msconfig Startup list - what happens if you deactivate an entry


G

Guest

Help, please.

Many sites say that you can speed things up if you deactivate some of the
entries in the MSconfig Startup tab

So can you help me with a few questions:
a) do you deactivate an entry just by clearing the tick?
b) can someone tell me which ones must not be deactivated?
c) and exactly what happens when you untick an entry in the list?. Will it
start up quite happily when you need it (say when you click on a program icon
or open a file from Explorer).
 
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R

Rich Barry

Simon, answer to A: Yes, by unticking you stop the program from starting
at boot. That answers C: also. and it will work
fine when you choose to open the
program,
B: Usually Antivirus and firewalls.
 
W

Wesley Vogel

System Configuration Utility (msconfig.exe) is not the place to do this.

a) Yes.
b) Up to you.
c) Yes. Although some programs may not realize that the entries have been
UNChecked here, they will go ahead and start anyway.

MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled.

The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place.

For those who do not wish to mess around in the registry, StartMan is a good
deal. It only runs when you start it. It does not have to run in the
background. It can remove the startups for you, not only just disable
them. Whether it's a link in a startup folder or a path in the registry.

StartMan v1.3.96
http://www.pt.lu/comnet/desc/startman.html

From StartMan Help:
[[StartMan is a startup manager created to address some of the shortcomings
in Microsoft's original System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG.EXE).
MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled. Under normal circumstances all startup items should be enabled as
it is difficult to troubleshoot a system's startup while some items are
disabled on a more permanent basis. Such non-essential items should be
removed completely, in order to both release MSCONFIG for its primary
purpose of troubleshooting, and to remove any confusion where duplication
occurs. Where an item is essential, the program that requires it will quite
often re-instate the item. But since it knows nothing of the disabled item,
you end up with a duplicate. A duplicate is simply an item that is both
enabled and disabled (not as impossible as it sounds, since enabled and
disabled items are stored in separate locations). {{{Doesn't have to be an
essential item, some scumware can and will re-enable their startup keys.
Wes}}}

MSCONFIG also doesn't show where each of the startup items are actually
located (versions previous to Windows Me's version). This can be an
important factor when determining whether a startup item is essential to the
system or not. {{{XP's version of msconfig does show the locations, but if
you're not familiar with the registry, they are hard to read. Wes}}}

StartMan addresses all these issues by displaying each group of startups
separately and by permitting the user to delete non-essential items as well
as temporarily disabling the essentials. It is fully-compliant with MSCONFIG
with regards the location of disabled items and, where a duplication occurs,
will automatically offer to remove the disabled item for you (a feature
unique to StartMan). StartMan also displays additional startup groups that
MSCONFIG simply doesn't touch.

IMPORTANT
The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place. The reason for this is that the program
would otherwise be unaware of the changes you'd made with StartMan or any
other startup managers, and some will actually restore their startups
automatically, thus creating duplicates. Therefore always check the main
program's own options or preferences, or the system tray icon's options (if
the program has one) before resorting to any startup manager - including
this one. Startup managers should ONLY be used to disable startups
temporarily - such as when troubleshooting - or to remove non-essential
startups that have no removal options whatsoever. ]]

Where an enabled startup might live >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

Where a disabled item from that location gets stored >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run-
 
G

Guest

Guys, hi there

Many thanks for the useful pointers. Especially that bit about the programs
restoring their settings (leading to duplicates).

It is my niece's PC I am looking at, so will track down the programs that
created the entries and deal with them from there.

One of them is BackWeb, which I think came from some Kodak photoediting s/w.
Others (MyWebSearch, ActivSurf) may have been on the PC from the initial
install (it's a Packard Bell PC). I hope to track them down too.
 
W

Wesley Vogel

She has scumware on her machine. BackWeb is spyware and MyWebSearch &
ActivSurf are search hijackers. You can do a Google Search for these.

Some of this does not apply if you have Windows XP SP2.

First. Make sure of these settings and nothing will install without you
answering YES. (Except what may install as part of some other software.)
Don't click YES if you don't know/trust the source.

Start | Settings | Control Panel | Internet Options | Advanced tab |
Make sure both of these are NOT checked.

 Enable Install On Demand (Internet Explorer)
[[Specifies to automatically download and install Internet Explorer
components if a Web page needs them in order to display the page properly or
perform a particular task.]]

 Enable Install On Demand (Other)
[[Specifies to automatically download and install Web components if a Web
page needs them in order to display the page properly or perform a
particular task.]]

Apply | OK

 Enable Install On Demand (Other)
Is part of the driveby downloading of unwanted programs. i.e. Scumware or
whatever will install w/o you even being aware of it.
=====

Second. If you need a scan right now.

Follow the instructions!
THE PARASITE FIGHT QUICK FIX PROTOCOL
http://aumha.org/a/quickfix.php

=====

Third.
It is known as scumware. Visit these sites. 1, 2, 3 and 4 are really good.
Download, install, run, update and run again; one or all. They are all
good, FREE utilities. Make sure you update every program, even if you
just downloaded it. You must have the latest updates. Without updates,
you have a gun without ammo. You also need to use more than one
anti scumware program. One program will *not* catch everything.

1) CWShredder ver. 1.59 direct download:
http://www.merijn.org/files/cwshredder.zip

1a) CWShredder ver. 2.0 direct download:
http://www.aumha.org/downloads/cwshredder.zip

2) SpywareBlaster
[[SpywareBlaster doesn't scan and clean for spyware - it prevents it from
ever being installed.
The most important step you can take is to secure your system. And
SpywareBlaster is the most powerful protection program available.]]
http://www.javacoolsoftware.com/spywareblaster.html

3) Spybot S & D (More for the advanced user)
http://www.safer-networking.org/index.php?lang=en&page=download

4) HijackThis (some other stuff that may be of interest also)
http://www.spywareinfo.com/~merijn/downloads.html

4a) HijackThis (direct download)
http://aumha.org/downloads/hijackthis.zip

5) Bazooka Adware and Spyware Scanner v1.13
http://www.kephyr.com/spywarescanner/index.html?source=appvisit

6) ToolbarCop
http://www.mvps.org/sramesh2k/toolbarcop.htm

7) Ad-aware SE Personal
http://www.lavasoft.de/support/download/

=====

HijackThis log tutorial
http://www.spywareinfo.com/~merijn/htlogtutorial.html

HijackThis Log Tutorial
http://www.aumha.org/a/hjttutor.htm

How to use HijackThis to remove Browser Hijackers & Spyware
http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/index.php?showtutorial=42#warning

How To Install Spybot Search and Destroy & a brief tutorial
http://tomcoyote.com/SPYBOT/index1.php

HOW TO: Reconfigure Ad-aware for a Full Scan
http://forum.aumha.org/viewtopic.php?t=5877
=====

MVPS HOSTS file is a free download from:
http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/

Blocking Unwanted Parasites with a Hosts File
http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm
=====

Problems uninstalling? Here's some advice.
http://www.kephyr.com/spywarescanner/uninstallproblems.phtml

Additional information & instructions.
A wealth of information here, boys and girls.

THE PARASITE FIGHT QUICK FIX PROTOCOL
http://aumha.org/a/quickfix.htm

THE PARASITE FIGHT
Finding, Removing & Protecting Yourself From Scumware
http://aumha.org/a/parasite.htm

Bugs, Glitches & Stuffups
http://www.mvps.org/inetexplorer/Darnit.htm

Dealing with Unwanted Spyware and Parasites
http://mvps.org/winhelp2002/unwanted.htm

Unexplained computer behavior may be caused by deceptive software
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;827315

Spyware and Deceptive Software
http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/twc/privacy/spyware.mspx?gssnb=1

What you should know about spyware
http://www.microsoft.com/security/articles/spyware.asp

Cleaning Up XP
http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_c.htm#cleanup
 
G

Guest

Phew!

That will be keep me busy for a while.

Once again, Wes, many thanks for the help and advice,
 
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G

Guest

Wesley Vogel said:
System Configuration Utility (msconfig.exe) is not the place to do this.

a) Yes.
b) Up to you.
c) Yes. Although some programs may not realize that the entries have been
UNChecked here, they will go ahead and start anyway.

MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled.

The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place.

For those who do not wish to mess around in the registry, StartMan is a good
deal. It only runs when you start it. It does not have to run in the
background. It can remove the startups for you, not only just disable
them. Whether it's a link in a startup folder or a path in the registry.

StartMan v1.3.96
http://www.pt.lu/comnet/desc/startman.html

From StartMan Help:
[[StartMan is a startup manager created to address some of the shortcomings
in Microsoft's original System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG.EXE).
MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled. Under normal circumstances all startup items should be enabled as
it is difficult to troubleshoot a system's startup while some items are
disabled on a more permanent basis. Such non-essential items should be
removed completely, in order to both release MSCONFIG for its primary
purpose of troubleshooting, and to remove any confusion where duplication
occurs. Where an item is essential, the program that requires it will quite
often re-instate the item. But since it knows nothing of the disabled item,
you end up with a duplicate. A duplicate is simply an item that is both
enabled and disabled (not as impossible as it sounds, since enabled and
disabled items are stored in separate locations). {{{Doesn't have to be an
essential item, some scumware can and will re-enable their startup keys.
Wes}}}

MSCONFIG also doesn't show where each of the startup items are actually
located (versions previous to Windows Me's version). This can be an
important factor when determining whether a startup item is essential to the
system or not. {{{XP's version of msconfig does show the locations, but if
you're not familiar with the registry, they are hard to read. Wes}}}

StartMan addresses all these issues by displaying each group of startups
separately and by permitting the user to delete non-essential items as well
as temporarily disabling the essentials. It is fully-compliant with MSCONFIG
with regards the location of disabled items and, where a duplication occurs,
will automatically offer to remove the disabled item for you (a feature
unique to StartMan). StartMan also displays additional startup groups that
MSCONFIG simply doesn't touch.

IMPORTANT
The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place. The reason for this is that the program
would otherwise be unaware of the changes you'd made with StartMan or any
other startup managers, and some will actually restore their startups
automatically, thus creating duplicates. Therefore always check the main
program's own options or preferences, or the system tray icon's options (if
the program has one) before resorting to any startup manager - including
this one. Startup managers should ONLY be used to disable startups
temporarily - such as when troubleshooting - or to remove non-essential
startups that have no removal options whatsoever. ]]

Where an enabled startup might live >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

Where a disabled item from that location gets stored >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run-

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.
Wes

In
Simon said:
Help, please.

Many sites say that you can speed things up if you deactivate some of
the entries in the MSconfig Startup tab

So can you help me with a few questions:
a) do you deactivate an entry just by clearing the tick?
b) can someone tell me which ones must not be deactivated?
c) and exactly what happens when you untick an entry in the list?.
Will it start up quite happily when you need it (say when you click
on a program icon or open a file from Explorer).
 
G

Guest

Thanks I think that answered my question except what needs to run at startup
if you use msconfig. I not sure what some applications are and I don't want
to mess up.

Wesley Vogel said:
System Configuration Utility (msconfig.exe) is not the place to do this.

a) Yes.
b) Up to you.
c) Yes. Although some programs may not realize that the entries have been
UNChecked here, they will go ahead and start anyway.

MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled.

The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place.

For those who do not wish to mess around in the registry, StartMan is a good
deal. It only runs when you start it. It does not have to run in the
background. It can remove the startups for you, not only just disable
them. Whether it's a link in a startup folder or a path in the registry.

StartMan v1.3.96
http://www.pt.lu/comnet/desc/startman.html

From StartMan Help:
[[StartMan is a startup manager created to address some of the shortcomings
in Microsoft's original System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG.EXE).
MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only be
disabled. Under normal circumstances all startup items should be enabled as
it is difficult to troubleshoot a system's startup while some items are
disabled on a more permanent basis. Such non-essential items should be
removed completely, in order to both release MSCONFIG for its primary
purpose of troubleshooting, and to remove any confusion where duplication
occurs. Where an item is essential, the program that requires it will quite
often re-instate the item. But since it knows nothing of the disabled item,
you end up with a duplicate. A duplicate is simply an item that is both
enabled and disabled (not as impossible as it sounds, since enabled and
disabled items are stored in separate locations). {{{Doesn't have to be an
essential item, some scumware can and will re-enable their startup keys.
Wes}}}

MSCONFIG also doesn't show where each of the startup items are actually
located (versions previous to Windows Me's version). This can be an
important factor when determining whether a startup item is essential to the
system or not. {{{XP's version of msconfig does show the locations, but if
you're not familiar with the registry, they are hard to read. Wes}}}

StartMan addresses all these issues by displaying each group of startups
separately and by permitting the user to delete non-essential items as well
as temporarily disabling the essentials. It is fully-compliant with MSCONFIG
with regards the location of disabled items and, where a duplication occurs,
will automatically offer to remove the disabled item for you (a feature
unique to StartMan). StartMan also displays additional startup groups that
MSCONFIG simply doesn't touch.

IMPORTANT
The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place. The reason for this is that the program
would otherwise be unaware of the changes you'd made with StartMan or any
other startup managers, and some will actually restore their startups
automatically, thus creating duplicates. Therefore always check the main
program's own options or preferences, or the system tray icon's options (if
the program has one) before resorting to any startup manager - including
this one. Startup managers should ONLY be used to disable startups
temporarily - such as when troubleshooting - or to remove non-essential
startups that have no removal options whatsoever. ]]

Where an enabled startup might live >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

Where a disabled item from that location gets stored >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run-

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.
Wes

In
Simon said:
Help, please.

Many sites say that you can speed things up if you deactivate some of
the entries in the MSconfig Startup tab

So can you help me with a few questions:
a) do you deactivate an entry just by clearing the tick?
b) can someone tell me which ones must not be deactivated?
c) and exactly what happens when you untick an entry in the list?.
Will it start up quite happily when you need it (say when you click
on a program icon or open a file from Explorer).
 
M

Mike Hall \(MS-MVP\)

Cheryl

Go to each program in the 'notification area' and look for an option to
remove the program's ability to start automatically..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User






Cheryl said:
Thanks I think that answered my question except what needs to run at
startup
if you use msconfig. I not sure what some applications are and I don't
want
to mess up.

Wesley Vogel said:
System Configuration Utility (msconfig.exe) is not the place to do this.

a) Yes.
b) Up to you.
c) Yes. Although some programs may not realize that the entries have
been
UNChecked here, they will go ahead and start anyway.

MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and
as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only
be
disabled.

The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place.

For those who do not wish to mess around in the registry, StartMan is a
good
deal. It only runs when you start it. It does not have to run in the
background. It can remove the startups for you, not only just disable
them. Whether it's a link in a startup folder or a path in the registry.

StartMan v1.3.96
http://www.pt.lu/comnet/desc/startman.html

From StartMan Help:
[[StartMan is a startup manager created to address some of the
shortcomings
in Microsoft's original System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG.EXE).
MSCONFIG is primarily a troubleshooting tool, not a startup manager, and
as
such it does not permit the permanent removal of startups - they can only
be
disabled. Under normal circumstances all startup items should be enabled
as
it is difficult to troubleshoot a system's startup while some items are
disabled on a more permanent basis. Such non-essential items should be
removed completely, in order to both release MSCONFIG for its primary
purpose of troubleshooting, and to remove any confusion where duplication
occurs. Where an item is essential, the program that requires it will
quite
often re-instate the item. But since it knows nothing of the disabled
item,
you end up with a duplicate. A duplicate is simply an item that is both
enabled and disabled (not as impossible as it sounds, since enabled and
disabled items are stored in separate locations). {{{Doesn't have to be
an
essential item, some scumware can and will re-enable their startup keys.
Wes}}}

MSCONFIG also doesn't show where each of the startup items are actually
located (versions previous to Windows Me's version). This can be an
important factor when determining whether a startup item is essential to
the
system or not. {{{XP's version of msconfig does show the locations, but
if
you're not familiar with the registry, they are hard to read. Wes}}}

StartMan addresses all these issues by displaying each group of startups
separately and by permitting the user to delete non-essential items as
well
as temporarily disabling the essentials. It is fully-compliant with
MSCONFIG
with regards the location of disabled items and, where a duplication
occurs,
will automatically offer to remove the disabled item for you (a feature
unique to StartMan). StartMan also displays additional startup groups
that
MSCONFIG simply doesn't touch.

IMPORTANT
The correct method for removing any startup is to use the program that
placed it there in the first place. The reason for this is that the
program
would otherwise be unaware of the changes you'd made with StartMan or any
other startup managers, and some will actually restore their startups
automatically, thus creating duplicates. Therefore always check the main
program's own options or preferences, or the system tray icon's options
(if
the program has one) before resorting to any startup manager - including
this one. Startup managers should ONLY be used to disable startups
temporarily - such as when troubleshooting - or to remove non-essential
startups that have no removal options whatsoever. ]]

Where an enabled startup might live >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

Where a disabled item from that location gets stored >>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run-

--
Hope this helps. Let us know.
Wes

In
Simon said:
Help, please.

Many sites say that you can speed things up if you deactivate some of
the entries in the MSconfig Startup tab

So can you help me with a few questions:
a) do you deactivate an entry just by clearing the tick?
b) can someone tell me which ones must not be deactivated?
c) and exactly what happens when you untick an entry in the list?.
Will it start up quite happily when you need it (say when you click
on a program icon or open a file from Explorer).
 
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S

Sharon F

Thanks I think that answered my question except what needs to run at startup
if you use msconfig. I not sure what some applications are and I don't want
to mess up.
Technically, Windows needs absolutely nothing on the startup page of
msconfig to run. However, you may have various hardware devices that depend
on some of those items. Printer, scanner, mouse and burner software could
fall into this category.

Then there may be several items for protection programs such as antivirus,
anti-spyware and personal firewalls. In most cases, you want to keep these
things.

There may be one or two programs that are simply convenience items. For
example, I like to run a program that captures and catalogs all copied
information. Another that is allowed to run is a macro program - inserts
text when assigned shortcut keys are pressed. I also run a customized
desktop so let that program run at startup as well.

You need to figure out exactly what each startup item is. Then decide if it
is necessary or not. When you get to the personal extras - the convenience
items - choose programs that you use every single day and during every
computing session. All others can be disabled from automatically starting.
Instead, launch these programs by using their start menu or desktop
shortcuts when you want to use them.

There are various online guides that list explanations for startup items.
These are good references to help you determine what is needed/not needed
for your setup. Here is the URL for one of them:
http://www.answersthatwork.com/Tasklist_pages/tasklist.htm
 
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