Need to set up DHCP on domain controller???


C

Chris

Hello all,

Got a question. I have 2 businesses (owned by different members of
the same family) that are working out of the same office space. They
have 2 T1s, 2 routers, 2 switches, etc. I have 1 server connected to
both networks (using separate NICs). The server is W2000 Server & has
AD installed. Right now, we're just using it for file & print
sharing. Both networks are currently set up as workgroups.

Since 1 of the networks has moved to all XP & W2K Pro, I'd like to put
them on a domain. I cannot move both as the other network has a bunch
of XP Home machines.

Right now, both networks are on different subnets & have DHCP running
on their own routers. All workstations are set up to retrieve IP
addresses automatically.

With the current configuration, can I move that one workgroup to a
domain without changing where DHCP is running? I'm not sure if DHCP
MUST be running on the domain controller.

I'm worried that if I disable DHCP on the routers & run it on the
server, we'll run into problems since I want to keep 1 network as a
workgroup & put the other on the domain.

Would appreciate any help.

Thanks!

Chris
 
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R

Richard G. Harper

No, DHCP does not need to be running in an Active Directory domain but DNS
must.
 
S

Steven L Umbach

I strongly suggest that you setup DHCP on your domain controller. In AD a DHCP server
has many more options that a router and also acts as a proxy to register reverse zone
pointer records in dns for domain clients. Now you can get by without a reverse zone
and secure dynamic updates and possibly get your domain to work acceptably but it is
not that hard to do it right.

http://www.microsoft.com/windows200...ver/help/sag_DHCP_imp_InteroperabilityDNS.htm

Since you are on separate subnets with individual routers, you can still leave the
other network to have the router be it's DHCP server. Keep in mind that in W2K AD
domain dns configuration is crucial and the domain controller must point to itself
and the domain members must point to the domain controller ONLY as their preferred
dns server in tcp/ip properties either via static configuration or via DHCP scope
otherwise you will have a LOT of access problems. See the link below for more
specifics on W2K dns including how to set it up to allow domain clients to access the
internet via configuring the AD domain controller to use "root hints" or forward to
ISP dns server. -- Steve

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;291382
 
C

Chris

Thanks, Steve. I was guessing that I should be running DHCP on the
DC. My question though is that if I disable DHCP on my router
functioning on the "on-domain" subnet & activate DHCP on the DC, will
the other "off-domain" subnet workstations get confused?

They are still attached to the server (functioning as a DC for the
other subnet) and still using it as a file/print server. If I'm
following you correctly, I will still leave DHCP enabled on the router
for that subnet...which will connect to that subnet's switch. Then
the server will also be connected to that subnet's switch. Will the
DHCP running on the server cause problems? Or is there a way to
configure that NIC to "avoid" the DHCP running on the server?

Sorry if this makes no sense. Definitely no expert in this kind of
stuff...and especially with this kind of situation.

Thanks much!

Chris.




Since you are on separate subnets with individual routers, you can
still leave the other network to have the router be it's DHCP server.
Keep in mind that in W2K AD domain dns configuration is crucial and
the domain controller must point to itself and the domain members must
point to the domain controller ONLY as their preferred dns server in
tcp/ip properties either via static configuration or via DHCP scope
otherwise you will have a LOT of access problems. See the link below
for more specifics on W2K dns including how to set it up to allow
domain clients to access the internet via configuring the AD domain
controller to use "root hints" or forward to ISP dns server. --
Steve

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;291382
 
C

Chris Edson [MSFT]

If you configure the DHCP Server to only service the subnet connected via
the one NIC, then it won't try to service via the second NIC. There should
be no interference between to two, as long as you don't set it up to service
that second subnet.

You can choose which NIC is 'bound' to DHCP Server via the Server Properties
dialog, Advanced Tab, within the DHCP Snap-in.

-Chris

--
==============================
Chris Edson
(e-mail address removed)

This posting is provided "AS IS" with
no warranties, and confers no rights.
===============================
 
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S

Steven L Umbach

Well I have never set up a domain controller being a router with two nics. But it
should work as long as you configure the domain controller to use the same subnet
network address that the router now uses when you configure the scope. DHCP works on
broadcasts in that the clients on the subnet broadcast to get their IP information
from the DHCP server. Those broadcasts will not be routed, so as far as the "non
domain" subnet is concerned it is business as usual. I think you can bind the DHCP
server to a particular network adapter and in network configuration/advanced
properties you want the nic that services your domain subnet to be at the top of the
list. When you make the change I would go into the DHCP Management Console and in the
server properties/advanced enable conflict detection attempts and set it to one for
at least a week or so after the changeover. --- Steve
 
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