Malwarebytes for chkdsk error?


K

KenK

I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA
 
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O

OldGuy

I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA

Download the free Acronis Drive Monitor ADM_reg_en-US.exe heath
application.
Let it tell you what the drive SMART is reporting.
Then you will know if your drive is about to bite the dust.
I have used it on my PCs with HDDs and USB HDDs and it reports all with
SMART capability.
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

KenK said:
I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I thought chkdsk marked bad sectors it found, so they wouldn't be used
in future - though I think it _reports_ them again on subsequent runs.
Does it tell you _where_ the error is, and/or is the size reported
increasing?
I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA
Well, Malwarebytes is AIUI a malware thing; unless there's some piece of
malware around that masquerades as a chkdsk-detectable error, then I'd
tend to think it's not going to help - or, at least, I think something
that checks the SMART status of the HDs on two or more occasions and
checks whether they're getting worse, will be more
productive/reassuring. (Ideally get a checker from the drive
manufacturer - the Seagate one I've got seems good; some of the SMART
reading utilities can be a bit alarmist/alarming, as not all
manufacturers use all the SMART features in quite the same way, so
generic ones can look as if something is drastic when it isn't. Though
if they say [as I said, based on two or more readings, ideally some time
apart] that some parameter is _getting_ significantly worse [i. e.
changing], then I would start looking around for a replacement disc.)
 
P

Paul

KenK said:
I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA

There are a couple ways, to signal that a CHKDSK run is required.

1) Open Command Prompt. Check the "dirty bit" on C:. Each partition
has a flag, which can be set by a user (or program), but not cleared.
But CHKDSK can clear the bit, once the partition has a clean bill of
health.

fsutil dirty query C:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...all/proddocs/en-us/fsutil_dirty.mspx?mfr=true

An example of usage might be, you boot Linux, Linux makes some
changes to the partition, but seeks to get the "blessing" of
Windows, the next time Windows boots and goes to use the partition.
Linux can assert (set) the dirty bit, as a means of communicating
that CHKDSK should be run. Typically this would happen, if say the
NTFS journal wasn't valid. And asserting "dirty", is a "better safe
than sorry" approach.

2) Windows can also store scheduled CHKDSK operations in a registry
key. Typically, a user might request CHKDSK C:, but since the system
has C: mounted, you can't run the CHKDSK right away.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager
BootExecute REG_MULTI_SZ autocheck autochk *

BootExecute is just a place to store a command to be executed
early on, in the boot process. In this case, it is executed
before C: is mounted. So C: is not busy at this point.
The autocheck determines whether any dirty bits are set,
and calls the appropriate CHKDSK utility (i.e. CHKNTFS) to finish
the job. Most of the time, there is no work to do, and this step
finishes in a flash.

And this would be the registry key value, if a CHKDSK had been
scheduled by the user. This registry key would be reset to
the default value, after CHKDSK was finished. The BootExecute key
can also have multiple lines of text in it, such as when a third
party utility wishes to start before any other programs have a
chance to start.

autocheck autochk /r \??\C:

*******

Hard drives have automatic defect management. In the case of IDE/SATA
drives, the defect management is not reversible (like it can be on
SCSI drives).

The drive has spare sectors. It replaces bad sectors with spares. The
disk continues to return read data for each sector (whether a spare
or a regular sector). It's only when the drive runs out of spares in
a particular area of the disk, that eventually the disk throws a "CRC
error". At that point, the Windows file system is involved, and
an entire cluster can be marked as $BADCLUS. That should prevent the
cluster from being used for storage later. Usually the computer is
in pretty sad shape, by the time things have sunk that low. The
hard drive is likely very slow, and the user already has an inkling
that drive death is imminent.

Reformatting a drive, would remove any memories of bad clusters,
but they would be rediscovered again by the file system (eventually).
Whereas the hardware level defect management, is not supposed
to be reset (unless the drive is returned to the factory
and the appropriate utility used to clear all the spared
sectors).

I've reset the defect management system on SCSI drives in the past,
and pretty soon, it detects the defects again and spares them out.
In some cases, it's possible for an IDE drive to mistakenly mark
a lot of sectors as bad, when they aren't, but I'm not aware
of any way with those drives, to "fix" them. There is no longer
a low level format capability, so you can't expect to do it
that way. Modern drives are low level formatted once at the factory,
and that is "good for life". Every other operation done to
an IDE drive, is a "sector write". So at the best of times,
an attempt to format a modern IDE drive, just does writes
to all the sectors. No structures on the disk are changed by that
(no servo wedges re-written, no data structures reset). I don't
even think an Enhanced Secure Erase (one of the IDE commands),
affects stuff like that. It's still just "sector write" at heart.

*******

Start by checking the two items above. It's probably
not going to fix anything, but it'll tell you what's
been set, either on the drive, or in the Registry.
You would need to run Regedit, to inspect that
registry entry.

Paul
 
P

philo 

I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA



Malwarebytes does not do a disk check.


If you simply run "CHKDSK" it will do nothing more than perform an audit.

What you need to do is open an administrative command prompt and run

CHKDSK /F


answer the question "Y" then reboot and let it run completely.
 
M

micky

There are a couple ways, to signal that a CHKDSK run is required.

1) Open Command Prompt. Check the "dirty bit" on C:. Each partition
has a flag, which can be set by a user (or program), but not cleared.
But CHKDSK can clear the bit, once the partition has a clean bill of
health.

fsutil dirty query C:

Hey, that was fun.
 
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D

David H. Lipman

From: "KenK said:
I've had a persistant chkdsk error on C for many years. I fix it with
chkdsk and it's back again next check. Otherwise the drive works just fine.

I was in Staples to buy a printer toner cart and asked their repair guy
about the drive problem while I was there and he was ringing up the cart.
He said to DL Malwarebytes.

Before I do this on my very slow dial-up connection do you think it's worth
the trouble? I run Kasperski update and critical area scan every day and a
full scan every few weeks. Never finds anthing.

TIA

Determine the manuafacturer of the hard disk and runb the hard disk diagnostic for that
disk.

Examples:
IBM/Hitachi - Drive Fitness Test (DFT)
Seagate - SeaTools
Western Digital - WD Diagnostics
 

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