 17, 2009 4:02:55 AM, and on a whim,
Craig Coope pounded out on the keyboard:
I've had my old SATA HDD fail so I've been using my IDE instead. I've
kept the failing drive in my PC as it still kinda worked and I was
able to transfer my files off it. I've just got my new SATA drive -
Samsung 1TB and done a straight swap with the failing drive.

Now when the PC boots I get a "Hardware BIOS Initiate Failed, Press
"G" to continue" message and the drive doesn't show in BIOS or
Windows. I've tried changing the SATA cable but no luck.

Any ideas? My PC is 5 years old...is there any reason why the nee
drive won't work when it's SATA like the old?

Thanks.

Hi Craig,

Check all your SATA options in your BIOS. Maybe since you connected two
a setting was changed. Also check your RAID options that none of them
are turned on.


Terry R.
 
J

JS

If your PC is 5 years old it most likely
supported SATA-I drives. If the new
SATA drive you bought is SATA-II
then check user's manual for the new
drive and see if there is a jumper setting
to make it SATA-I compatible.
 
Ad

Advertisements

L

Lil' Dave

Craig Coope said:
I've had my old SATA HDD fail so I've been using my IDE instead. I've
kept the failing drive in my PC as it still kinda worked and I was
able to transfer my files off it. I've just got my new SATA drive -
Samsung 1TB and done a straight swap with the failing drive.

Now when the PC boots I get a "Hardware BIOS Initiate Failed, Press
"G" to continue" message and the drive doesn't show in BIOS or
Windows. I've tried changing the SATA cable but no luck.

Any ideas? My PC is 5 years old...is there any reason why the nee
drive won't work when it's SATA like the old?

Thanks.

Does the new 1TB hard drive have a jumper to revert to SATA1? If so, is it
being jumpered that way?
--
Dave
April 16th, 2009 Day 1 post Tea Party.
This day in history occurred:
Nancy Pelosi response was undignified per her allegation that such are
funded by right wing money big money and attended exclusively by right wing
extremists.
White House staff indicated that officially not recognizing the nation-wide
gatherings in any fashion.
Some news reporters were found attempting to goad responses from attendees
at the gatherings with response not filling their (some news reporters) TV
political needs. Too bad for them.
Woebama in Mexico. 2nd amendment rights being pinged again. Ignoring
locking down the U.S/Mexico border again.
We the people...
No political party or otherwise in that.
Locked signature to prevent subsequent historical revisionism.
 
C

Coope

I've had my oldSATAHDD fail so I've been using my IDE instead. I've
kept the failing drive in my PC as it still kinda worked and I was
able to transfer my files off it. I've just got my newSATAdrive -
Samsung 1TB and done a straight swap with the failing drive.

Now when the PC boots I get a "Hardware BIOS Initiate Failed, Press
"G" to continue" message and the drive doesn't show in BIOS or
Windows. I've tried changing theSATAcable but no luck.

Any ideas? My PC is 5 years old...is there any reason why the nee
drive won't work when it'sSATAlike the old?

Thanks.

Thanks to everyone who has replied. I've now got myself into a very
bad situation.

I've been reading online about similar problems and people have
suggested flashing the BIOS....

Yes I can see the horrified looks from here!

I'm reallly not a PC novice and have flashed BIOSs before. I made a
backup just incase and I went ahead and attempted to flash my
BIOS...it read the file from the floppy and then started to erase my
BIOS ROM...after 10 seconds it said Flashing failed and then
nothing....I reset the PC after 10 seconds or so and now it's dead.

It won't POST....It won't send a signal to the monitor...the keyboard
doesn't seem to be on as the LEDs for scroll lock etc don't come
on.....it doesn't beep at all either.

I pretty much know I'll need a new BIOS chip or mobo....but before
that, is there anything I can try to get the PC to react so that I can
reflash the backup of the BIOS?

Craig,
 
C

Coope

Thanks to everyone who has replied. I've now got myself into a very
bad situation.

I've been reading online about similar problems and people have
suggested flashing the BIOS....

Yes I can see the horrified looks from here!

I'm reallly not a PC novice and have flashed BIOSs before. I made a
backup just incase and I went ahead and attempted to flash my
BIOS...it read the file from the floppy and then started to erase my
BIOS ROM...after 10 seconds it said Flashing failed and then
nothing....I reset the PC after 10 seconds or so and now it's dead.

It won't POST....It won't send a signal to the monitor...the keyboard
doesn't seem to be on as the LEDs for scroll lock etc don't come
on.....it doesn't beep at all either.

I pretty much know I'll need a new BIOS chip or mobo....but before
that, is there anything I can try to get the PC to react so that I can
reflash the backup of the BIOS?

Craig,

Sorry, when I say dead I mean the usual lights come on and the fans
and the devices power up but I get no output.

Craig
--
 
J

JS

Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.
 
C

Coope

Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.

I don't have that unfortunately...

I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....

If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.

Is there anything I am missing?
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

JS

You could try flashing the BIOS again, but this time
double check you have the correct BIOS for your
motherboard.
 
A

Alister

Coope said:
I don't have that unfortunately...

I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....

If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.

Is there anything I am missing?

If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister
 
C

Coope

Coopewrote:
I don't have that unfortunately...
I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....
If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.
Is there anything I am missing?

If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister

Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....
 
A

Alister

Coope said:
If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister

Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....

DOH!

Well, I think you'd better start pricing motherboards then, sorry.

There is this link:

http://www.wimsbios.com/faq/howtorecoveracorruptbios.jsp



Alister
 
J

JS

A few motherboards have BIOS chips that
are in socket and can be removed. If that is
so on your motherboard then place a call to
the board manufacture and see how much it cost
for a replacement BIOS chip.

--
JS
http://www.pagestart.com


Coope said:
Coopewrote:
Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.
I don't have that unfortunately...
I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....
If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.
Is there anything I am missing?

If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister

Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....
 
Ad

Advertisements

L

Lil' Dave

Thinking similar here, except getting a replacement chip already flashed
appropriate for the said motherboard. Easy to find such on the internet.
This is not usually sold by the mobo maker.

There is another alternative if you can find a PC with identical motherboard
and bios version. Involves lending the bios chip temporarily from that PC.
Too much can go wrong though for a PC hardware novice, nevermind.

--
Dave
April 16th, 2009 Day 1 post Tea Party.
This day in history occurred:
Nancy Pelosi response was undignified per her allegation that such are
funded by right wing money big money and attended exclusively by right wing
extremists.
White House staff indicated that officially not recognizing the nation-wide
gatherings in any fashion.
Some news reporters were found attempting to goad responses from attendees
at the gatherings with response not filling their (some news reporters) TV
political needs. Too bad for them.
Woebama in Mexico. 2nd amendment rights being pinged again. Ignoring
locking down the U.S/Mexico border again.
We the people...
No political party or otherwise in that.
Locked signature to prevent subsequent historical revisionism.

JS said:
A few motherboards have BIOS chips that
are in socket and can be removed. If that is
so on your motherboard then place a call to
the board manufacture and see how much it cost
for a replacement BIOS chip.

--
JS
http://www.pagestart.com


Coope said:
Coopewrote:
Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.

I don't have that unfortunately...

I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....

If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.

Is there anything I am missing?

If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister

Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....
 
P

Paul

Coope said:
Coopewrote:
Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.
I don't have that unfortunately...
I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....
If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.
Is there anything I am missing?
If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.

If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:

awflash [updatename].bin

(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)

Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.

Alister

Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....

On older motherboards, the BIOS could be a dual inline or "DIP" package.
If it is socketed, it can be pried up out of the socket. (I used
to use a flat blade staple remover, to slide under the chip and
pry alternately on either end of the chip, to pull it out of
the socket.)

http://www.biosflash.com/images/dil_socket.gif

More recent motherboards, use a PLCC chip in a socket. In some cases,
the chip is soldered right to the motherboard, which makes replacement
a job for someone with the right tools. If the chip is in a socket, it
can be removed. The brown plastic is the body of the socket.

http://www.biosflash.com/images/plcc_socket.jpg

This is a Radioshack PLCC puller, with hooks that fits under the
diagonal corners of a PLCC. But you can also use a small pointed
tool to do the extraction as well.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062619

The most recent motherboards use an 8 pin DIP, and this EEPROM
is serially connected to the motherboard. Based on a few pictures
I've looked at, these are soldered to the motherboard most
of the time. There may be a programming header near the chip,
which means the intention may be for a programmer to be
connected, to fix one. When I priced a programmer with
pin header interface, it was about $150.00. People who
brick those motherboards, have been sending them back
under warranty.

Companies like this one, can program a new chip for immediate
insertion into the socket. You have to tell them the chip
type (read the number printed on the chip itself, and not
any paper label pasted over top of the chip number), and
give them a pointer to a BIOS download, so they
can prepare the chip. As long as the chip is socketed,
the procedure is relatively painless.

http://www.badflash.com/

If the floppy drive makes access noises during system
startup, then it might be worth trying a "boot block"
recovery procedure. If there is no sound from the
floppy, then it is more likely the boot block is in
an erased state. Percentage wise, not too many people
succeed with the boot block method.

While some Gigabyte motherboards have "dual BIOS" chips,
the architecture is not truly redundant. One chip has
a boot block, two chips have main BIOS code. It is still
possible to brick those motherboards, even though they
physically have two chips.

If no BIOS tool ever touched the boot block, then all
motherboards would be recoverable. But that isn't how
they (ab)use the boot block concept. Many BIOS update
tools are set to erase the boot block by default. If the
BIOS update fails, before the boot block is put back,
then the board is bricked. And then it is time for
badflash.com and the like.

Paul
 
C

Coope

Coopewrote:
Coopewrote:
Some motherboards have a "Dual" BIOS, with the
second BIOS chip used as a backup for situations
just like yours. Check the motherboard or PC user's guide.
I don't have that unfortunately...
I've tried everything and I can't get it to respond. Cleared CMOS and
even took the battery out for 7 hours....
If it would just give me the bad checksum error I could sort it but
it's dead....Well the parts are working but there's nobody home.
Is there anything I am missing?
If you are lucky, your BIOS may contain a "Boot Block" which is not
overwritten by the flash utility.
If this is the case it will not drive a PCI, AGP or PCI-E display, so
you won't see anything, but it will read the floppy drive.
If you have your BIOS .bin or .rom file on a floppy, along with the
flash utility (awflash for Award bios's) then you need to create an
autoexec.bat file on the floppy with a single line in it:
awflash [updatename].bin
(for example - I don't know which flash utility you've got)
Then just bung the floppy in the drive and turn on the machine.
Hopefully it will re-flash the Bios and bob's your mother's brother.
Alister
Sounds like a good suggestion but the floppy drive doesn't come
on...only the DVD and hard drives....

On older motherboards, the BIOS could be a dual inline or "DIP" package.
If it is socketed, it can be pried up out of the socket. (I used
to use a flat blade staple remover, to slide under the chip and
pry alternately on either end of the chip, to pull it out of
the socket.)

http://www.biosflash.com/images/dil_socket.gif

More recent motherboards, use a PLCC chip in a socket. In some cases,
the chip is soldered right to the motherboard, which makes replacement
a job for someone with the right tools. If the chip is in a socket, it
can be removed. The brown plastic is the body of the socket.

http://www.biosflash.com/images/plcc_socket.jpg

This is a Radioshack PLCC puller, with hooks that fits under the
diagonal corners of a PLCC. But you can also use a small pointed
tool to do the extraction as well.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062619

The most recent motherboards use an 8 pin DIP, and this EEPROM
is serially connected to the motherboard. Based on a few pictures
I've looked at, these are soldered to the motherboard most
of the time. There may be a programming header near the chip,
which means the intention may be for a programmer to be
connected, to fix one. When I priced a programmer with
pin header interface, it was about $150.00. People who
brick those motherboards, have been sending them back
under warranty.

Companies like this one, can program a new chip for immediate
insertion into the socket. You have to tell them the chip
type (read the number printed on the chip itself, and not
any paper label pasted over top of the chip number), and
give them a pointer to a BIOS download, so they
can prepare the chip. As long as the chip is socketed,
the procedure is relatively painless.

http://www.badflash.com/

If the floppy drive makes access noises during system
startup, then it might be worth trying a "boot block"
recovery procedure. If there is no sound from the
floppy, then it is more likely the boot block is in
an erased state. Percentage wise, not too many people
succeed with the boot block method.

While some Gigabyte motherboards have "dual BIOS" chips,
the architecture is not truly redundant. One chip has
a boot block, two chips have main BIOS code. It is still
possible to brick those motherboards, even though they
physically have two chips.

If no BIOS tool ever touched the boot block, then all
motherboards would be recoverable. But that isn't how
they (ab)use the boot block concept. Many BIOS update
tools are set to erase the boot block by default. If the
BIOS update fails, before the boot block is put back,
then the board is bricked. And then it is time for
badflash.com and the like.

Paul

Thanks to everyone's input. I've just ordered a replacement chip and
have just taken out my duff one (which was rather easy) so the hard
part is over. I've requested the new chip have the lastest BIOS on it
already and hopefully it will sort out my original SATA HDD problem
but me thinks I won't be that lucky!...

I've been reading loads online over the last 2 days of ASUS' BIOS
updates bricking mobos....and the fact that their BIOS crashfree thing
doesn't seem to work for loads of people!....

Well if I can get the PC back up and running for only £10 then I'm
happy....
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Coope

Thanks to everyone's input. I've just ordered a replacement chip and
have just taken out my duff one (which was rather easy) so the hard
part is over. I've requested the new chip have the lastest BIOS on it
already and hopefully it will sort out my originalSATAHDD problem
but me thinks I won't be that lucky!...

I've been reading loads online over the last 2 days of ASUS' BIOS
updates bricking mobos....and the fact that their BIOS crashfree thing
doesn't seem to work for loads of people!....

Well if I can get the PC back up and running for only £10 then I'm
happy....- Hide quoted text -

Apologies for replying to myself but I'd just like to go back to my
SATA problem. I've borrowed my brother's old PC which is newer than
mine and plugged my new SATA drive right into it and it worked. The PC
had only ever had an IDE drive in before. So I can confirm that the
drive itself and the cable works fine.

I may be back onto this thread in a few days when I get my PC back up
again if I need more help. Then I'll go back and read the previous
stuff posted on here that I didn't get a chance to reply to (as I had
bigger problems!)

Thanks again.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top