Need Help Connecting Front USB to MOBO Header


J

Jethro

I am working with a K7S5A motherboard that has one USB header on it.

The pins are probably (assuming the pdf-file I have printed is right):
1 VERG_FP_USBWR0 2 VERG-FP_USBWR0
3 USB_FP_PO- 4 USB_FP_P1-
5 USB_FP_P0+ 6 USB_FP_P1+
7 GROUND 8 GROUND
9 KEY 10 USB_FP_OC0

Except that actually the MOBO header has no pin 9.

The case I have has two front USB ports.
Their wires are labeled:
1 + D 1 - D 1 ground 1 + VCC
2 + D 2 - D 2 ground 2 + VCC

I want to connect one of the front USB ports to the MOBO header.

Since I see warnings that the wires MUST be connected correctly, I
have to ask - Which wires must I connect to which header-pins?
I can guess, but I am afraid to.

Thanks

Jethro
 
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P

Paul

Jethro said:
I am working with a K7S5A motherboard that has one USB header on it.

The pins are probably (assuming the pdf-file I have printed is right):
1 VERG_FP_USBWR0 2 VERG-FP_USBWR0
3 USB_FP_PO- 4 USB_FP_P1-
5 USB_FP_P0+ 6 USB_FP_P1+
7 GROUND 8 GROUND
9 KEY 10 USB_FP_OC0

Except that actually the MOBO header has no pin 9.

The case I have has two front USB ports.
Their wires are labeled:
1 + D 1 - D 1 ground 1 + VCC
2 + D 2 - D 2 ground 2 + VCC

I want to connect one of the front USB ports to the MOBO header.

Since I see warnings that the wires MUST be connected correctly, I
have to ask - Which wires must I connect to which header-pins?
I can guess, but I am afraid to.

Thanks

Jethro

I have a couple of K7S5A manuals on my hard drive here, and
pin 1 and 2 are VERG_FP_USBPWR0. PWR as in power, which is
the same thing as "+5" or "VCC".

VERG_FP_USBPWR0 = VCC
USB_FP_PO- = D-
USB_FP_P0+ = D+
GROUND = ground

USB_FP_OC0 = "make no user connection"

To prepare a single USB interface, select either the set of
pins 1,3,5,7 or the set of pins 2,4,6,8. Connect a consistent
set of pins from your case wiring to the motherboard header.
At the very least, do not mix up the signals between 3,5 and
2,4. Pins 3 and 5 belong to one interface, while 4 and 6
are the second USB interface (data signals).

The USB_FP_OC0 on the motherboard is a bit tricky. If the
computer case USB connector/module had the ability to detect
an overcurrent situation, then you would connect the computer
case "OC#" to the USB_FP_OC0. If you by accident connected a
ground on the computer case, to the USB_FP_OC0 pin, the USB
port will be shut off. That is why my recommendation above,
is to make no connection to that pin. With nothing connected
to USB_FP_OC0, the USB ports will continue to be enabled,
which is what you want.

Paul
 
J

Jethro

I have a couple of K7S5A manuals on my hard drive here, and
pin 1 and 2 are VERG_FP_USBPWR0. PWR as in power, which is
the same thing as "+5" or "VCC".

VERG_FP_USBPWR0 = VCC
USB_FP_PO- = D-
USB_FP_P0+ = D+
GROUND = ground

USB_FP_OC0 = "make no user connection"

To prepare a single USB interface, select either the set of
pins 1,3,5,7 or the set of pins 2,4,6,8. Connect a consistent
set of pins from your case wiring to the motherboard header.
At the very least, do not mix up the signals between 3,5 and
2,4. Pins 3 and 5 belong to one interface, while 4 and 6
are the second USB interface (data signals).

The USB_FP_OC0 on the motherboard is a bit tricky. If the
computer case USB connector/module had the ability to detect
an overcurrent situation, then you would connect the computer
case "OC#" to the USB_FP_OC0. If you by accident connected a
ground on the computer case, to the USB_FP_OC0 pin, the USB
port will be shut off. That is why my recommendation above,
is to make no connection to that pin. With nothing connected
to USB_FP_OC0, the USB ports will continue to be enabled,
which is what you want.

Paul
Thanks Paul.

Can I connect both case USB's to the one header? I.E. using
1,3,5,7 for USB1 and 2,4,6,8 for USB2?

I won't try the second until you reply.

Jethro
 
J

Jethro

I have a couple of K7S5A manuals on my hard drive here, and
pin 1 and 2 are VERG_FP_USBPWR0. PWR as in power, which is
the same thing as "+5" or "VCC".

VERG_FP_USBPWR0 = VCC
USB_FP_PO- = D-
USB_FP_P0+ = D+
GROUND = ground

USB_FP_OC0 = "make no user connection"

To prepare a single USB interface, select either the set of
pins 1,3,5,7 or the set of pins 2,4,6,8. Connect a consistent
set of pins from your case wiring to the motherboard header.
At the very least, do not mix up the signals between 3,5 and
2,4. Pins 3 and 5 belong to one interface, while 4 and 6
are the second USB interface (data signals).

The USB_FP_OC0 on the motherboard is a bit tricky. If the
computer case USB connector/module had the ability to detect
an overcurrent situation, then you would connect the computer
case "OC#" to the USB_FP_OC0. If you by accident connected a
ground on the computer case, to the USB_FP_OC0 pin, the USB
port will be shut off. That is why my recommendation above,
is to make no connection to that pin. With nothing connected
to USB_FP_OC0, the USB ports will continue to be enabled,
which is what you want.

Paul

Paul - I connected just one of the two front USBs to 1,3,5,7 on the
MOBO header, following your directions. WXP recognized 'new hardware'
when I plug a USB peripheral into a rear USB port, but not when I plug
the same device into either of the front USB ports. Do I have to do
something extra to get Device Manager to pick up the front USB ports?
It didn't.

Thanks

Jethro
 
P

Paul

Jethro said:
Paul - I connected just one of the two front USBs to 1,3,5,7 on the
MOBO header, following your directions. WXP recognized 'new hardware'
when I plug a USB peripheral into a rear USB port, but not when I plug
the same device into either of the front USB ports. Do I have to do
something extra to get Device Manager to pick up the front USB ports?
It didn't.

Thanks

Jethro

Some early chipsets had an option in the BIOS, to enable 2, 4,
or 6 ports. That is the only option I can think of in the
BIOS that might affect it.

In Device Manager, you should have a number of entries to match the
capabilities of the chipset. If the chipset supports six ports,
then I'd expect to see some correspondence in the Device Manager.
Some of the pictures on this page, are for a computer with motherboard
USB plus a separate PCI USB card, which is why there are so many
Device Manager entries.

http://www.usbman.com/Guides/checking_for_usb_2.htm

And yes, you can connect both sets of wires to the
2x5 header on your motherboard.

/ X X \
First ____/ X X \____ Second Port
Port \ X X /
\ X X /
X

On some motherboards, there is a USBPWR jumper that controls
the flow of power to the 2x5 header. You should make sure, that
if such a jumper scheme is used, that a jumper plug is installed
on the header. I don't see one of those on your K7S5A motherboard.

Another possible source of a non-working front USB port, is a
miswired or mislabelled computer case. I have a couple Antec
cases here, that had front port wiring problems. To figure that
out, I used my ohmmeter. I connect one lead of the ohmmeter to
the pin in the USB connector, then use the other lead of the
ohmmeter, and check for continuity. Sometimes, you may find the
D+ and D- are reversed. You need to find a diagram of the USB
connector standard, so you'll know which signal is which.

PDF page 27 here has a picture of a USB connector with pinout:

http://developer.apple.com/document...ntosh_CPUs-G4/PowerMacG4Sept02/PowerMacG4.pdf

HTH,
Paul
 
J

Jethro

Some early chipsets had an option in the BIOS, to enable 2, 4,
or 6 ports. That is the only option I can think of in the
BIOS that might affect it.

In Device Manager, you should have a number of entries to match the
capabilities of the chipset. If the chipset supports six ports,
then I'd expect to see some correspondence in the Device Manager.
Some of the pictures on this page, are for a computer with motherboard
USB plus a separate PCI USB card, which is why there are so many
Device Manager entries.

http://www.usbman.com/Guides/checking_for_usb_2.htm

And yes, you can connect both sets of wires to the
2x5 header on your motherboard.

/ X X \
First ____/ X X \____ Second Port
Port \ X X /
\ X X /
X

On some motherboards, there is a USBPWR jumper that controls
the flow of power to the 2x5 header. You should make sure, that
if such a jumper scheme is used, that a jumper plug is installed
on the header. I don't see one of those on your K7S5A motherboard.

Another possible source of a non-working front USB port, is a
miswired or mislabelled computer case. I have a couple Antec
cases here, that had front port wiring problems. To figure that
out, I used my ohmmeter. I connect one lead of the ohmmeter to
the pin in the USB connector, then use the other lead of the
ohmmeter, and check for continuity. Sometimes, you may find the
D+ and D- are reversed. You need to find a diagram of the USB
connector standard, so you'll know which signal is which.

PDF page 27 here has a picture of a USB connector with pinout:

http://developer.apple.com/document...ntosh_CPUs-G4/PowerMacG4Sept02/PowerMacG4.pdf

HTH,
Paul

Device Manager on my system only shows

SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller
SiS 7001 PCI to USB Open Host Controller
USB Root Hub
USB Root Hub

which matches the two USB ports on the rear of the K7S5A MOBO. Both
Ports seem to accept a USB peripheral device just fine.

That means the machine is not recognizing the front USB ports at all.
I had already looked at the BIOS hoping to see some way to activate
the headers, but don't see anything.

Thanks again

Jethro
 
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R

Rod Speed

Jethro said:
I am working with a K7S5A motherboard that has one USB header on it.
The pins are probably (assuming the pdf-file I have printed is right):
1 VERG_FP_USBWR0 2 VERG-FP_USBWR0
3 USB_FP_PO- 4 USB_FP_P1-
5 USB_FP_P0+ 6 USB_FP_P1+
7 GROUND 8 GROUND
9 KEY 10 USB_FP_OC0
Except that actually the MOBO header has no pin 9.

That's normal. Its a key in the sense that the hole in the header plug
is plugged, so a pin cant go into it, so the pin needs to be missing.
The case I have has two front USB ports.
Their wires are labeled:
1 + D 1 - D 1 ground 1 + VCC
2 + D 2 - D 2 ground 2 + VCC
I want to connect one of the front USB ports to the MOBO header.
Since I see warnings that the wires MUST be connected correctly,
I have to ask - Which wires must I connect to which header-pins?

The + and - pins connect to the ones with the + and - in the name.

The grounds are obvious.

Pins 1 and 2 are the VCC, usually labelled.

Ignore pin 10, its the over current line and isnt usually used.
I can guess, but I am afraid to.

Yeah, its important to not cross connect the VCC and
ground, you can blow the trace right off the motherboard.
 
R

Rod Speed

I connected just one of the two front USBs to 1,3,5,7 on the MOBO
header, following your directions. WXP recognized 'new hardware'
when I plug a USB peripheral into a rear USB port, but not when
I plug the same device into either of the front USB ports.

You wont necessarily get the new hardware popup
when you have put the device onto one of the USB
ports and then plug it into a different USB port.
Do I have to do something extra to get Device Manager
to pick up the front USB ports? It didn't.

One obvious possibility is that you didnt connect it correctly
with a device thats never been on a USB port previously.
 
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J

Jethro

You wont necessarily get the new hardware popup
when you have put the device onto one of the USB
ports and then plug it into a different USB port.


One obvious possibility is that you didnt connect it correctly
with a device thats never been on a USB port previously.


You are absolutely right. Both front USBs work, but not
consistently.

I find if I boot up with the USB peripheral device connected to either
of the front USBs, WXP recognizes the presence of new hardware.
My job is done.

Thanks

Jethro
 

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